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No have not tried it, I do all slicing for my Photon S in Chitubox, which (compared to the versions of Anycubic's Workshop I got with the printer) offers a lot more control over positioning support, now I've got the hang of it. I'd be interested to hear about the ability to divide into different zones with different build settings though, and what other Photon users prefer, specifically to tackle the issues raised in printing railway rolling stock. There are a few snags with printing square, regular objects with sufficient accuracy which your typical mini-figure printer doesn't seem to encounter or be too bothered about. 

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I have had a go at printing the water tower for Brent. The base and tank are separate parts. I have etches to use as overlays on the tanks so the slots are provided for clearing tabs on some details to fit to the etches. The tank had distorted during the build and was slightly too short so is being done again.

 

I used a 0.2mm gap between the bricks a layer thickness of 0.02mm and an exposure time of 7.5 seconds to try and minimise light bleed. The building was grown perpendicular to the build plate. Scale is 4mm:1ft

 

Regards

 

Mark Humphrys

 

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On 20/10/2019 at 00:11, Mark said:

I have had a go at printing the water tower for Brent. The base and tank are separate parts. I have etches to use as overlays on the tanks so the slots are provided for clearing tabs on some details to fit to the etches. The tank had distorted during the build and was slightly too short so is being done again.

 

I used a 0.2mm gap between the bricks a layer thickness of 0.02mm and an exposure time of 7.5 seconds to try and minimise light bleed. The building was grown perpendicular to the build plate. Scale is 4mm:1ft

 

Regards

 

Mark Humphrys

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/AA3A3D62-CC1A-4207-9DFB-B62E141B683C.jpeg.9125ed5e84c01a7a3c7e8d013fd5871e.jpeg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/8F09526E-7642-4E13-A95B-843D8A7D8361.jpeg.723fcfc6adebdedb9a9c631ec19ec03c.jpeg

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https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/B7EC8327-2B69-4DA1-A2BC-5342E84EB38A.jpeg.b3386b723fedd27b64e120a2bf271cba.jpeg

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/605E4E82-EB57-4325-9666-C37AFA54D3F1.jpeg.27ab7a57c97fc1ccd16f37e03b07c87b.jpeg

 

 

I do like that.

 

What programme are you drawing your files in, in particular the brickwork. Is each wall made up of copy and pasting bricks and brick rows each time?

 

I've been trying to come up with an automated (ie lazy..) way   - maybe  using  displacement maps for example  so that I can just click on a wall face and it will be magically covered in a 3D mesh of bricks in a similar  way to the way you can add 2D texture files of bricks etc in various packages  and so on but its been pretty frustrating so far.

 

The best I've come up with up to now is that I've managed to create 3D 'brickpaper' sheets in various brick bonds via a convulated process using Inkscape, 2 versions of Sketchup, Blender and Meshmixer (Yay for free software!)  that I can place over walls that I've cut openings in for windows etc, then trim the 'sheet' to size, and cut out the openings much the same way as you'd create a wall using card and scalescenes sheets but the brickwork above the windows is still a work in progress. 

If you have any secrets you can share I'd love to hear them!

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I use Rhino 3D for my cadds models. The basic structure was created as a solid shell 0.6 mm smaller on each side to allow the bricks to be booleaned on afterwards with a 0.3 mm overhang to allow some depth between bricks for mortar. I did an experiment using 0.15 mm deep on a chimney stack first in the picture below.

 

unfortunately the brickwork is English bond and close examination of the building has required a lot of effort to position bricks to obtain the right position of openings. This means that layers which are predominantly stretchers have the occasional header along the length. I don’t think this can be automated. 
 

i have also started to paint the main structure now.
 


 

Regards

 

Mark Humphrys

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That looks Fantastic Mark. If it helps any, I'm currently laser burning the waiting room at Havenhouse, Lincs. It too is English bond with stretcher layers, and I've noticed on the prototype there is a header in the middle of each stretcher row.

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That is a nice outcome, though I guess my quest to just right click a wall and magically have it ll bricked continues. Bender has that cool feature where you can create a roof  with one click and there it is  covered in your choice of tiles, slates or iron, complete with ridge caps and gutters...

 

Untitled.jpg.0e0db68621cd18d82e05200d2829dfb2.jpg

 

I was hoping for the same kind of thing for walls. II might end up having to dust off my minimal Python scripting skills and try to write my own..

Edited by monkeysarefun

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Hello

 

I am new to this and thinking of getting one of these printers.  I have produced .stl files before using Solidworks several years ago and had them printed by a commercial printer.  However, I no longer have access to this software and needed to download a replacement 3D CAD program.  So I downloaded Blender which has been mentioned but it seems capable of doing complex things way beyond the 3D sketches I want to produce of various railway parts.  I can’t even find how to draw a line or circle with it or find a YouTube video to show me how.  Have I downloaded the wrong software.

 

Regards Les

 

 

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Here you go, Les.  Courtesy of JCL of this parish.  Note that the topic will refer to an older version of Blender.

 

Alan

 

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On 14/10/2019 at 18:51, lyneux said:

Looks great! Is it a 3D print?

Oops, late replying! Yep, body and bogies both printed. Your reference photos were extremely useful! Some major compromises on the bogies made for the small size, but a reasonable approximation at least!

 

On 16/10/2019 at 07:46, Mark said:

Has anybody tried to install the latest Photon S slicing software? It has a number of upgrades the most useful being able to divide the print area into 8 different Build zones which can have different build settings. So you can try 8 different settings simultaneously to optimise your model. 

