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My problem is quite simple... I need corrugated iron, lots of it, to clad an industrial building. My problem is the plastic options (wills/slaters etc) always look very thick.

 

In a similar way to making roofs by cutting individual tiles, my aim was to use 'tin foil' and make individual sheets to give a more realistic look that can be tailored.

 

I have so far found two tools which could do the job:

Brunel Models (Australia): https://www.brunelmodels.net/product-page/corrugated-iron-maker1-72

 

As used by Luke Towan: 

 

 

The alternative I have found is this one from the US: http://masterpiecemodels.com/product/corrugating-tool-set-172-scale-mmtl007-19-99/

 

The thing that is putting me off is mainly the cost (including postage!). Are there any more 'local' alternatives to achieve the above?

 

Regards,

Martyn

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About 25 years ago I bought a strip of corrugated iron, I think Walthers or similar,which is some kind of stiff tin or something. I cut strips of cooking foil and place it over the top of the commercial strip, and slide something like a credit card across the top, which presses the foil into the grooves, then cut the strip into panels. I've never needed to buy a second strip of commercial corrugated iron.

 

Its a similar technique to the tool you posted above, but is the tightar5e version of it.

Edited by monkeysarefun
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Another way would be to glue some spaghetti to a bit of card then press some kitchen foil down over it. Alternatively make two peices of card with spaghetti and lay a strip of foil between them and press the top one down evenly.

If you want stiffer foil, ready made disposable roasting trays will be spot on. Just cut the panels from the flat sections.

 

Pete. 

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Genius ideas. Thanks. And when you are finished with the spaghetti glued to some card add one of those little calendars and give it to your Mum on Mother’s Day like we did as kids!

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On 24/02/2019 at 01:45, monkeysarefun said:

About 25 years ago I bought a strip of corrugated iron, I think Walthers or similar,which is some kind of stiff tin or something. I cut strips of cooking foil and place it over the top of the commercial strip, and slide something like a credit card across the top, which presses the foil into the grooves, then cut the strip into panels. I've never needed to buy a second strip of commercial corrugated iron.

 

Its a similar technique to the tool you posted above, but is the tightar5e version of it.

 

Thanks all, I've tried monkeysarefun's idea as a starter but instead using Wills corrugated iron as the master and some thick kitchen foil. The results are good, I like how the rivets are kept in place. I've used a cotton bud instead of a credit card as it seemed to occasional tear, but apart from that it is quite time consuming! I read on another forum a suggestion to spray the back with watered down PVA to give strength to it. As you can imagine it is quite flimsy, but it does allow you to add some individual character to each sheet.

 

10 hours ago, Benbow said:

 

I think the above is a great idea to increase production flow!

20190302_133639.jpg

20190302_133735.jpg

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3 hours ago, ianmacc said:

I wonder how Peco feel about this? 

 

Probably not impressed! It is first generation 3D printing.

 

 

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Great tips here! What materials are people using for the sheets themselves?

 

I've seen people mention the thick aluminium from metal takeaway containers before, and pretty sure I've also seen the metal that caps the top of cork sealed wine bottles recommended! (Both sound like excuses to consume ...)

 

Is it possible to get plain rolls of thicker metal foil? I've noticed that all of the normal Alu foil I've got from supermarkets over the last year or so has had a chequerboard pattern in it - presumably adding strength without thickness in some way? Certainly rules it out for this kind of use.

 

Justin

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19 hours ago, martyn11post said:

 

Probably not impressed! It is first generation 3D printing.

 

 

It is in effect counterfeiting (sort of). Yes the Peco t/a Wills option is expensive but they’ve shelled out for design and production etc. and need to recoup costs. I’m all for ingenious money savers but not at the expense of the manufacturers that are the lifeblood of the hobby.  Probably perfectly legal but on a par with photocopying superquick pavement to make it go further!

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On 05/03/2019 at 07:53, justin1985 said:

Great tips here! What materials are people using for the sheets themselves?

 

I've seen people mention the thick aluminium from metal takeaway containers before, and pretty sure I've also seen the metal that caps the top of cork sealed wine bottles recommended! (Both sound like excuses to consume ...)

 

Is it possible to get plain rolls of thicker metal foil? I've noticed that all of the normal Alu foil I've got from supermarkets over the last year or so has had a chequerboard pattern in it - presumably adding strength without thickness in some way? Certainly rules it out for this kind of use.

 

Justin

 

Hi Justin,

 

I was using Tesco Strong Foil (other brands are available).

 

It has sat in my cupboard for awhile so not sure if newer stuff would have the chequerboard pattern, but I have seen that pattern on some foils in the past.

It is still pretty thin. I was also going to try the thicker takeaway containers and see what the result is. I suspect I will get strength but lose detail.

 

My final option was to try using actual tinplate, you could cut open drinks cans, but I have access to tinplate sheet. Just got to be more careful on the edges!

 

Regards,

Martyn

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On 05/03/2019 at 18:18, ianmacc said:

It is in effect counterfeiting (sort of). Yes the Peco t/a Wills option is expensive but they’ve shelled out for design and production etc. and need to recoup costs. I’m all for ingenious money savers but not at the expense of the manufacturers that are the lifeblood of the hobby.  Probably perfectly legal but on a par with photocopying superquick pavement to make it go further!

