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Whittle20

N Gauge modelling

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Hi All,

 

I'm after some advice regarding N gauge modelling.

 

I've recently taken up the hobby after many years of thinking and a spare room in the house becoming available.

During the Warley model rail show (NEC) i purchased two n gauge diesel locos a few wagons and some track.

 

The space i have is limited and N gauge gives me a true model with loco's pulling a number of wagons that pleasing to the eye.

 

My main problem is handling the models, I've recently added the detailing kit to the front of a class 66 but found it a nightmare.

I have hands like shovels unfortunately and found it very tricky even with tweezers and magnifying stand. Then to find out you can't really see it when on the layout so may not bother going forward.

 

The main question here is does it become harder trying to model landscapes with fences, figures lighting etc,etc the finer detail? I'm still in the early stages and if i need to consider 00 gauge i could.

Problem with 00, i love the size and the detail but have no room for a layout without having a larger room and a complete re-think of the layout. 

 

Thanks for your help.

Andy.

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Hi Andy,

 

Nothing is going to be perfect, and there'll always need to be compromise somewhere.

 

For you, are scale length trains in a landscape more important than fine detailing? I model N, and find the balance, for me, is that I prefer the "bigger picture" so stick with the smaller scale. I can get what to me is an enjoyable level of detail while at the same time having space for a reasonable amount of scenics. Others are more focussed on stock, and for them the larger scales make more sense.

 

I would say that fine detailing in N becomes easier with practice, though I am pretty sure lots of people don't bother to fit the pipes etc to the fronts of locos.

 

Cheers

 

Ben A.

Edited by Ben A
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Hi Andy and welcome,

I think it best to be realistic about what you can do with the space available, your skill level, and what you would most like to achieve.

Limited space with a desire to see trains running that "pleases the eye" is as good a justification as you'll ever need.

The add-on detailing is nice to have, modellers often like to take and post pretty pictures of their detailing skills, but it's not a prerequisite for enjoying the hobby.

Although there are fine examples of super detailed models running on super detailed layouts which should always inspire, but sometimes it can make a beginner feel disillusioned, with N you can treat it as an 'impressionist' scale so if there is a limit you perceive in your ability to match those finer examples for now I wouldn't worry so much - it's meant to be enjoyable.

I'd suggest that if allow yourself to you gain experience and skills as you progress,you could return later to aspects of your layout to enhance/upgrade what you have already achieved - and you'll have had the fun element from the outset.

 

Regards, Gerry.

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I'm of the opinion that the size of the items you handle doesn't change, merely the scale. So some jobs may be fiddlier in the N than they would in OO (or O or whatever), but you don't need the same level of detail. You could argue that a comparable level of detail would be easier to apply in OO, but then I think it may look 'unfinished' and you'd end up adding more details, which you can simply omit in N. As you've found a lot of detailing packs aren't necessary if you're not looking too closely. Removing the obtrusive rapido couplers if you're not going to need both ends can improve the appearance markedly, and you're not having to mess around with holes in buffer beams for tiny pipes. I do tend to fit them to locos when I get around to it, but it's principally because I know they're there than because there's any difference! I very rarely fit added details to coaches or wagons, whilst in OO gauge I definitely would.

 

I'm a big fan of (near) scale length trains in a comparatively modest space, and whilst I do really like the look of OO gauge I'm very happy with N and unlikely to change! You need such a massive space in OO for things not to look squashed in, the same just isn't true in N.

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Thank you all for the kind response.

 

It's very helpful absorbing everyone's input and gives me confidence in my decision making.

I'm looking to replicate to a degree the Peak Forest quarry, albeit some changes to make everything fit.

 

I do prefer near to scale trains, N gauge would really work in the scenario.

 

From your feedback, i think i'm going to persevere and hope over time my technique gets better. I enjoy the hobby no matter how frustrated i get it's takes me away from the hectic daily work schedule.

Thanks again.

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I model in N and find that good tools help a lot so I have invested in a magnifying lamp and magnifying glasses that fit round my head plus reading glasses of various strengths. Fine jewellers tweezers help a lot too. A lot of the tools used for jewellery making are useful for railway modellers.

 

I tend to leave off most of the details in the detail packs too fiddly and I can’t see them that well from a distance anyway.

 

I’ve heard people say they’ve had to give up N because of their eyes, I’ve just got stronger glasses.

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I model in N, and I am 'fortunate??' that I don't have any eye for detail.

 

What I mean by that is for me any of the N Gauge 47's released in the past 40 years look like a 47, it's only when I see pictures of them placed together that I notice differences or inaccuracies.

 

I also don't notice the odd missing grill or door on a loco unless it's pointed out to me.

 

As a result I don't add any detailing bits to my loco's at all.

 

I am strictly modern so I don't have to worry about fiddly bits on kettles.

 

Regards,

 

John P

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I'm not very good at fi e detail work. I wasn't in 1974 when I started N and age and arthritis haven't helped. But as I type I have a G2 pulling nearly 30 wagons lapping the track in one direction and a J11 running the other way with 7 wagons on a pi up goods. Sitting in the station waiting for the board to come off is a D20 with a local passenger train with 5 coaches and a van. All this in half a modern small bedroom.

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