Jump to content
Having problems logging in to RMweb? Read more... ×

Andy Y

Hornby - New tooling - Ruston 48DS 0-4-0

Recommended Posts

A look at the pictures at the beginning of this thread has to be the best argument for an alternative to tension lock couplers. Imagine the T/L on both ends of the Ruston and you’ll see what I mean.

 

Cheers,

 

David

Mine is going to have the match wagon permanently close coupled. I might also replace the conflat with something a bit smaller.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very nice thanks! Were they painted EP's? They look like the finished product to me!?

 

The photos on page 1 (from the December press event) say they are decorated samples.  I would take that to mean they are close to the finished thing as they have been supplied by the factory for approval of the painting / printing but that any final little details may not be attached as it is more making sure the artwork has transferred to the model correctly.  The other option is that they are samples that have been hand painted by Hornby here in the UK, but usually that is made clear given that the finish often isn't as good/accurate and the artwork / lining on the Queen Anne version appears to be very good.

 

As to possible missing details, perhaps email Hornby if concerned but at least some of the models announced seem to be a step back from the high detail that Hornby has been doing in the past as they work to meet price points.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Hornby Collectors Magazine references this having space for a "6 pin Nano" decoder, as the 6 pin decoder Hornby are producing a 6 pin cable to a decoder on a pcb I take it that the Nano refers a DCC Concepts decoder i.e 6 pins directly on the decoder and it must be the first Hornby have made something deliberately requiring, if necessary, the use of a third party product. Given the space required for a 6 pin I cannot help but wonder why a Next 18 socket has not been used other than that being too much of an advance by Hornby as such would allow for further weight. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in knowing how well the match truck comes apart before committing myself.  A conflat is about as much use as a chocolate teapot in a colliery setting.  It would be nice to think the body could be easily exchanged for a three plank open (with a few oversize spanners, sledgehammers, timber baulks and tarpaulins to be added as a load).

 

Les

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latest Engine Shed blog has a larger picture with a different angle, it looks like a small 2 pin socket just under the coupling for the connection to the optional wagon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shame it's not 4 wires then it would be a simple job to fit a sound decoder and speaker in the match wagon, camoflaged in some way, and still use all the pick-ups.Would have made it possible to have a TTS version.

 

Still possible of course, but extra work.

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latest Engine Shed blog has a larger picture with a different angle, it looks like a small 2 pin socket just under the coupling for the connection to the optional wagon.

I noticed this as well.

Its definitely mentioned as 'optional conflat wagon'. It also clearly shows a plug on the front as well.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be interested in knowing how well the match truck comes apart before committing myself.  A conflat is about as much use as a chocolate teapot in a colliery setting.  It would be nice to think the body could be easily exchanged for a three plank open (with a few oversize spanners, sledgehammers, timber baulks and tarpaulins to be added as a load).

 

Les

I'm not entirely convinced that a 48DS would be big enough for most colliery work but, if I wanted a more appropriate wagon, I'd be looking to transfer the Hornby pick-ups, socket etc. to something else of my choosing.

 

As for what you actually ask, I'd expect the Conflat to be based on the usual Airfix/Hornby type with a clip at each corner, so no great difficulty in getting it apart. However, if you want a 3-plank body to replace it, Hornby don't do one so it's not a straight swap. The choice is between a Bachmann one or a Ratio kit, so you'll need to work out how to fit it for yourself. I'd go for the Bachmann option, personally. The Ratio floor has chassis ribs underneath so you'd need to make a new flat one, though it might be possible to reduce the Conflat body to fit within the Ratio sides/ends, in which case you could keep the standard mountings.

 

I have fitted several Airfix/Dapol/Hornby vans with Bachmann underframes for the better detail, but haven't (for obvious reasons) done it the other way round.

 

My provisional method, assuming what I wrote in paragraph 2 proves to be so, would be:

 

1. Work out size and shape of unoccupied spaces in the chassis. You will almost certainly need to remove the ballast weight.

 

2. Cut two rectangles of thick plasticard that will fit within them.

 

3. Drill, countersink and tap said rectangles to take a M2 or 8BA bolt.

 

4. Glue finished mounting blocks to underside of body, to line up with the available voids in the chassis. Probably a good idea to make/fit some additional smaller lugs to help the body locate well within with the chassis.

