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Peco Twistlock Turnout Motors

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I picked up a copy of the Peco News Spring Report 2019 from Hatton's last Saturday and saw an interesting new design of turnout motor inside on page 3. Looks like an interesting concept.

Cheers Paul

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2 minutes ago, Colin_McLeod said:

How does it work differently from the existing point motor?

it comes with a hole drilling template - the underboard fixings are screwed in place, the point motor positioned under the board with the drive rod through the tie bar of the point and then twist locked in place on the underboard fixings

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6 hours ago, Butler Henderson said:

Can understand the below board version but what benefits does it offer above board?

Saves bending underneath the boards, if the design is good it can be camouflaged to fit in, not to mention if the motor is connected to the point via rodding, then it is almost protoypical. Incidentally, DCC Concepts do a prototypical point motor and rodding, though I have yet to test this one out.

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2 hours ago, Francis deWeck said:

Saves bending underneath the boards, if the design is good it can be camouflaged to fit in, not to mention if the motor is connected to the point via rodding, then it is almost protoypical. Incidentally, DCC Concepts do a prototypical point motor and rodding, though I have yet to test this one out.

What I meant was what benefits does a twist lock point motor offer above board?

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14 hours ago, Butler Henderson said:

What I meant was what benefits does a twist lock point motor offer above board?

 

That it actually twists and locks in place?

Apparently there's no need for difficult installation/lining up and should make replacement easy and quick. Other than that there's not a lot of info from Peco - I didn't notice anything on their website or current RM (although there was a page in the March issue (which featured a pre-production item).

 

G

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58 minutes ago, grahame said:

 

That it actually twists and locks in place?

You still have to accurately fix the fixings in place so seemingly more difficult than using PL-11

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1 hour ago, Butler Henderson said:

You still have to accurately fix the fixings in place so seemingly more difficult than using PL-11

 

It doesn't look any more difficult (although that it to be tested/confirmed) but once in place it should be a lot easier to change a failed one.

 

G

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There is no information about polarity the frog of the turnout.

I use Tortoise motor and there is two switchable contacts.

Or did i missed something about Peco new turnout motor? :locomotive:

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On 16/03/2019 at 18:39, Anders63 said:

There is no information about polarity the frog of the turnout.

I use Tortoise motor and there is two switchable contacts.

Or did i missed something about Peco new turnout motor? :locomotive:

I seem to remember there's 2 versions--one suitable for a microswitch to be fitted and one with one already installed.

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Advertised and previewed in this month's RM, with a promise of a how-to article soonish.  Having recently fitted PL-11s clipped into the point for the first time, which involved many naughty words, this sounds good to me, especially if there's a template provided, presumably so you can drill the board from above before screwing the lugs in from below.  Pre-fitted cable looms also appeal to me, as the thought of taking a soldering iron anywhere near point motor coils brings me out in a rash …..

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Hi.....

Wondering whether these motors can be fitted to points which are already laid, wired up and either at the moment 'hand of god' or wire in tube thrown....converting such without lifting point...?

 

Regards always...

Bob

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Hi Bob

 

For under-baseboard use, I don't see how you could drill the hole in the baseboard needed for the operating pin without lifting the point.  Surface fitting I guess would depend on whether you could position it clear of other trackwork and scenery, which from the picture in RM wouldn't be easy in many situations ….  Not that I've got one yet ….

 

Chris

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On 19/10/2019 at 21:43, BobM said:

Hi.....

Wondering whether these motors can be fitted to points which are already laid, wired up and either at the moment 'hand of god' or wire in tube thrown....converting such without lifting point...?

 

Regards always...

Bob

 

You could fit the motor under the baseboard offset from the point and connect the operating pin to a suitable length of wire-in-tube.

 

Darius

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One of these point motors was on display at the Peco event at Harburn Hobbbies in Edinburgh today.  It looks much as described - a template is provided to drill three holes from the top of a baseboard - pins are then put in the outer two, the centre hole is for the rod connecting the motor to the point tie-bar and then the motor is twisted and locks onto the other two pins.  Electrical connection is through three pre-fitted wires that are connected to a momentary switch or an accessory decoder for solenoid point motors. According to Peco, they should be in the shops during November (but with no guarantee that they will be on sale at Warley), and suitable for N to O gauge.  So they look very convenient if you don't want to crawl under a baseboard to fit and adjust a PL-10  motor or similar, although the basic Pl-1000 is more expensive, with a RRP of £12,00.  

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Video is up on the PECO YT page with fitting instructions

 

 

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On 19/10/2019 at 22:43, BobM said:

Hi.....

