Jump to content

Andy Y

Hornby - New tooling - Ruston 48DS 0-4-0

Recommended Posts

A small amount of T-cut on a cotton bud rubbed gently on the branding should do the trick. But dont rub to hard and wash the residue off afterwards. DO NOT use nail varnish remover on plastics.

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
On 10/01/2020 at 19:17, Ruston said:

I gave up on it as I thought I'd end up breaking something.

 

A picture:

 

48DS-Hornby-061-Edit.jpg.465e7e7ee4a612430ae0fb2c823cd999.jpg

 

P

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
  • Informative/Useful 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/01/2020 at 22:46, Ruston said:

That one is technically not a 48DS. It is a 44/48HP, in Ruston's classification scheme and pre-dates the 48DS. The cab and cab steps are different, and the wheel diameter was 3 ins. smaller than the 48DS. It's most probably W/n 186032, ex-works 3/4/1937, delivered new to Wiltshire United Dairies at Chard. That shot is interesting as I have a works photo of it on test in Lincoln and in a cream-coloured livery, with the Wilstshire United Dairies logo on the cab. It's clearly no longer in that livery here but it does appear to be lined. I seem to remember someone saying that it wasn't actually delivered in the cream livery, so perhaps that's true and it was repainted in the standard lined green before delivery.

 

If anyone can design and produce cab front, rear and sides, plus step etches it would be a nice and easy conversion of the Hornby 48DS (I'm sure we can ignore the slight difference in wheel diameter). I measured one up some years ago, and also have a drawing, if anyone is interested in producing these parts.

Sounds like a job for Planet industrial's   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anyone is interested Bouys toys in cromer still has full range but doesn't do mail order 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand this is the Chard United Daries shunter, now resident at williton. 

20181002_134318.jpg

Edited by ikcdab
Correctrd spellings
  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎08‎/‎01‎/‎2020 at 22:20, Karhedron said:

 

Barely! The standing joke was that this loco could not pull the skin off a rice pudding (which I guess shows what "in-jokes" are like if you work in the dairy industry :P ).

 

Interestingly, this rather fuzzy shot shows the same loco (or a very similar one) also worked the creamery at Chard in 1959. This is interesting as I thought Chard was a Unigate facility.

 

979356_orig.jpg

The loco at Chard carried the UD (United Dairies) logo. UD became part of, or was rebranded as, Unigate Creameries.

 

John

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, ikcdab said:

I understand this is the Chard United Daries shunter, now resident at williton. 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2020_01/20181002_134318.jpg.3b0f81894ada192a2d7922e6f9891fed.jpg

No, this is the one that Hornby are doing in the Grant Rail livery. When built this would have not had the enclosed cab and the windows are definitely non-standard. They were probably done in the ownership of Grant Lyon Eagre. The axle guards are also the early, cranked, type and so the Hornby model is going to be wrong.

 

 32600977117_a901f4985b_b.jpg 

The above shows it in Grant Rail's livery, which Hornby are doing it in but without the windows and axle guards, it will be wrong for this loco. Grant Lyon Eagre had another 48DS that was a standard enclosed cab type, which, with slight alteration to the earlier Grant Lyon Eagre livery, would make an accurate model.

 

 

  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Ruston said:

No, this is the one that Hornby are doing in the Grant Rail livery. When built this would have not had the enclosed cab and the windows are definitely non-standard. They were probably done in the ownership of Grant Lyon Eagre. The axle guards are also the early, cranked, type and so the Hornby model is going to be wrong.

 

 https://farm8.static.flickr.com/7908/32600977117_a901f4985b_b.jpg 

The above shows it in Grant Rail's livery, which Hornby are doing it in but without the windows and axle guards, it will be wrong for this loco. Grant Lyon Eagre had another 48DS that was a standard enclosed cab type, which, with slight alteration to the earlier Grant Lyon Eagre livery, would make an accurate model.

 

 

Maybe it's too early in the morning,  but I don't quite understand. The loco at williton we have always referred to as the United dairies shunter. I think it came to us in the late 1970s. I can't now remember. If that isn't right,  what is the origin of the williton loco?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Ruston said:

No, this is the one that Hornby are doing in the Grant Rail livery. When built this would have not had the enclosed cab and the windows are definitely non-standard. They were probably done in the ownership of Grant Lyon Eagre. The axle guards are also the early, cranked, type and so the Hornby model is going to be wrong.

