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Oxford Rail announce J27 at Toy Fair


Andy Y
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51 minutes ago, gr.king said:

If there are no current pick-ups fitted to the tender, and if you don't need the facility for electronic toys and artificial chuffing sounds, then why not eliminate the problem of the coupling bar entirely? Cut the un-necessary bridging wires, join the ends in the appropriate pairs, and couple the loco and tender using a simple hook and goalpost arrangement...

 

It picks up from the front and centre axles on the tender. 

 

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10 minutes ago, gr.king said:

You could still ditch the coupling bar and keep the wires.

 

Or make the coupling bar from double sided copper clad and use the coupling bar as wires. You can never have too many pick-ups.

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Just returned my second J27 to Rails.

The first had a bent drawbar (probably fixable) but the motor was dead. Just picked up the replacement today and was in a worse state. The inner plastic tray that the loco sits on was broken allowing the loco to move around nice and freely resulting in various parts getting broken off, the drawbar was again bent and the drawbar pin snapped off.

I would like to say that Rails were most apologetic and very helpful in arranging the returns, so full marks to them.

This is the second Oxford loco I have had problems with, I had to return an N7 as the motor sounded like a washing machine full of bricks. Oxford do seem to be able to design excellent models for a good price but on my experience they are letting themselves down with poor quality control. I would happily pay another £5-£10 if it meant more checks to ensure the models are of better quality.

Sorry if this comes over as a bit of a rant but I am a little bit miffed.

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16 minutes ago, CrossCountryLine said:

Just returned my second J27 to Rails.

The first had a bent drawbar (probably fixable) but the motor was dead. Just picked up the replacement today and was in a worse state. The inner plastic tray that the loco sits on was broken allowing the loco to move around nice and freely resulting in various parts getting broken off, the drawbar was again bent and the drawbar pin snapped off.

I would like to say that Rails were most apologetic and very helpful in arranging the returns, so full marks to them.

This is the second Oxford loco I have had problems with, I had to return an N7 as the motor sounded like a washing machine full of bricks. Oxford do seem to be able to design excellent models for a good price but on my experience they are letting themselves down with poor quality control. I would happily pay another £5-£10 if it meant more checks to ensure the models are of better quality.

Sorry if this comes over as a bit of a rant but I am a little bit miffed.

I don't blame you. It's incredibly frustrating, especially when you've been hit multiple times by issues.

 

My second J27 has as mentioned a bent drawbar, I've just straightened it, but it's a pain of a job, and to add to it, the tender pin screw thread in the boss is stripped. Unspectacular runner too. The J21 bodied Bachmann C-class is in a different league of smoothness. 

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My J27 arrived yesterday. Had the loco tender coupling issue but easily bent to relieve the pressure. Seems to run very well so far. The cab windows look worse because of the way Oxford has painted the edges of the windows cream as this higlights the fact the windows are slightly too small and spaced a fraction too wide. First job will be to remove the glazing and paint all the edges black.

Andrew

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3 hours ago, gr.king said:

I hope nothing important and difficult to repair snaps when you try that.

 

I bet it falls apart.  :smile_mini:

 

There's a 4 pin JST connector under the tender so both electrical and mechanical separation from the chassis/body should be simple. As long as the factory haven't been over zealous with the adhesive the rest should be easy.

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Side glazing came out easily. Spectacle glazing is one piece but I was able to just push in the front glazing so I could carefully paint around the edges.

 

I've painted the inside of the cab black as I remain to be convinced the interior of the cab of a mineral engine would be any other colour. The body disassembled easily - a screw under the smokebox and a screw beneath the piece of insulating tape under the front of the cab. Just need to be careful with the reverser and sandbox operating rods.

 

Andrew

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2 hours ago, Woodcock29 said:

Side glazing came out easily. Spectacle glazing is one piece but I was able to just push in the front glazing so I could carefully paint around the edges.

 

I've painted the inside of the cab black as I remain to be convinced the interior of the cab of a mineral engine would be any other colour. The body disassembled easily - a screw under the smokebox and a screw beneath the piece of insulating tape under the front of the cab. Just need to be careful with the reverser and sandbox operating rods.

 

Andrew

Sorry Cabs were top half Red, bottom Black , photo in Big Four in Colour of a J24 and J25  without Tenders.