 

Pretty interesting. Is the Photon S software not just the stripped back version of Chitubox the normal Photon comes with?

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4 hours ago, les101975jud said:

Hello

 

I am new to this and thinking of getting one of these printers.  I have produced .stl files before using Solidworks several years ago and had them printed by a commercial printer.  However, I no longer have access to this software and needed to download a replacement 3D CAD program.  So I downloaded Blender which has been mentioned but it seems capable of doing complex things way beyond the 3D sketches I want to produce of various railway parts.  I can’t even find how to draw a line or circle with it or find a YouTube video to show me how.  Have I downloaded the wrong software.

 

Regards Les

 

 

 

Blender had a cleanup with its 2.8 update and  is easier to use but still very formidable at first sight. Bear in mind its main reason for being is 3D rendering and animation (games and movies) so about 80% of the knobs and buttons you'll never need to learn.

 

For an easier introduction, try tinkercad, onshape or sketchup (all free) they are a lot more user friendly, particularly tinkercad for learning the ropes. Sketchups latest free version is web based but the 2017 version is easly found if you want one that runs as a standalone app rather than having your stuff off in the cloud.

 

Once you've created a file in either there are a few potential issues you might have making it 3D printable (google 'watertightness or manifold in relation to 3D printing) but cross that bridge if and when you come to it - just get stuck in and muck around with the software.

 

Luke Towan, an Australian modeller who (usually except here where he is testign a different brand ..) uses a Photon has a couple of videos out - his latest shows tinkercad as used to build a 3d model of his house. It includes  a handy quick rundown of the resin printing process from turning on the printer to cleaning and curing  the prints if you want a quick rundown.  (has gratuitous skillshare plug but you have to pay the bills I guess...)

 

 

 

Edited by monkeysarefun
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1 hour ago, njee20 said:

Oops, late replying! Yep, body and bogies both printed. Your reference photos were extremely useful! Some major compromises on the bogies made for the small size, but a reasonable approximation at least!

 

Pretty interesting. Is the Photon S software not just the stripped back version of Chitubox the normal Photon comes with?

 

With the Photon S, Anycubic went proprietary for both the electronics and the software. The latest version produces files in a proprietary format too, which is incompatible with the Photon 'classic'. The 'classics' currently in production have quietly adopted the same proprietary motherboard as the 'S'. All this has upset the user community which has expended a lot of energy tweaking the 'classic' firmware and toolchain, and are sceptical about Anycubic's intentions after locking down their machine.

 

The Nim.

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Les, there is also Fusion 360 from AutoCad. As with all 3D software there is a steepish learning curve but there are plenty of videos on YouTube. I used it as it was recommended by my son who is a design engineer, so I didn't compare it with other products. It is cloud based although the files are cached on one's own PC so can work offline. Autocad offer a free subscription to hobbyists so there is a risk that could change.

 

Fusion 360 is especially suitable for home Windows PCs as it uses Microsoft's DirectX 11 supported by the common AMD Radeon and Nvidia GeForce GPUs. I.e. it doesn't need a special graphics card. An 8GB minimum of RAM is recommended.

 

Whilst these 3D packages can export STL they tend to store designs in their own format (.blend for Blender and .F3D for Fusion 360) there may be limits on converting. With Fusion 360 the native file format holds a timeline of the individual steps in building the 3D object whereas the STL is I believe just the finished object. Fusion 360 does export the ISO standard STEP file but I've not used it.

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There are, quite frankly, loads of free CAD packages. Off the top of my head I tried Shapr3D, Blender, Sketch up, Fusion 360, TinkerCAD, 3D Builder and Free CAD. Shapr3D was good if you've got a suitable iPad and Apple Pencil, but it's expensive for the paid version and the free one is very limited. Like Alan I landed on Fusion 360 as being the most user friendly, I liked this guy's tutorials.

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It's funny, I got on with Blender, but never could work with Sketchup. Maybe it's the way my brain is wired. The thing about Blender is that it was built for 3D modelling and animation for movies. There is a load that you wouldn't use, and there are some bits missing (flanges on chimneys are a bit involved), but overall I like it a lot.

 

As some of the others have said, if you want to first work with something really simple, give Tinkercad a go, or if that's too basic, Fusion 360. @chris p bacon got on really well with Tinkercad making chimneys, domes and buffers, and he'll be the first to tell you that he's not really into doing 3D design.

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1 hour ago, JCL said:

@chris p bacon got on really well with Tinkercad making chimneys, domes and buffers, and he'll be the first to tell you that he's not really into doing 3D design.

 

I am a real novice with 3D, I tried Blender but wanted to put my fist through the sccreen, I'm sure it's a brilliant resource but my way of thinking doesn't seem to work with it. I ended up just playing with Tinkercad which I describe as the equivalent of 'Paint by Numbers'. But it works with a bit of care and I was able to produce what I wanted and accurately.

I tried Fusion 360 but there was an issue with the download and in trying to reload I got caught in a catch 22 where it wouldn't let me have the free version to try as I already had it, but it wouldn't work. I'll try again when I have the time to learn. 

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I'd endorse Tinkercad for 3D beginners. Only Sketchup comes close as an intuitive tool. It's the baby brother to Fusion 360, so once you chafe at its limitations the upgrade is relatively painless. And both are free to amateur users.

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