 

 https://farm8.static.flickr.com/7908/32600977117_a901f4985b_b.jpg 

The above shows it in Grant Rail's livery, which Hornby are doing it in but without the windows and axle guards, it will be wrong for this loco. Grant Lyon Eagre had another 48DS that was a standard enclosed cab type, which, with slight alteration to the earlier Grant Lyon Eagre livery, would make an accurate model.

 

 

The first thing I would do is replace the flat wagon body with a hopper body. Is that a pump fitted to the hopper wagon?

23 minutes ago, ikcdab said:

Maybe it's too early in the morning,  but I don't quite understand. The loco at williton we have always referred to as the United dairies shunter. I think it came to us in the late 1970s. I can't now remember. If that isn't right,  what is the origin of the williton loco?

The one being produced by Hornby is the Express Daries shunter based at Morden.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, ikcdab said:

Maybe it's too early in the morning,  but I don't quite understand. The loco at williton we have always referred to as the United dairies shunter. I think it came to us in the late 1970s. I can't now remember. If that isn't right,  what is the origin of the williton loco?

The one in your photo quite clearly has the works number painted on the side. It also has the unique cab, so it must be 200793. The photo that I posted above isn't mine (it's a link that posted itself as a picture) but I photographed this loco in GLE's plant yard, in Scunthorpe, in the 1990s. The Industrial Railway Society's 13EL hanbook (published 2003) lists it as still being in Scunthorpe at time of going to print, so either you're mistaken as to when it arrived at Williton, or you have had another 48DS there that did arrive in the 1970s.

 

As far as I'm aware, 200793 never worked for United Dairies. It was new to Wm. Evans, Old Mills Collieries at Radstock. Another thing about this one, and which without pre-cab rebuild photos I can't be certain of, is that it may actually have been a 44/48HP when new.

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve just got a copy of Railway Bylines volume 10, issue 9 from August 2005.
 

There’s  an article on Chard and a picture of the Ruston shunter at the United Daries, later Unigate factory in 1962.

 

The caption says: “From 1937 to 1987 the factory had its own diesel shunter which moved the bulk tank wagons to and from an exchange siding.  In 1962 the factory’s loco was 48hp Ruston & Hornsby four wheeler W/No.183062 which had come new to the site in 1937.  After being replaced by another Ruston & Hornsby circa 1974, it was saved for preservation by the West Somerset Railway.  It later went to the Gwili Railway where it was named Folly”

 

//Simon

Edited by Stentor
  • Like 1
  • Informative/Useful 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Stentor said:

I’ve just got a copy of Railway Bylines volume 10, issue 9 from August 2005.
 

There’s  an article on Chard and a picture of the Ruston shunter at the United Daries, later Unigate factory in 1962.

 

The caption says: “From 1937 to 1987 the factory had its own diesel shunter which moved the bulk tank wagons to and from an exchange siding.  In 1962 the factory’s loco was 48hp Ruston & Hornsby four wheeler W/No.183062 which had come new to the site in 1937.  After being replaced by another Ruston & Hornsby circa 1974, it was saved for preservation by the West Somerset Railway.  It later went to the Gwili Railway where it was named Folly”

 

//Simon

IIRC the later Ruston at Chard Junction was the larger 88hp type.

 

John

  • Like 1
  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/01/2020 at 09:17, Ruston said:

No, this is the one that Hornby are doing in the Grant Rail livery. When built this would have not had the enclosed cab and the windows are definitely non-standard. They were probably done in the ownership of Grant Lyon Eagre. The axle guards are also the early, cranked, type and so the Hornby model is going to be wrong.

 

 https://farm8.static.flickr.com/7908/32600977117_a901f4985b_b.jpg 

The above shows it in Grant Rail's livery, which Hornby are doing it in but without the windows and axle guards, it will be wrong for this loco. Grant Lyon Eagre had another 48DS that was a standard enclosed cab type, which, with slight alteration to the earlier Grant Lyon Eagre livery, would make an accurate model.

 

 

Could this be the ruston before the rebuild. Taken at the grant lion location in scunthorpe.  

FB_IMG_1579453727587.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, gpplumy said:

Could this be the ruston before the rebuild. Taken at the grant lion location in scunthorpe.  

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2020_01/FB_IMG_1579453727587.jpg.9727d54411089f0f46262b183ea54f1e.jpg

It's possible but, according to the IRS's 1987 Existing Locomotives book, Grant Lyon Eagre had four 48DS, one of which was a very close works number to 200793. 200796 was another and as the one in the photo has the cranked axle guards it could be 200793, which we know has them, or it could be 200796. Do you know when the photo was taken?

