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Alister_G

Ladmanlow Sidings and other C&HPR locations

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No, Al, your backscene could do with a repaint.

Only joking

That is wonderful

Derek

 

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That looks superb Al

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Loving this Al - really captured the spirit of the C&HPR with the extension. 

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That's a great set of photo's Al. With a backdrop like that you cant go wrong, really works well with the layout. :)

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3 hours ago, Alister_G said:

This morning, I did this:

 

 

Wow.

 

Adrian

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Brilliant mate, just need to build a shed out there with a big window, and it could look like that permanently, haha.:good:SUPERB.

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Nice Al, very, Very Nice!

Regards Lez.

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Those photos are top, Bob on.

Really excellent most enjoyable to look through them a few times.

 Cheers   

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Very, very effective and realistic.

 

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18 minutes ago, KNP said:

Very, very effective and realistic.

 

 

Thanks very much Kevin. Now if only I could transport the countryside into the layout room to take these at home... :D

 

I might try and get a panoramic photo from that location and try it as a backscene, but I'm not sure it would work.

 

Al.

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4 hours ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

At least that's the site of the C&HPR mini exhibition sorted!

 

Mike.

Social distancing is possible at any distance Boris feels like on that particular day!

 

Looks superb

 

Martyn

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This pair of images perhaps makes it more obvious. For this I used a different script, where you set the start and end points of the required depth-of-field by physically pointing your camera at the two extremes and pressing the "Set" button, then you compose the shot and start the script. In this instance I didn't set the "far" point far enough, but you get the idea.

 

So here's a normal shot, using Macro setting and the auto-focus's best guess...

 

ladmanlow1283.jpg.e2faefc56a1b89342030d104174b2540.jpg

 

You can see it failed miserably, really. Then, here's the same shot using the script to run 10 incrementing focus points, and then stacking the resulting images in Helicon:

 

ladmanlow1284.jpg.72efabdf2309e8c7d8170a93771a9016.jpg

 

Much better, except it ran out of increments before it had got to the end of the loco. But that was my fault...

 

Thanks for looking,

 

Al.

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I can see why focus stacking is in favour right now for macro photography, but I do feel that it can be overdone. Remember that depth of field is a natural phenomenon, one we experience every day, naturally.

I think the key to making natural looking photos of model railways is to remember this and make the number of increments that are appropriate to the subject to give a natural feel to the picture.

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Posted (edited)

Hi David,

 

Yes absolutely it can be overdone.

 

However one of the challenges of model photography is that if you use a physically small camera, so that you can get in close to get ground-level shots, then you inevitably compromise the depth of field, particularly if when using macro settings, the subject of the image can be less than a couple of centimetres from the end of the lens.

 

Most small cameras can't cope with that, so focus stacking offers a way to address that and artificially increase the depth of field to something approximating what you would get if photographing the real thing.

 

The one thing that immediately triggers the brain to identify a model is the lack of depth of field in a lot of photos, so as you say, sufficient increments to make it feel natural are what is required.

 

Thanks very much,

 

Al.

Edited by Alister_G
clarity.
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So, I consider that the add-on module with the cutting and embankment is about done, and I've got the urge to do some more modelling, so it looks like it's time for a new module.

 

I'm thinking a 3 foot one this time, so I can fit a bit more on. It will be another portrayal of the C&HPR, but not just a straight bit of track. However it will still need to connect to the main board at one end, and the fiddleyard at the other, so the entry and exit tracks will have to be in the same place.

 

I've come up with the following:

 

ladmanlow-module2.jpg.9e123c05b4a5b4a8a5827390f764cc19.jpg

 

It uses a single Code75 medium right-hand turnout (which I happen to have in stock).

 

The only problem is the large expanse of field at the front, but I can't see a way round that, given the two ends have to be where they are. I was thinking I might hang yet another module off the back at some point, to continue that line.

 

What do you think?

 

Al.

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Posted (edited)

Sounds great and with you building it I am sure it will look great. If you made the road go over the railway you would have somewhere to store your model bus! :jester:

Edited by Chris116
Word vanished
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Posted (edited)

Hi Al, I do like the idea of these small modules as you can concentrate on a small area at a time and get it finished to a good standard as you do, and not get overwhelmed at looking at a large unfinished layout. All the best Adrian.

Edited by westerhamstation
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52 minutes ago, Alister_G said:

So, I consider that the add-on module with the cutting and embankment is about done, and I've got the urge to do some more modelling, so it looks like it's time for a new module.

 

I'm thinking a 3 foot one this time, so I can fit a bit more on. It will be another portrayal of the C&HPR, but not just a straight bit of track. However it will still need to connect to the main board at one end, and the fiddleyard at the other, so the entry and exit tracks will have to be in the same place.

 

I've come up with the following:

 

ladmanlow-module2.jpg.9e123c05b4a5b4a8a5827390f764cc19.jpg

 

It uses a single Code75 medium right-hand turnout (which I happen to have in stock).

 

The only problem is the large expanse of field at the front, but I can't see a way round that, given the two ends have to be where they are. I was thinking I might hang yet another module off the back at some point, to continue that line.

 

What do you think?

 

Al.

Like the idea.

How about a lake, or edge of one?

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Al,

 

Continuing the theme of the Harpur Hill and Ladmanlow branch, what about a row of quarry men's cottages at the front, slightly below the level of the railway?

 

The other area of great interest is the section to the north of the Hoffman Kiln at Harpur Hill, with the wagon repair shops. I'd post some pictures, but the moderators will doubtless object! Hopefully you know where I mean.

 

Regards,

 

Geraint

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