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Dinghams couplings - well done

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Ordered a pack of couplings yesterday morning, they had arrived before I got home from work today. Really impressive service, now to get them fitted to locos in time for Yate

 

A big thank you to Dingham.

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https://albionyard.wordpress.com/2018/12/29/notes-from-the-man-cave-getting-to-grips-with-dinghams/

Rich, you might find this of use, I’ve got high 90% reliability now. I’d suggest the latch filled with solder rather than the etched latch from my experience.

Brgds

Thanks

 

Reading your blog post was one of the bits that pushed me in this direction

 

One thing I am struggling to grasp is the point of the latch, my thinking being that I would activate the magnet then leave it on while the loco moves away (and then turn it off). As such there is no way for it to decouple during coupling.

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I think Dinghams are a frequently overlooked system, when one of the magazines did an overview of systems they didn't get a mention at all.  When my roundy-roundy was up I had started using a system where the loco number's last digit related to the type of Dingham:-

 

 

Passenger Tender

Even number – Loop on tender, bare hook on front.     Odd number – Hook on tender, bare hook on front

 

Tanks

Even number – Loop on bunker, hook on front.    Odd number – Hook on bunker, loop on front

 

Freight Tender

Even number – Loop on tender, hook on front.    Odd number – Hook on tender, loop on front

 

I have too many locos and so the layout's premise was a loco shed with a passing main line and staging/fiddle yard where locos and train direction could be changed.  So I would run the same train hauled by a variety of locos running them light to and from the shed.  There was also a bit of shunting in the shed area using the delayed facility.  I just need to know which type of loco to send off to couple up.

 

I really struggled using the couplings long tank engines (2-6-4Ts), coaches and long wheel-based wagons but the dodge I saw on here where the loop is replaced with a wider version in wire helped a lot (I still had issues, but as these vehicles were rarely shunted, I didn't try tweaking them which might have cured the problems).

 

Alan

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One thing I am struggling to grasp is the point of the latch, my thinking being that I would activate the magnet then leave it on while the loco moves away (and then turn it off). As such there is no way for it to decouple during coupling.

 

The latch is there to stop the loop re-engaging the hook, once it has been lifted, thus providing a delayed uncoupling action. You can put one electromagnet at the throat of a yard, for example, which can then be activated at the appropriate moment while a train is being backed into a siding. This allows you to uncouple a wagon/rake of wagons on the move which you can then leave at some point beyond where you have uncoupled it.

 

HTH,

David

Edited by Kylestrome

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The latch is there to stop the loop re-engaging the hook, once it has been lifted, thus providing a delayed uncoupling action. You can put one electromagnet at the throat of a yard, for example, which can then be activated at the appropriate moment while a train is being backed into a siding. This allows you to uncouple a wagon/rake of wagons on the move which you can then leave at some point beyond where you have uncoupled it.

 

HTH,

David

Thanks, so in order to recouple it needs to be over the magnet to open the latch?

 

Logically then if you are just planning to uncouple over the magnet, there is no need to fit the latch?

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Thanks, so in order to recouple it needs to be over the magnet to open the latch?

 

Logically then if you are just planning to uncouple over the magnet, there is no need to fit the latch?

 

No, you can couple anywhere (though curves can be an issue, depending on the radius) the loop pushes the latch up, riding up the front of the hook.  The front of the loop is angled slightly to facilitate this.  If you don't want to delayed uncoupling you could indeed dispense with the latch and even fit links or a screw coupling to improve the appearance.

Edited by Buhar

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Thanks, so in order to recouple it needs to be over the magnet to open the latch?

 

Logically then if you are just planning to uncouple over the magnet, there is no need to fit the latch?

 

No. When coupling up, the loop slides up the hook, pushes itself under the latch and then drops down over the hook. You can couple up anywhere on the layout and only need the magnets to uncouple.

 

Dinghams are no different in principle to Alex Jacksons, DGs or any other auto couplers with delayed action. Their main advantage (apart from automatic coupling and the ability to be uncoupled on the move) is that they fit straight into a slot where a coupling hook would normally be, they're fairly unobtrusive and have a 'railway like' appearance.

 

David

 

PS. Have a good read of the instructions – they explain everything far better than I can.  :yes:

Edited by Kylestrome

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I'm starting to fit them to my 7mm stock. if anyone knows the best way of fitting them to a Dapol Terrier with out digging holes in it?

 

Marc  

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I've also just started a trial fitting of Dinghams to my stock as I try to get Wheal Elizabeth up and running again.

 

The various links (especially Paul's and David's) have been very helpful but I still have a couple of queries:

 

- The instructions don't mention whether to solder the dropper to the dropper hanger on the looped coupling or just to rely on hooking the wire around the hole - any views? does it make a difference?

 

- The suggestion is that they aren't very reliable with sprung buffers - some of my stock is so fitted as I was originally thinking about using AJ's - is this a real issue so that I need to fix these buffers solid or something that is simply a would be better if they were avoided?

 

Any advice from experienced users gratefully received.

 

Thanks

 

Jeremy  

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I've also just started a trial fitting of Dinghams to my stock as I try to get Wheal Elizabeth up and running again.

 

The various links (especially Paul's and David's) have been very helpful but I still have a couple of queries:

 

- The instructions don't mention whether to solder the dropper to the dropper hanger on the looped coupling or just to rely on hooking the wire around the hole - any views? does it make a difference?

 

- The suggestion is that they aren't very reliable with sprung buffers - some of my stock is so fitted as I was originally thinking about using AJ's - is this a real issue so that I need to fix these buffers solid or something that is simply a would be better if they were avoided?

 

 

 

Any advice from experienced users gratefully received.

 

Thanks

 

Jeremy

 

Hi Jeremy,

 

Do not solder the droppers. They have to be able to move freely in order for them to work as designed. As for sprung buffers, most 4mm buffers are too heavily sprung to make much difference so I’d be inclined to leave well enough alone unless there is an obvious problem. I’ve been using Dinghams for at least fifteen years now and have been very satisfied with them, ( usual disclaimer) any problems have been related to set up so it does pay to be careful with the initial mounting.

 

Cheers,

 

David

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One thing I have found so far is that it seems the hole for the hook in RTR bufferbeams wildly varies between models, even more so once kits get added to the mix.  Lots of adjustment needed to get them all the same height.

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