 

The cab being given a real bodge job of being lowered could have been reason to replace it with the one that 200793 now has but the odd thing about the one in the photo is that it is the keyhole type cab but with aluminium RH plates all-round. That type of cab seems to have gone out of production before the use of plates, rather than transfers, so it's a bit of a mystery. If it were in preservation I could imagine someone screwing plates to an old loco, because that's the sort of silly thing that preservationists to to industrial locos, but I can't imagine anyone in industry wasting their time doing it. Perhaps it went back to Lincoln for repair at some time and the plates were added then?

 

There is a photo of another of GLE's Rustons, in previous ownership, in  an issue of the Industrial Railway Record. I'll see if I can find it and will compare.

  • Informative/Useful 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Ruston said:

It's possible but, according to the IRS's 1987 Existing Locomotives book, Grant Lyon Eagre had four 48DS, one of which was a very close works number to 200793. 200796 was another and as the one in the photo has the cranked axle guards it could be 200793, which we know has them, or it could be 200796. Do you know when the photo was taken?

 

The cab being given a real bodge job of being lowered could have been reason to replace it with the one that 200793 now has but the odd thing about the one in the photo is that it is the keyhole type cab but with aluminium RH plates all-round. That type of cab seems to have gone out of production before the use of plates, rather than transfers, so it's a bit of a mystery. If it were in preservation I could imagine someone screwing plates to an old loco, because that's the sort of silly thing that preservationists to to industrial locos, but I can't imagine anyone in industry wasting their time doing it. Perhaps it went back to Lincoln for repair at some time and the plates were added then?

 

There is a photo of another of GLE's Rustons, in previous ownership, in  an issue of the Industrial Railway Record. I'll see if I can find it and will compare.

I'll see if I can find any more information on it dave !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A quick question regarding DCC. I've got a small Zimo 6-pin deocer to fit.  The wires going into the little thing that looks a bit like a decoder on the model, as bought - are they plugs that can be pulled off the pins on this thing and pushed on to the pins of the decoder, or do I have to cut the wires off and solder them to the decoder pins?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Ruston said:

A quick question regarding DCC. I've got a small Zimo 6-pin deocer to fit.  The wires going into the little thing that looks a bit like a decoder on the model, as bought - are they plugs that can be pulled off the pins on this thing and pushed on to the pins of the decoder, or do I have to cut the wires off and solder them to the decoder pins?

 

 

Yes, it's a 6-pin socket, with a blanking chip fitted. Just unplug the blanking chip, and pop the decoder in.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jrb said:

 

 

Yes, it's a 6-pin socket, with a blanking chip fitted. Just unplug the blanking chip, and pop the decoder in.

 

But get it the right way round.

For some reason Hornby's assemblers have decided to transpose the motor wiring and the pick-up wiring at the connector from the standard. (Doesn't make any difference) Just make sure you get pin one on the decoder to the outer connector with the wire on it.  Connecting it the wrong way shouldn't damage the decoder, just nowt will happen.

 

48DS-Hornby-041-EditSm.jpg.8bc9b7afaa290f82f91bfbba3fd6f348.jpg

 

pin 1 Orange Motor Right

pin 2 Grey Motor Left

pin 3 Red Right Rail

pin 4 black Left Rail

pin 5 White Front Headlight (F0)

pin 6 Yellow Rear Headlight (F0)

  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ruston said:

A quick question regarding DCC. I've got a small Zimo 6-pin deocer to fit.  The wires going into the little thing that looks a bit like a decoder on the model, as bought - are they plugs that can be pulled off the pins on this thing and pushed on to the pins of the decoder, or do I have to cut the wires off and solder them to the decoder pins?

 

I have 2 Rustons and have different decoders in each.  The first decoder is the Guagmaster DCC93 fits well the other decoder is a Bachmann 6pin which is 4.5mm longer than the Guagemaster  decoder coming in at 14.5mm  yet still fits without a problem. Both are direct fit without a harness.

Edited by johnd
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It all went a bit wrong. I pulled on the plug and two wires came out of it. So I tried to solder the wires to the pins but the pins just fell off. Then I soldered the wires to the blobs of solder, where the pins were and it worked - until one wire came off. When I tried to solder it back on I ended up soldering two blobs together. The decoder is now scrap.

 

  • Friendly/supportive 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.