 

5. Make holes in underframe for bolts to pass through.

 

6. Add new weight to chassis (lead sheet or "liquid lead" to choice) to ensure effective electrical pick-up and attach the body with nuts and washers.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear. I like these little beasties and in browsing this thread I’ve found one of the liveries is post preservation. (Queen Anne Whisky). I’m modelling a fictional preserved line. I didn’t need this.

 

As a bonus, in the garage are several cardboard boxes than once held Queen Anne whisky (now filled with ham radio shite and bits, that need sorting). Wonder if I could do a mini copy or two sat on the conflat?

 

Owain

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear. I like these little beasties and in browsing this thread I’ve found one of the liveries is post preservation. (Queen Anne Whisky). I’m modelling a fictional preserved line. I didn’t need this.

 

As a bonus, in the garage are several cardboard boxes than once held Queen Anne whisky (now filled with ham radio shite and bits, that need sorting). Wonder if I could do a mini copy or two sat on the conflat?

 

Owain

The Queen Anne livery was applied when it was still a working loco. It was applied for IIRC the 150th anniversery of the distillery, about two years before the distillery closed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Queen Anne livery was applied when it was still a working loco. It was applied for IIRC the 150th anniversery of the distillery, about two years before the distillery closed.

The distillery closed in 1979 so c 1977.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, just on the quality of those 3D pints, and the overall increasing fidelity and quality of 3D printing. I do wonder how long it will be before we end up paying to download a model, rather than actual buying a physical thing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Queen Anne livery was applied when it was still a working loco. It was applied for IIRC the 150th anniversery of the distillery, about two years before the distillery closed.

 

Aye, knock up into a canny model that distillery.  Speshully if yoush like unushuel lochos...Hic!

 

post-508-0-57204900-1547300465_thumb.jpg

 

post-508-0-90709600-1547300486_thumb.jpg

 

From: http://www.whiskyintelligence.com/2018/03/benriach-distillery-profile-by-mark-davidson-aka-the-jolly-toper-scotch-whisky-news/

 

And from Railscot:

 

https://www.railscot.co.uk/companies/G/Glenlossie_Railway/

 

https://www.railscot.co.uk/img/56/166/

(Check out the auto-uncoupler)

 

P

Edited by Porcy Mane
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my iPad this topic appears as Hornby - New tooling - Rust.. under the latest post info. Can’t see that selling :-)

Edited by brushman47544

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On my iPad this topic appears as Hornby - New tooling - Rust.. under the latest post info. Can’t see that selling :-)

I said the same about mazak rot, but look how that took off!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, just on the quality of those 3D pints, and the overall increasing fidelity and quality of 3D printing. I do wonder how long it will be before we end up paying to download a model, rather than actual buying a physical thing. 

 

A very, very, very long while. Then with resin (currently) at £60 a kilo, we await the inevitable moans about the price, and that you don't get a motor and that you have to paint it. Oh, and you'll need a printer.

 

As a guide, a couple of years ago, at the TCT 3D print show, I was shown an N gauge Dutch EMU body. Price to print £100. It was nearly as good as an injection moulded model after finishing and paint. There was about the same amount of material in it as a 48DS body.

 

If you want a kit, Judith Edge does one. If you want a 3D printed one, then talk to these guys who have a G1 model under development.

 

Things will change over time, but as the technology has been around since the 1970s, I'd suggest you would be better off placing an order for a 48DS with your local model shop rather than hoping you can save a few quid making your own...

 

And now back to the 48DS please. There is a separate area to talk about 3D printing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shame it's not 4 wires then it would be a simple job to fit a sound decoder and speaker in the match wagon, camoflaged in some way, and still use all the pick-ups.Would have made it possible to have a TTS version.

 

Still possible of course, but extra work.

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

How about the TTS sound van, can you swap the chip in here ?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As one of the main restorers of Queen Anne, I offer the following observations about the new Hornby model.

The roof shows three rows of prominent rivets. There is no central row and the fasteners are small bolt heads.

