Jump to content

chuffinghell

Adding coal and fire irons

Recommended Posts

I’ve always had a negative view of my own abilities so adding coal to a loco has always filled me with dread as I’ve always been afraid of ruining a perfectly good loco

 

however after doing it on my 58xx and getting positive comments from you guys I’ve made a start on my other locos starting with my 57xx

 

I’ve also weathered a set of fire irons and a bucket which I’ve glued in place with glue n glaze (dries clear and surplus just wipes away)

 

D36A0DB1-C6A4-45A1-8084-B7E57956268B.jpeg

AD18637E-8B07-4019-B039-69E594A766A0.jpeg

Edited by chuffinghell
  • Like 7
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Decided to add sand to the bucket, it looked like the loco was carrying a pale of milk 

D934CE99-63B7-4923-9BFA-75960250A0D2.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why is the bucket filled with sand?

The various references I have seen made in driver's and firemen's memoirs refers to them being filled with water for washing in.

 

Gordon A

  • Agree 2
  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gordon A said:

Why is the bucket filled with sand?

The various references I have seen made in driver's and firemen's memoirs refers to them being filled with water for washing in.

 

Gordon A

 

I wasn’t sure what the bucket contained so took a guess and got it wrong

 

I’ve since removed the offending item and I’ve done another one but this time I’ve dropped in a blob of enamel clear gloss in the hope it looks like water once it’s cured

Edited by chuffinghell
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/02/2019 at 15:49, Gordon A said:

Why is the bucket filled with sand?

The various references I have seen made in driver's and firemen's memoirs refers to them being filled with water for washing in.

 

Gordon A

 

Hasn’t photographed very well but here is take two

 

had to use the flash to try and show the ‘reflection’ in the water....dirty water :blush:

 

663BBA6D-A80B-48EF-B4E5-102FB94E1AD2.jpeg

 

Edited by chuffinghell
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great. I always think adding those details brings a model to life - one of these days, I'll get around to adding them to mine.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, HonestTom said:

Looks great. I always think adding those details brings a model to life - one of these days, I'll get around to adding them to mine.

 

Thank you

 

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/02/2019 at 18:08, chuffinghell said:

 

Hasn’t photographed very well but here is take two

 

had to use the flash to try and show the ‘reflection’ in the water....dirty water :blush:

 

663BBA6D-A80B-48EF-B4E5-102FB94E1AD2.jpeg

6C84DF22-BABC-4023-8389-59CA320A55A2.jpeg

I have a feeling that the bucket wouldn't be carried with water in it, one because I suspect it would not have much in it after the first rough rail joint and secondly there is no reason to carry it full, after all the engine has thousands of gallons onboard, so the bucket can be filled when needed and possibly with hot water too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, JeremyC said:

I have a feeling that the bucket wouldn't be carried with water in it, one because I suspect it would not have much in it after the first rough rail joint and secondly there is no reason to carry it full, after all the engine has thousands of gallons onboard, so the bucket can be filled when needed and possibly with hot water too!

 

:(

 

These castings are virtually solid so it was a case of trying to disguising this, hence the incorrect use of sand in the first instance

 

Oh well! failed again

 

bucket.JPG

 

If anyone asks it rained heavily the night before

 

Edited by chuffinghell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I may have been able to acquire some empty/hollow buckets instead of the solid casting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 09/02/2019 at 12:48, chuffinghell said:

I’ve always had a negative view of my own abilities so adding coal to a loco has always filled me with dread as I’ve always been afraid of ruining a perfectly good loco

 

After seeing your work here, I hope you've now seen your negative view was misplaced. :)

Edited by 57xx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 57xx said:

 

After seeing your work here, I hope you've now seen your negative view was misplaced. :)

 

Thats good of you to say, it’s very encouraging 

 

thank you

 

chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Real coal in bunkers/tenders and coal wagons is one of the cheapest, easiest, and most effective ways of improving the look of an RTR steam loco.  It 'lifts' the model instantly, and the addition of tools and buckets is another very cheap and effective way of making a loco look less like a product and more like a model.  But be warned, Chuffinghell, this is the top a very steep and slippery slope; you'll end up scratchbuilding broad gauge singles with full working inside motion if you aren't careful!

 

Excellent stuff.  Your next move should be IMHO to consider etched brass numberplates.

 

Buckets were carried empty, and could be used for all sorts of things in a working day.  Fresh and hot water for washing was available on the footplate, and sand lives in the sandboxes though the bucket may well be used to replenish them.  Firemen's bicycles were hung from the fire iron hooks as well on occasion.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Your next move should be IMHO to consider etched brass numberplates.

 

Buckets were carried empty, and could be used for all sorts 

 

Unfortunately I can’t seem to find anyone who supplies buckets that are not sold castings

 

I have started to add etched brass number plates to some of my locos

1AE33B6F-572B-4555-9C69-FBD88CF912D4.jpeg

 

90ECA53E-4B94-448B-B919-053A8A8597D5.jpeg

Edited by chuffinghell
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't mind sacrificing the handle (which you can add again afterwards with a bit of wire), just get a small drill bit and drill down the bucket. Select a size that is smaller than the bottom of the bucket and go slowly!

 

Andy G

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, uax6 said:

If you don't mind sacrificing the handle (which you can add again afterwards with a bit of wire), just get a small drill bit and drill down the bucket. Select a size that is smaller than the bottom of the bucket and go slowly!

 

Andy G

 

I had already tried to move the handle out of the way to drill a hole but of course the handle broke off

 

I’ll have a look at adding a wire handle although my skills are limited

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd drill a really small hole through each side of the bucket and thread a bit of 0.45 brass wire through the holes. If you do it so that the handle is inside the bucket the wire will push outwards holding itself in place.

 

Andy G

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Chuffinghell,

 

I think your loco's look really good with added coal and the weathering of 5814 look really good. The advice regarding the bucket is really good, I'm sure a 0.5m or smaller drill will do the job and the handle should just snap into place. 

Regarding fire irons and tools, I think you have used Springside Models castings, or perhaps Craftsman? These are all good but also 247 Developments make a nice etched brass set which is very fine (F16 is the part number I think).

 

Good luck and keep coaling.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard b

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, 30368 said:

Hi Chuffinghell,

 

I think your loco's look really good with added coal and the weathering of 5814 look really good. The advice regarding the bucket is really good, I'm sure a 0.5m or smaller drill will do the job and the handle should just snap into place. 

Regarding fire irons and tools, I think you have used Springside Models castings, or perhaps Craftsman? These are all good but also 247 Developments make a nice etched brass set which is very fine (F16 is the part number I think).

 

Good luck and keep coaling.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard b

 

Thanks Richard,

 

I’ve decided for the time being to abandon the use of a bucket

 

youre quite right I’ve used springside castings

 

Chris

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Went about doing my 64xx a little different

 

The current load is part of the cast weight with a pronounced ‘hump’

 

I’ve never been a big fan of over filled bunkers (personal preference) so instead of just gluing coal on top of the existing load I removed the casting (secured with two screws under the cab) and filled it flat-ish with a slight fall towards the cab

 

refitted and added the coal afterwards

 

118EBFDC-D082-4687-92F4-B0DDF8FEB998.jpeg

79D4291E-6D13-401D-BFA3-98F1A9356A91.jpeg

590505D3-02B0-4315-9247-1A1E1C222BF3.jpeg

 

78D4CC8A-FD98-40B9-9290-995D25F3D6A4.jpeg

 

Doesn’t look much different at the moment but I’ve only put the coal in dry, I’ll glue it in place once the loco has been weathered

Edited by chuffinghell
Poor spelling corrected

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.