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TexChem

First Attempt 00-SF

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I decided two or three years ago to have an attempt at building my own turnouts - bought gauges, copper clad and some BH rail.  Then, like many on here, life intervenes, confidence fluctuates, motivation ebbs and flows - nothing happened.  This Christmas I took some time off work, closed all of my work related software (specifically email) and spent quality time with my family, which included some modelling time.  As part of this modelling time, I pulled out the gauges, rail and copper clad and had a go.  I made two B6 turnouts (using standard templot templates - no messing around, just set to 00-SF) - here they are.

 

I have not yet gapped them, tried them electrically or put in tie bars - but they seem to operate ok when I had push through a short wheel base wagon.  The curved turnout may need a little fettling in the diverging road, but I was quite pleased with them for my first attempts. 

 

I have to say it is really addictive and I want to replace all the turnouts on my layout - not sure I am ready to do it, but.........

post-16941-0-11825200-1547143962_thumb.jpg

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A good start and if you use a mini drill gapping should not take too long before your turnouts will be working. Building your own turnouts and crossings does give you more freedom in layout design and like many things in life your ability increases each time you build a new one.

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This looks like the results I got before discovering the "short model switches" in Templot. This is very small radius stuff from a full size point of view and the REA switches don't produce the best result for a model. Have a look at the same B6 turnout and change the switch setting to 1 in 24 model - you will see what I mean. The GW loose heel switches produce similar results.

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This looks like the results I got before discovering the "short model switches" in Templot. This is very small radius stuff from a full size point of view and the REA switches don't produce the best result for a model. Have a look at the same B6 turnout and change the switch setting to 1 in 24 model - you will see what I mean. The GW loose heel switches produce similar results.

 

Hi Michael,

 

Unless space is very tight, I would generally suggest a 1:32 switch for a 1:6 turnout, especially for a curved turnout.

 

The short model switches are at template > switch settings... menu item:

 

post-1103-0-14993500-1547197660.png

 

The 1:24 switches are mostly intended for shorter turnouts such as 1:5.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

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Looking good, can I ask what width of sleeper you have used as it does look like the narrow sleeper for plain track or is it a trick of the camera, should be 4mm wide for turnouts.

Just remember, practice makes perfect but don't rush it and you'll soon be making stuff like this.

 

post-10324-0-61409400-1547198489.jpg

 

Dave.

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Hi Michael,

 

Unless space is very tight, I would generally suggest a 1:32 switch for a 1:6 turnout, especially for a curved turnout.

 

The short model switches are at template > switch settings... menu item:

 

attachicon.gifshort_switches.png

 

The 1:24 switches are mostly intended for shorter turnouts such as 1:5.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

 

Thanks Martin, yes, I think that might be better - I was just trying to point the track builder away from REA switches. I usually fish about with switch settings until I get the flowing result I want, remembering that we are using much tighter curves than full size railways ever would.

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I appreciate all the encouragement and feedback.  These are just my first attempts and I am unlikely to use these on my layout - I am learning how to fabricate the parts, put them together and wire them up.

 

Mike/Martin - appreciate the tips, time permitting will have a go this weekend.

 

Dave - I purchased the copper clad from Clover House (I am in the US and this is US-based company), they are 3 mm, I believe, and so they are narrow.  While I am in the learning phase, I am not overly concerned about this, but when it comes time to do them for use, then I will have to worry about it then.

 

Tex

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Tex

 

I think you will find that certainly in the UK most modellers have little knowledge about trackwork. It might be down to the fact that for years we have been using H0 scale track and that the main supplier fails to use the correct width timbers for 4 mm scale on their most popular ranges. In addition the turnouts and crossings are designed to seamlessly to join together to create formations.

 

To start off with the most important thing is to get something that works, and if there is an issue how to rectify it. Then in time as your skills improve more ambitious projects can be tackled. Most of all just enjoy what you are doing

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Your first attempts look very promising and has been said by others, practise makes it better, as you get into a rhythm.

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Just an update about gauge availability at C&L

 

Phil has in stock the following gauges for 00sf

 

Roller track gauges, check rail gauges and 3 point gauges. I also had a chat with both Phil and the supplier about wing rail gauges which is now being looked into

 

A reminder that the 00sf check rail gauges can also be used for standard 00 gauge

 

A new website is nearly ready to go live and hopefully will solve all the on going issue with the orders

 

THIS IS A MUST WHEN ORDERING FROM C&L IN THE SHORT TERM

 

After placing the order you must phone Phil to confirm the delivery address, see below especially if orders are outstanding

 

A Tip, have a chat whether you want to receive in stock items and wait for out of stock or wait till the full order can be sent

 

 

Taken from the C&L home page

 

Due to technical difficulties I am unable to do any administration work within the website this includes stock numbers, pricing and the printing of orders from 19739 dated 21-09-2018.
I do have a work round on these orders which can be placed as usual and follow the same payment process, but it is essential that you call me during my normal office hours with your order number. If you come across stock item reading zero please call me.
Apologies for the inconvenience caused, a new website is being worked on but currently do not have an implementation date.

 

Update

 

Phil hopes the new website will go live in the next week or so

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The points look very good for a beginner. If you're using bullhead rail, make sure you get it the right way up. For rail joinder I've tried a packet of the new Peco b'h joiners and they do work and look the part. They're also easier to use than the solder-on type! Keep up the good work, I'm sure you'll find a use for those 2 points.