 

No it isn't. A counterfeit would be made of the same/similar material, to the same dimensions (as a sheet of Wills) and have the same properties. What is being done with aluminium foil etc is producing something with different properties out of a different material, while using a particular product as an aid to production. Photocopying Superquick papers, on the other hand, would be counterfeiting/breach of copyright, but that's a different matter.

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On 06/03/2019 at 20:30, melmoth said:

 

No it isn't. A counterfeit would be made of the same/similar material, to the same dimensions (as a sheet of Wills) and have the same properties. What is being done with aluminium foil etc is producing something with different properties out of a different material, while using a particular product as an aid to production. Photocopying Superquick papers, on the other hand, would be counterfeiting/breach of copyright, but that's a different matter.

It still doesn’t sit quite right with me. It is for the express purpose of avoiding the need to buy the necessary amount of their product to do a job. It comes down to whether the manufacturer cares of course which I suspect they don’t. 

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Ambis Engineering produce some very nice corrugated sheet in 2, 4 and 7mm scales and it's available direct or from Hobby Holidays. It's only slightly thicker than aluminium kitchen foil though, so it's quite vulnerable where it overhangs eaves and gutters. I had a chat with the chap at Severn Models, whose etched huts feature a really nice representation, with a view to persuading him to produce some sheets. He felt the cost might put most people off, but having wasted quite a bit of the Ambis product I for one would think it a worthwhile investment. He said I wasn't the only one to suggest it so perhaps if enough of us ask......

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On 08/03/2019 at 22:32, ianmacc said:

It still doesn’t sit quite right with me. It is for the express purpose of avoiding the need to buy the necessary amount of their product to do a job. It comes down to whether the manufacturer cares of course which I suspect they don’t. 

Railway companies employ/ed engineers to design and build locomotives at great expense and along comes a guy with a scanning camera who photographs it in great detail and produces a model loco and sells them.

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JTT scenery makes corrugated embossed styrene. One pack gets you 4 sheets and they're a little smaller than A4, so lots of coverage. In my opinion it's the best product for corrugated roofing.

To simulate overlapping sheets I glue a 0.25mm strip above each row, so that the bottom edge of next row will sit 0.25mm above the one below it which gives just enough of a height difference to see the lap without looking too thick.

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There's quite a lot about corrugated iron, modelling and prototype, on the Narrow Gauge Online Forum:  http://ngrm-online.com/forums/

You have to be a member to read it, but it's a quick and straightforward process to join.

Recommended, Dave.

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On 07/04/2019 at 15:39, lightengine said:

Railway companies employ/ed engineers to design and build locomotives at great expense and along comes a guy with a scanning camera who photographs it in great detail and produces a model loco and sells them.

You know very well the difference. 

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On 09/03/2019 at 11:32, ianmacc said:

It still doesn’t sit quite right with me. It is for the express purpose of avoiding the need to buy the necessary amount of their product to do a job. It comes down to whether the manufacturer cares of course which I suspect they don’t. 

I think you are starting from a false assumption. I purchased one pack of the Wills sheets, and immediately realized it is (for me) totally unfit for purpose, i.e. too thick. So, yes I will use this pack to perfect my own alternative, but that is one pack Peco have sold more than I would have purchased if I had realized it was not suitable earlier. 

I would never purchase “the necessary amount of their product to do [my] job”. 

 

Also, as described by other people / links there are plenty of other materials that can be used as a basis for your own creation. 

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Use Wills corrugated glazing and paint it, the sheets are very thin and easy to rust etc

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On 14/04/2019 at 14:41, ianmacc said:

You know very well the difference. 

No, please enlarge.  I see no difference.

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It's actually not illegal or "counterfeiting" or any of those things to produce exact replicas of a model you already own. You can make molds and cast copies in resin, as much as your heart desires, so long as you don't sell what you make. This has been settled in courts countless times. From the issue of "intellectual property" (ie Union Pacific demanding royalties from model makers who use their logo), to the use of locomotive and wagon manufacturer designs to make a model product, down to cloning for home use. All these cases have been heard, and the verdict is; none of it is illegal if it isn't in direct competition. What that means is, Union Pacific isn't in the business of selling model locomotives, so someone using their brand on a derivative work such as a model does not interfere with their railway business.

The real question is; is it ethical? Maybe, it certainly doesn't help the manufacturer who obviously would be thrilled to sell more units, but I suspect if they had the choice between selling "one or none" if that "one" meant their product would be used to make copies, they'd choose selling one all day long.

It certainly isn't "free" either, you have to take the effort to make the mold, buy the materials, cast your copies, then build them into something on your own. People who have the skill and the means to do this are offset by people who do not, or who have no desire to do so, and for those people they'll take advantage of the convenience of buying what they want ready to go out of the box. Then you have the fact that, in all honesty, resin isn't much fun to work with - it warps, it's brittle, you have to use non-solvent adhesives which aren't as good... plastic is most often the far superior material, and manufacturing in plastic is not something people can do at home.

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