Wondering whether these motors can be fitted to points which are already laid, wired up and either at the moment 'hand of god' or wire in tube thrown....converting such without lifting point...?

 

Regards always...

Bob

 

On 03/11/2019 at 20:05, Chimer said:

Hi Bob

 

For under-baseboard use, I don't see how you could drill the hole in the baseboard needed for the operating pin without lifting the point.  Surface fitting I guess would depend on whether you could position it clear of other trackwork and scenery, which from the picture in RM wouldn't be easy in many situations ….  Not that I've got one yet ….

 

Chris

 

It can be done, although it's a bit heart in mouth time!

Drill through the centre of the tiebar from above with a 1mm drill, keeping it straight obviously, and that gives you a pilot hole underneath the baseboard, then drill upwards very carefully with a brad/spur point drill bit of say 4mm, until you are through the baseboard top.

I have used this method with copperclad tiebars and amazingly only broke one, so I would think the plastic Peco tiebar would be a little more forgiving.

 

image.png.6a07c5e2009e19c03a0de1a4680b1694.png

 

Mike.

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9 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

 

It can be done, although it's a bit heart in mouth time!

Drill through the centre of the tiebar from above with a 1mm drill, keeping it straight obviously, and that gives you a pilot hole underneath the baseboard, then drill upwards very carefully with a brad/spur point drill bit of say 4mm, until you are through the baseboard top.

I have used this method with copperclad tiebars and amazingly only broke one, so I would think the plastic Peco tiebar would be a little more forgiving.

 

image.png.6a07c5e2009e19c03a0de1a4680b1694.png

 

Mike.

 

Just a little hint to add to the above. If doing this, it iis useful to wrap some tape round the drill bit at the measurement which equates to the thickness of the board (or board plus cork ballast).

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On ‎16‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 08:00, Joseph_Pestell said:

 

Just a little hint to add to the above. If doing this, it iis useful to wrap some tape round the drill bit at the measurement which equates to the thickness of the board (or board plus cork ballast).

And, to be doubly safe, slip an old and expendable steel rule under the vulnerable bit of the point whilst doing it.

 

Unless your ballast is concrete hard it shouldn't be difficult to do so. Afterwards, just a few drops of dilute PVA should easily re-secure any that gets disturbed.

 

I'd also suggest using a 6mm drill in preference to the 4mm suggested in an earlier post. The latter will barely accommodate the travel of a solenoid point motor.

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
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On 16/11/2019 at 07:50, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

 

It can be done, although it's a bit heart in mouth time!

Drill through the centre of the tiebar from above with a 1mm drill, keeping it straight obviously, and that gives you a pilot hole underneath the baseboard, then drill upwards very carefully with a brad/spur point drill bit of say 4mm, until you are through the baseboard top.

I have used this method with copperclad tiebars and amazingly only broke one, so I would think the plastic Peco tiebar would be a little more forgiving.

 

image.png.6a07c5e2009e19c03a0de1a4680b1694.png

 

Mike.

 I use a 7mm hole to allow for the throw of the tie bar

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7 hours ago, Dunsignalling said:

And, to be doubly safe, slip an old and expendable steel rule under the vulnerable bit of the point whilst doing it.

 

Unless your ballast is concrete hard it shouldn't be difficult to do so. Afterwards, just a few drops of dilute PVA should easily re-secure any that gets disturbed.

 

I'd also suggest using a 6mm drill in preference to the 4mm suggested in an earlier post. The latter will barely accommodate the travel of a solenoid point motor.

 

John

 

1 hour ago, JohnDMJ said:

 I use a 7mm hole to allow for the throw of the tie bar

 

Apologies for being a little "optimistic" with the drill diameter, having only drilled holes (both from above correctly and below bodgingly!) on EM copperclad/timber type turnouts, 4mm is adequate, and whilst I don't take issue with your assertation, is 6mm or 7mm required for the amount of point blade deflection on Peco points?

 

Mike.

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17 minutes ago, Enterprisingwestern said:

 

 

Apologies for being a little "optimistic" with the drill diameter, having only drilled holes (both from above correctly and below bodgingly!) on EM copperclad/timber type turnouts, 4mm is adequate, and whilst I don't take issue with your assertation, is 6mm or 7mm required for the amount of point blade deflection on Peco points?

 

Mike.

Not strictly, 4mm is sufficient, but only so long as you line up the hole and point perfectly. A 6mm hole gives a little leeway to avoid the possibility of the rod hitting the edge before the point has gone all the way over.

 

John

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