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Dave - I purchased the copper clad from Clover House (I am in the US and this is US-based company), they are 3 mm, I believe, and so they are narrow. 

 

Hi,

 

If you call the guy at Clover House he can make them any width you want. (He's not far from here.)

 

Cheers,

Andy

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they are 3 mm, I believe, and so they are narrow.  While I am in the learning phase, I am not overly concerned about this, but when it comes time to do them for use, then I will have to worry about it then.

 

 

Not a bad start - you are right about the narrowness and they do look a little lightweight - 4mm wide would be better - I'd save any 3mm you have for plain track panels (except for the end-panel sleepers for which 4mm is more appropriate - the 60' panels I've done have 2 of such at each end). 

 

Once ballasted and weathered to reduce the contrast between ballast and sleepers, the slimness of the sleepers may not be so obvious - if you do want to thicken them you could try gluing some 20thou (0.5mm) thick strip along each edge - I don't know what thickness PCB you've used, but there should be something in the Evergreen range that matches - I'm guessing that 0.5 x 1.5mm would be close.

 

Although I've only used C&L plastic components, so I never have this problem, I'd suggest on the next ones gapping them before you solder them together - only to save any accidents with the gapping tool from scratching the rail surfaces. 

Edited by sharris

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Using materials to hand is a good economic way of trying something out, the next thing once you have checked it works is to explore how to improve the item on the next build, both in construction techniques and visually

 

Perhaps using one of the Templot templates made to both the scale and gauge you work in may assist visually 

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Not a bad start - you are right about the narrowness and they do look a little lightweight - 4mm wide would be better - I'd save any 3mm you have for plain track panels (except for the end-panel sleepers for which 4mm is more appropriate - the 60' panels I've done have 2 of such at each end). 

 

Once ballasted and weathered to reduce the contrast between ballast and sleepers, the slimness of the sleepers may not be so obvious - if you do want to thicken them you could try gluing some 20thou (0.5mm) thick strip along each edge - I don't know what thickness PCB you've used, but there should be something in the Evergreen range that matches - I'm guessing that 0.5 x 1.5mm would be close.

 

Although I've only used C&L plastic components, so I never have this problem, I'd suggest on the next ones gapping them before you solder them together - only to save any accidents with the gapping tool from scratching the rail surfaces. 

 

Timbers for pointwork are 12" wide (4mm), this is because many of the chairs have to be screwed down at an angle. Ordinary sleepers are narrower but the chairs are always in line with them.

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I appreciate the continued comments and helpful information and I will, when the time comes, make a call about the "timber" widths to get something more appropriate.  Had a water leak this past w/e, so no modelling - we have a holiday this Monday, I am going to try out the suggestion of using the short model switch and see how it turns out.

 

I did not mention that I had widened the gauge to 16.5 mm at the ends of each of the switches to connect with regular track.  I will not do that the next time and see how things go. 

 

Tex

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Just an update about gauge availability at C&L

 

Phil hopes the new website will go live in the next week or so

 

Hi John,

 

C&L web site updated today, referring to cyber attack:

 

 http://www.finescale.org.uk/

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

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Martin

 

A bit dramatic !!  More like the old software is giving lots of issues

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I appreciate the continued comments and helpful information and I will, when the time comes, make a call about the "timber" widths to get something more appropriate.  Had a water leak this past w/e, so no modelling - we have a holiday this Monday, I am going to try out the suggestion of using the short model switch and see how it turns out.

 

I did not mention that I had widened the gauge to 16.5 mm at the ends of each of the switches to connect with regular track.  I will not do that the next time and see how things go. 

 

Tex

With copper clad construction it is recommended to widen the gauge as you did this time. Clearly if it is complex switching it only needs to be done where it meets plain track.

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With copper clad construction it is recommended to widen the gauge as you did this time.

 

Who is doing this recommending? My recommendation is to transition the gauge on the end of the flexi-track (by softening the chairs with heat, or replacing them entirely). That leaves the pointwork as 16.2mm throughout (for smoother running, predictable switch opening gap, the ability to change the design around if you change your mind after building it, and to re-use it later on a new layout).

 

p.s. if you do go for 16.5mm through the switch section, please IGNORE my suggestion to use the thickness of a 20p coin to set the switch opening -- it needs to be wider for 16.5mm.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

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Nice start. I really need to make a start on making pointwork sometime.

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Who is doing this recommending? My recommendation is to transition the gauge on the end of the flexi-track (by softening the chairs with heat, or replacing them entirely). That leaves the pointwork as 16.2mm throughout (for smoother running, predictable switch opening gap, the ability to change the design around if you change your mind after building it, and to re-use it later on a new layout).

 

p.s. if you do go for 16.5mm through the switch section, please IGNORE my suggestion to use the thickness of a 20p coin to set the switch opening -- it needs to be wider for 16.5mm.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Don't have a 20 p coin - what about US currency?

 

Actually, I might have one somewhere.

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Don't have a 20 p coin - what about US currency?

 

Actually, I might have one somewhere.

 

It's 1.7 mm (0.067") thick which is slightly less than a Quarter (1.75 mm).

Edited by AndyID

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It's 1.7 mm (0.067") thick which is slightly less than a Quarter (1.75 mm).

 

What, even at today's exchange rate?? :)

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