Jump to content

Hornby - New tooling - Ruston 48DS 0-4-0


Andy Y
 Share

Recommended Posts

On 07/01/2020 at 09:20, Ruston said:

Yes, If the livery looked newly painted in 1962 then it didn't leave Lincoln painted in that colour. So we can assume it was repainted around the date of that photo.

 

This film shows the loco (I am pretty sure it is the same one) in that livery at Morden in 1954. The shunter appears at around the 8-minute mark and shunts a mix of blue and silver tankers. This is interesting as I had thought that the blue livery was a pre-war thing but the tankers look to have been freshly painted.

 

https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-the-daily-round-the-story-of-milk-production-and-distribution-1954-online

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, PhilJ W said:

So its powerful enough to shunt three loaded milk tankers then.

 

Barely! The standing joke was that this loco could not pull the skin off a rice pudding (which I guess shows what "in-jokes" are like if you work in the dairy industry :P ).

 

Interestingly, this rather fuzzy shot shows the same loco (or a very similar one) also worked the creamery at Chard in 1959. This is interesting as I thought Chard was a Unigate facility.

 

979356_orig.jpg

Edited by Karhedron
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, Karhedron said:

 

Barely! The standing joke was that this loco could not pull the skin off a rice pudding (which I guess shows what "in-jokes" are like if you work in the dairy industry :P ).

 

Interestingly, this rather fuzzy shot shows the same loco (or a very similar one) also worked the creamery at Chard in 1959. This is interesting as I thought Chard was a Unigate facility.

 

979356_orig.jpg

That one is technically not a 48DS. It is a 44/48HP, in Ruston's classification scheme and pre-dates the 48DS. The cab and cab steps are different, and the wheel diameter was 3 ins. smaller than the 48DS. It's most probably W/n 186032, ex-works 3/4/1937, delivered new to Wiltshire United Dairies at Chard. That shot is interesting as I have a works photo of it on test in Lincoln and in a cream-coloured livery, with the Wilstshire United Dairies logo on the cab. It's clearly no longer in that livery here but it does appear to be lined. I seem to remember someone saying that it wasn't actually delivered in the cream livery, so perhaps that's true and it was repainted in the standard lined green before delivery.

 

If anyone can design and produce cab front, rear and sides, plus step etches it would be a nice and easy conversion of the Hornby 48DS (I'm sure we can ignore the slight difference in wheel diameter). I measured one up some years ago, and also have a drawing, if anyone is interested in producing these parts.

Edited by Ruston
  • Informative/Useful 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 08/01/2020 at 13:16, Stubby47 said:

A slightly re-worked Ruston...

 

blue_ruston_3.jpg.20c5bf3dc44a16019db5daab4a1085b9.jpg

Looks brilliant! 

Can't wait to see some of the other liveries people repaint the locos into!

Personally I've just stripped the Army branding from the MOD one, just looks like generic industrial now!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
19 minutes ago, OliverRowley said:

Looks brilliant! 

Can't wait to see some of the other liveries people repaint the locos into!

Personally I've just stripped the Army branding from the MOD one, just looks like generic industrial now!

 

What did you use to strip the branding off? T-Cut?

  • Like 2
  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 25/12/2019 at 17:24, Porcy Mane said:

 

 

I've done three now. All but one fell off once the two screws had been removed. The screws enter two cast spigots on the cab floor that engage in matching recesses in the outer chassis block. The tight one had a bit of leverage help with a no. 17 wedge blade and upon inspection seemed to have an excess of paint on the cab bottom.

 

BUT  before attempting to remove the cab I first remove the front buffer beam moulding. This locks the  separate bonnet/cab assemblies in place  via the flange along the top of the buffer beam.

 

Happy Crumble,

P

 

Going back to the removal of cab and engine cover from the frames - do you have any pictures at all? I've got the chassis block out of another one, have removed the cab screws and still the cab won't part from the frames and engine cover and I can't see what's preventing it from coming away as it rattles now the screws are out and so is clearly not itself attached to anything anymore. Is the engine cover glued to the frame?

  • Like 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • RMweb Gold
On 09/01/2020 at 08:06, JohnR said:

I guess I'll have to wait another year for DS1169.... however, the Express Dairy model looks so cute, I think I will have to have one! At this rate I'll have a collection.

If you can repaint one in green, or remove lettering from a factory-finished green version, 247 Developments will sell you DS1169 plates. 

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Ruston said:

Is the engine cover glued to the frame?

