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Andy Y

Hornby - New tooling - Ruston 48DS 0-4-0

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29 minutes ago, dibber25 said:

No idea what wheelbase the one in the photo is - probably 9ft but I can't say I'm bothered enough to mess with the chassis. The picture I'm looking at is the Express Dairies Ruston in the thread about 'Milk to Morden' in the prototype section of RMweb. The wooden bodied wagon has a BR number panel but lots of patched planks and pre-BR paint and dirt. (CJL)

 

If something realistic is wanted, a 9ft. WB wooden mineral wagon chassis with the sides and ends stripped off would be most likely; (10ft. WB seven plank mineral wagons would have been rare, to say the least)!

 

Visibility would be important, and an intact seven plank mineral wagon would block most of the driver's view with a tiny loco such as this.

 

If a runner / pick-up wagon is essential, it should not be difficult to fit a 9' WB wagon chassis with pick-ups, and transfer the plug and socket from the CONFLAT.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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26 minutes ago, PhilJ W said:

Simon Kohler is due to give a talk at our railway enthusiasts group next Thursday 

 

Noooo! Just say "Thanks muchly for the 48DS, as far as rtr goes it's a fantastic bit of kit". Then place him in a trance & repetitively mutter "88Ds...88Ds.." ;-) 

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11 hours ago, cctransuk said:

 

If something realistic is wanted, a 9ft. WB wooden mineral wagon chassis with the sides and ends stripped off would be most likely; (10ft. WB seven plank mineral wagons would have been rare, to say the least)!

 

Visibility would be important, and an intact seven plank mineral wagon would block most of the driver's view with a tiny loco such as this.

 

If a runner / pick-up wagon is essential, it should not be difficult to fit a 9' WB wagon chassis with pick-ups, and transfer the plug and socket from the CONFLAT.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

When I tested one, I found it was OK with the conflat but running was even more positive when the conflat was 'loaded' with a large track rubber (well, it was handy and it fitted!). I'm thinking, long-term of a repaint for the Ruston and use in a milk depot and I stumbled across this picture elsewhere on RMweb. I'm sure the wagon isn't a 'runner' for the Ruston but just happens to be next to it in the siding. As much as anything else, my body swap was to see how much (if any) the old Airfix chassis has been changed. Evidently, not much, as the old body was a perfect fit. (CJL)

Industrial_Express_Dairy_slide331-M.jpg

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This was the Express Dairiy at Morden it also had a larger engine that done the bulk of the work. As well as milk tankers in and out coal for the boilers was also delivered by rail and the Ruston is probably shunting the empties. I hope that Hornby do bring out an Express Dairy liveried version, an attractive livery.

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On 06/11/2019 at 22:41, PhilJ W said:

Conflats were attached to some 03 and 04 classes to operate signal circuits. Though the Rustons often operated where there were no signals let alone signal circuits.

The Rustons never operated on signalled or track circuited running lines (unless someone can come up with a BR licensed example) as they were strictly industrial locos for use in private sidings and yards.  This goes for most industrials, including Pecketts, Andrew Barclays. Janus, and Sentinels.  There were some Hunslet Austerity type 0-6-0STs licensed for use on BR running lines in the North East of England, but by and large industrials work on their own sidings and main line locos come into the exchange sidings as far as the stop board.  

 

IIRC the Airfix/Dapol conflat was a scale 10' wheebase, and a BD type container would not have fitted on a 9' wheelbase flat.  My objection to it is that the chassis tooling is a bit crude and the brake lever is moulded; if I had one I'd be replacing it with current spec Bachmann.  Incidentally, one of the cheapest donors is the Bachmann conflat...

 

I doubt that 48DS Rustons ran with a match truck very often, which would anyway eat into their already limited haulage capacity, though on a large site where the loco might get some way from the servicing point an internal user wagon of some sort, likely a semi-derelict flat, to carry spare fuel, coolant, and spares might have come in handy.

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56 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

There were some Hunslet Austerity type 0-6-0STs licensed for use on BR running lines in the North East of England, but by and large industrials work on their own sidings and main line locos come into the exchange sidings as far as the stop board.  

 

There was shed loads of industrial's registered to travel over BR lines.  Sometimes only for very short distances and sometimes only occasionally. Then there was companies that exercised running powers over BR lines. Sometimes the companies had to provide brake vans or similar for BR inspectors to travel in, sometimes not. If it was for occasional use BR would send a fitter to examine the loco before travel.