Queen Anne has had no lifting eyes at the corners since at least 1951.

There should be a cast plate on the chassis above the front left wheel. It bears the words Ms Longmorn Glenlivet Distillers Ltd.

There should be an extra support bracket on the front sand pipes.

The radiator filler tube looks too thin and tall.

The cab has curtains, which hang on copper rings made for one of the whisky making processes.

The Queen Anne whisky livery has black wheels with cream rims.

Page 86 of Iron Rails and Whisky Trails has a photo in original green livery taken 1980.

The engine cowlings were all cut off and replaced with a plain steel sheet, on which the QA whisky livery was applied, which is correctly shown on the model. It then was donated to Strathspey along with some closed wagons and brickwork.

When the restoration is complete the loco will be as running at Longmorn, green with Ruston logos, proper engine cowls and all the little eccentricities applied at Longmorn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As one of the main restorers of Queen Anne, I offer the following observations about the new Hornby model.

The roof shows three rows of prominent rivets. There is no central row and the fasteners are small bolt heads.

Queen Anne has had no lifting eyes at the corners since at least 1951.

There should be a cast plate on the chassis above the front left wheel. It bears the words Ms Longmorn Glenlivet Distillers Ltd.

There should be an extra support bracket on the front sand pipes.

The radiator filler tube looks too thin and tall.

The cab has curtains, which hang on copper rings made for one of the whisky making processes.

The Queen Anne whisky livery has black wheels with cream rims.

Page 86 of Iron Rails and Whisky Trails has a photo in original green livery taken 1980.

The engine cowlings were all cut off and replaced with a plain steel sheet, on which the QA whisky livery was applied, which is correctly shown on the model. It then was donated to Strathspey along with some closed wagons and brickwork.

When the restoration is complete the loco will be as running at Longmorn, green with Ruston logos, proper engine cowls and all the little eccentricities applied at Longmorn.

 

If you feel short changed with this offering from Hornby well feel sorry for us NBL fans

post-1776-0-75476600-1547332062.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latest Engine Shed blog has a larger picture with a different angle, it looks like a small 2 pin socket just under the coupling for the connection to the optional wagon.

Hopefully the 2-pin connectors will be available as spares for fitting to other stock / multiple units etc.

 

Speaking of units, hopefully someone at Hornby will notice they'll soon have 2' 6" wheels with gears & mechanism (along with a discreet inter-car power coupling) & re-engineer the Pacer chassis with said items?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I can understand why people want added pickups to ensure continued pickup over dodgy sections of track the addition of a match truck seems to be over engineering things. A simple suspension unit which allows one axle to rock and keep all four wheels (in the case of the Ruston) on the track. This idea has been suggested before, both in this thread and with regard to other 0-4-0 engines. There has been some progress, the Model Rail Sentinel has sufficient end play in its axles that it will run fine on even P4 track without any added suspension needed and the Ruston could also do the same. It remains to be seen how it has been set up.

 

Cheers,

 

David

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I can understand why people want added pickups to ensure continued pickup over dodgy sections of track the addition of a match truck seems to be over engineering things. A simple suspension unit which allows one axle to rock and keep all four wheels (in the case of the Ruston) on the track. This idea has been suggested before, both in this thread and with regard to other 0-4-0 engines. There has been some progress, the Model Rail Sentinel has sufficient end play in its axles that it will run fine on even P4 track without any added suspension needed and the Ruston could also do the same. It remains to be seen how it has been set up.

 

Cheers,

 

David

 

Have you seen the size of them? The Sentinel is at least twice the size. These are more like the Wickham trollies which also needed a trailer.

 

But I would suggest the Conflat is mainly meant for those that have train set track with insulfrogs rather than scale track.

 

 

 

Jason

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The match wagon and its extra pickups are only going to be needed for the people who still use dead frog points. Most of my OO locomotives are very small industrial 0-4-0 types and they all perform perfectly well without match trucks over Peco track, switches and crossings. A lot of them are rigid-framed and there's still no problem, so knowing how much slop is built into RTR models I'm sure these new locos will run fine without the match trucks, and without rocking axles, on trackwork where a reasonable amount of care has been taken in laying it and that uses live frogs.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.