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Might that in fact be reddish brown, rendered as red by the early colour photographic emulsion? As mentioned in a dedicated cab colours topic elsewhere, Ken Hoole's notes in "An Illustrated History of NER Locomotives" suggest that the North Eastern used reddish brown for cab interiors after discontinuation of the elaborate wood-grained finish, so might the same practice have continued at Darlington after 1923?

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2 hours ago, micklner said:

Sorry Cabs were top half Red, bottom Black , photo in Big Four in Colour of a J24 and J25  without Tenders.

That might be the case for locos fresh from overhaul as shown in the photo you reference but I can't imagine they stayed very red for long on mineral train duty. I'm quite happy with my black cab interior for a loco that's going to be weathered in due course

Andrew

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Listed for education purposes only. Ex works @ Darlington Works 1938

 

fullsizeoutput_38db.jpeg.f37dce5e007ac12ee41583a4d151fb21.jpeg

 

As Grame has already said perhaps a Red Brown shade. Colour film of that era is well known as unreliable as to actual shades. What is does confirm is the Top half of the Cab is "Red " .

I cannot think of  any reason why any Loco Cab interior colour would become Black due to simply working Mineral trains. 

Darlington Works were well known for "doing their own thing " in pre war LNER days , Cab interiors, Buffer colours and Engine Classifications on the Bufferbeam being three obvious examples.

 

The preserved J27 today is Cream on the upper half of the cab, Black bottom half with a planked Wood Roof space .

 

 

1882260358_lnerj27cab.jpg.271b878dc9c12fc38b46fbadb727e60d.jpg

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30 minutes ago, micklner said:

I cannot think of  any reason why any Loco Cab interior colour would become Black due to simply working Mineral trains. 

 

I think it fair to say, despite the best efforts of any conscientious crew a cab interior would become "grimy".

 

https://flic.kr/p/2kQzumn

 

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3 hours ago, micklner said:

Listed for education purposes only. Ex works @ Darlington Works 1938

fullsizeoutput_38db.jpeg.f37dce5e007ac12ee41583a4d151fb21.jpeg

What is does confirm is the Top half of the Cab is "Red " .

True, Mick. But it also confirms that it looks black in the shade, so painting model cabs black looks like the best way to go.  

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51 minutes ago, Daddyman said:

True, Mick. But it also confirms that it looks black in the shade, so painting model cabs black looks like the best way to go.  

Sorry the logic of what you have said ,has totally lost me.

 

On that thinking the LNER/NER interiors of Cabs were painted Half Red and Half Black .  2037 shows "Red" Nearside corner  and the rear section of the Offside. 1843 also shows the Nearside Corner as "Red" as well. It would appears to be a very sunny day,hence the dark shadow elsewhere inside the Cabs.

 

I know what colour mine are now being painted. I will leave it at that !!.

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With the cab side sheets being assembled from separate upper and lower sections then filled and stoppered on the outside prior to final painting; maybe it's just that the inside of the uppers  are painted in red lead and the photographer has just caught them the opportune moment?

 

Just saying lyke.

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12 hours ago, Porcy Mane said:

With the cab side sheets being assembled from separate upper and lower sections then filled and stoppered on the outside prior to final painting; maybe it's just that the inside of the uppers  are painted in red lead and the photographer has just caught them the opportune moment?

 

Just saying lyke.

A good point. Though it's not the first time I've seen this claim that they were red. I suppose it's possible that the other people making this claim were going by the same photo... 

 

Anyway, mine will continue to be painted "shadow" colour. 

 

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3 hours ago, Daddyman said:

A good point. Though it's not the first time I've seen this claim that they were red.

 

Should we start on the inside of frames & inside motion being painted red to assist crack detection next?

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Another question in relation to the LNER version No 1010. I'm presuming for a pre war version it wouldn't have the rivetted smokebox that the model has?

Andrew

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On 13/07/2021 at 22:43, Woodcock29 said:

Another question in relation to the LNER version No 1010. I'm presuming for a pre war version it wouldn't have the rivetted smokebox that the model has?

Andrew

Arthur K has answered my question on Wright Writes and advises its highly unlikely they had visible rivets pre WW2.

Andrew

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