An comparable small shunter to the Rustons that ran over BR lines was the Armstrong Whitworth of Reyrolle in Hebburn. Reyrolle had works on both sides of  the BR lines that the works shunter had to use to travel between sites.

 

Three different Rustons on the riverside at Middlesbrough regularly ran on the freight only BR lines along Vulcan street. There's a pic of 402808 doing so in this post and it wears no BR Registration plate.

 

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7 hours ago, The Johnster said:

IIRC the Airfix/Dapol conflat was a scale 10' wheebase, and a BD type container would not have fitted on a 9' wheelbase flat.

 

My recollection, from building most of the pre-Nationalisation CONFLATs, is that the body of the 9' WB version has the same dimensions as the 10' WB one; 17'-6'' in length.

 

After all, the containers that were loaded were not specific to the wheelbase of the CONFLAT.

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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Acquired one cheaper than normal off ebay and fitted it with a Zimo MX622N which, having read on the thread the longer and bulkier Bachmann 6 pin apparently fits, I thought would be no problem but it initially stopped the body going back on properly. By ensuring the decoder and socket were right to the front the body would go on and then did a right angle fit with the socket down the end of the motor to ensure definitely no refit issues in the future, with insulation tape applies to the motor casing and wrapped across the exposed pins Annoyingly one of lifting eyes fell off, managed to retrieve it from the rug. Did ponder why the design did not allow for the electrical sockets to be further back and presumably the apparent need for the pick up wagon was only determined on after the chassis had been designed. Roof now off awaiting an appropriate driver figure.

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On 27/10/2019 at 15:07, pauliebanger said:

 

 

How is that possible?

 

That shouldn't be possible.

 

How is the power coming through the paper?

 

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1 hour ago, Captain Kernow said:

How is that possible?

 

That shouldn't be possible.

 

How is the power coming through the paper?

 

Its down to the "potential" of the electrical supply - all insulators will at some point breakdown and allow electric flow. Potentially its risky trying it with paper as the likely outcome is the paper catching fire.

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1 hour ago, Captain Kernow said:

How is that possible?

 

That shouldn't be possible.

 

How is the power coming through the paper?

 

 

Judging by the title of the video, it isn't - it's a stay-alive chip.

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I've seen a stay-alive chip demonstrated by taking the loco off the track and running it across the baseboard top. They will typically run a loco for a couple of yards without any power from the track. I wonder how long it will be before mainstream manufacturers start to fit them in small 0-4-0s as standard. (CJL)

 

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Stay-alive only works with DCC. With DC, there's no way to tell the difference between a deliberate loss of power (turning the knob down on the controller) and an unwanted loss of power (dodgy track or wiring). And there aren't that many small locos that are DCC fitted as standard, even now.

 

Part of the problem is that small locos tend to be built down to a price point, because they're often marketed as entry-level models (or, in the case of more obscure things like industrials, the price is kept low because manufacturers aren't certain of the market).  And adding DCC and stay-alive to a low-priced model results in a disproportionate increase in the RRP compared to doing the same with a loco that costs more to start with.

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1 hour ago, Captain Kernow said:

How is that possible?

 

That shouldn't be possible.

 

How is the power coming through the paper?

 

 

CK

As others have pointed out, there's a stay alive capacitor pack included in the installation. It will run for much further than the width of that paper sheet, but that would be just showing off. LOL.

 

If you think that's impressive, see the video below. Stay Alives only work on DCC, right? (Not if your decoder is a ZIMO, the world's most accomplished decoders on so many levels).

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

 

 

 

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On 07/11/2019 at 11:58, PhilJ W said:

Simon Kohler is due to give a talk at our railway enthusiasts group next Thursday so if I get the chance I intend to suggest an Express Dairies version. Also the army version will be open cab but there is an army one with closed cab in preservation, I will suggest that as well.

 

Tell him to do DS1169 as well!

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13 minutes ago, MarkSG said:

Stay-alive only works with DCC. With DC, there's no way to tell the difference between a deliberate loss of power (turning the knob down on the controller) and an unwanted loss of power (dodgy track or wiring). And there aren't that many small locos that are DCC fitted as standard, even now.