 

Coincidentally I've just DCC'd another two this morning. One was as you describe. I strip em out of curiosity. One bonnet was well glued one side only and the loose cab wouldn't release. There are eight spigots on the bonnet section. Four into the running plate & four into the cab front. I had to resort to a new Swan Morton 17 blade firmly pushing the corner of the blade between running plate and bonnet, right at the centre moulded joint line between the bonnet doors. Good glue as the paint came away with the bonnet. managed to keep the spigots/tabs intact and all then fell apart.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Porcy Mane said:

 

Coincidentally I've just DCC'd another two this morning. One was as you describe. I strip em out of curiosity. One bonnet was well glued one side only and the loose cab wouldn't release. There are eight spigots on the bonnet section. Four into the running plate & four into the cab front. I had to resort to a new Swan Morton 17 blade firmly pushing the corner of the blade between running plate and bonnet, right at the centre moulded joint line between the bonnet doors. Good glue as the paint came away with the bonnet. managed to keep the spigots/tabs intact and all then fell apart.

Thanks. I gave up on it as I thought I'd end up breaking something.

 

I've weathered this one to be in its original livery but faded, damaged and dirty after many years of service.

 

48dsweathering2-007.jpg.e2ba5b6ff81937b20f0fd3860aadd319.jpg

  • Like 12
  • Craftsmanship/clever 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Ruston said:

Thanks. I gave up on it as I thought I'd end up breaking something.

 

I'll get some pix. A couple of phots will explain far better than my inane ramble above. It will probably be after the weekend though.

 

P

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 07/01/2020 at 09:14, Porcy Mane said:

 

No. Kapton is a bl**dy good heat insulator. NASA used it as thermal blanketing. It's long term use is questionable due to degradation over time under certain circumstances. It's properties have been a major contributory factor in a number of aircraft losses. Having said that we're just talking model railways here and I use it all of the time but when I've used it around decoders I tend to check it regularly for signs of singeing.

Didnt the US Air Force buy some Harriers and when they found out they had Kapton wiring the whole lot were grounded (some immediately on delivery) and then systemically stripped for spares for the earlier (non Kapton) aircraft, such was the lack of trust in the Kapton insulated aircraft.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 08/01/2020 at 22:46, Ruston said:

That one is technically not a 48DS. It is a 44/48HP, in Ruston's classification scheme and pre-dates the 48DS. The cab and cab steps are different, and the wheel diameter was 3 ins. smaller than the 48DS. It's most probably W/n 186032, ex-works 3/4/1937, delivered new to Wiltshire United Dairies at Chard. That shot is interesting as I have a works photo of it on test in Lincoln and in a cream-coloured livery, with the Wilstshire United Dairies logo on the cab. It's clearly no longer in that livery here but it does appear to be lined. I seem to remember someone saying that it wasn't actually delivered in the cream livery, so perhaps that's true and it was repainted in the standard lined green before delivery.

 

If anyone can design and produce cab front, rear and sides, plus step etches it would be a nice and easy conversion of the Hornby 48DS (I'm sure we can ignore the slight difference in wheel diameter). I measured one up some years ago, and also have a drawing, if anyone is interested in producing these parts.

Sounds like a job for Planet industrial's   

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

On ‎08‎/‎01‎/‎2020 at 22:20, Karhedron said:

 

Barely! The standing joke was that this loco could not pull the skin off a rice pudding (which I guess shows what "in-jokes" are like if you work in the dairy industry :P ).

 

Interestingly, this rather fuzzy shot shows the same loco (or a very similar one) also worked the creamery at Chard in 1959. This is interesting as I thought Chard was a Unigate facility.

 

979356_orig.jpg

The loco at Chard carried the UD (United Dairies) logo. UD became part of, or was rebranded as, Unigate Creameries.

 

John

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, ikcdab said:

I understand this is the Chard United Daries shunter, now resident at williton. 

20181002_134318.jpg

No, this is the one that Hornby are doing in the Grant Rail livery. When built this would have not had the enclosed cab and the windows are definitely non-standard. They were probably done in the ownership of Grant Lyon Eagre. The axle guards are also the early, cranked, type and so the Hornby model is going to be wrong.

 

 32600977117_a901f4985b_b.jpg 

The above shows it in Grant Rail's livery, which Hornby are doing it in but without the windows and axle guards, it will be wrong for this loco. Grant Lyon Eagre had another 48DS that was a standard enclosed cab type, which, with slight alteration to the earlier Grant Lyon Eagre livery, would make an accurate model.

 

 

  • Informative/Useful 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...