 

Part of the problem is that small locos tend to be built down to a price point, because they're often marketed as entry-level models (or, in the case of more obscure things like industrials, the price is kept low because manufacturers aren't certain of the market).  And adding DCC and stay-alive to a low-priced model results in a disproportionate increase in the RRP compared to doing the same with a loco that costs more to start with.

 

Sorry Mark, I was typing my response when you posted this.

 

It's true most decoders will not operate Stay Alives on analogue, but ZIMO's are smarter than most and can distinguish between a power-out and a deliberate voltage reduction to reduce speed.

 

If you've never used a ZIMO, there are probably many other high end features as standard that other brands only dream of. LOL.

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

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On 08/11/2019 at 01:45, The Johnster said:

The Rustons never operated on signalled or track circuited running lines (unless someone can come up with a BR licensed example) as they were strictly industrial locos for use in private sidings and yards.  This goes for most industrials, including Pecketts, Andrew Barclays. Janus, and Sentinels.  There were some Hunslet Austerity type 0-6-0STs licensed for use on BR running lines in the North East of England, but by and large industrials work on their own sidings and main line locos come into the exchange sidings as far as the stop board.  

 

 

 

 

DS1169, was a 48DS used by the Southern Region at the p-way depot at Broadclyst.  It was regularly to be seen going down the main line to Exmouth Junction, and when it moved to Yeovil Junction it went under its own power.

 

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I should have specified that I was discussing privately owned industrials and not BR owned Rustons; my bad.  Industrials have to be licensed and carry a licence plate to be used on BR running lines, and their drivers must have the appropriate road and Rules and Regs knowledge.  Industrials working on to BR sidings, as opposed to running lines, were a matter of local arrangements

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11 hours ago, Butler Henderson said:

Its down to the "potential" of the electrical supply - all insulators will at some point breakdown and allow electric flow. Potentially its risky trying it with paper as the likely outcome is the paper catching fire.

Sounds rather alarming.

 

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11 hours ago, MarkSG said:

 

it's a stay-alive chip.

Is that some kind of a battery? How on earth can you fit a battery into a tiny loco like that?

 

I saw a friend drive his 'O' gauge pannier along the cess a few months ago, using an on-board battery, but that seems like a rather different proposition.

 

 

Edited by Captain Kernow
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11 hours ago, JohnR said:

 

Tell him to do DS1169 as well!

 

Do as I intend doing - forthcoming open-cabbed Army version with markings removed; sheet the cab cut-out; and add DS1169 numberplates from 247 Developments.

 

Simples !!

 

Regards,

John Isherwood.

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34 minutes ago, Captain Kernow said:

Meanwhile, Algernon Cuthbertson languished in Bodmin Gaol, dreaming of an escape attempt. ‘Surely Father won’t let me rot in here for ever?’ he pondered.

 

When the current rebuild of Bodmin Gaol (by the Russians!) is completed shortly, there will be very little 'languishing' done there. I expect that it will cost an arm and a leg; (not literally I hope); to walk across the threshold !!

 

(Perhaps the Russians know more than we do? Could it be intended by the Corbyn regime as a luxury resort for the Party faithful)?

 

Regards, with tongue in cheek,

John Isherwood.

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6 hours ago, Captain Kernow said:

Is that some kind of a battery? How on earth can you fit a battery into a tiny loco like that?

 

I saw a friend drive his 'O' gauge pannier along the cess a few months ago, using an on-board battery, but that seems like a rather different proposition.

 

 

I knew a bloke at Canton who’d done that with a real pannier, and it wasn’t battery powered...

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Two more liveries available this month were seen at Gaydon.

 

1182876226_DSCN6108(2).JPG.01541e357d1551b6d0b4f85f01cdab03.JPG

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19 hours ago, pauliebanger said:

As others have pointed out, there's a stay alive capacitor pack

 

 What value capacitor have You fitted for the demo please.  I'm using two or three 330uF stay alives via an SACC 16 just to get over glitches and it helps in keeping the loco cab comparatively clear.

Might be worthwhile explaining that you can also set up the motor cut out time after running of a live section of track to prevent your loco running on and  taking an unintended nose dive off the edge of any  baseboard.

 

I do like these large Mexican produced caps though. They allow one to put on a quite impressive floor show.

 

P

Edited by Porcy Mane
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