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Allegheny1600

A weekend away in China - 2335 miles in 13.5 hours

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Hi All,

I've been given permission to share with you the experiences of my good friend, James' recent travel adventures in China.

James is usually based in Singapore for work but was recently seconded to Hong Kong for a couple of weeks during which time, he fancied a weekend of riding "Bullet" trains.

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This was to be the itinerary;

Day 1: Train G6502 Hong Kong - Guangzhou (c.50 min, 88 miles)

Day 2: Train G66 Guangzhou - Beijing (8 hours, 1428 miles)

Day 3: Train G9 Beijing - Shanghai (4.5 hours, 819 miles) (the worlds fastest scheduled train at an average speed of 181.4Mph) See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beijing–Shanghai_high-speed_railway

 

Starting off in West Kowloon by boarding one of these beautiful new CRH400 trains that look very smart indeed.

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The interiors look superb!

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(knowing James, this will be "comfortable" class!)

 

Arrival at Guangzhou South, which has 27 platforms dedicated to bullet trains, to see more of these stunners;

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Also, Chinese "Velaro" copies aplenty;

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Okay - I've spent longer composing this than James did riding the first leg! More soon - if there is any interest?

Cheers,

John.

 

Edited by Allegheny1600
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NOTE: I messed up the order of the story somewhat so here we go again!

Saturday had a 10 am departure from Guangzhou, here is James train ready to leave;

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Home for the following eight hours;

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It's a hard life!

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Great food!

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Passing scenery;

 

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Not hanging around!

 

 

Some 8 hours and 1428 miles later, the train approaches Beijing. This is a really immense megacity of some 21.5 million people and still growing. While it is undoubtably 'crowded', the city does spread of an area of 16406 square kilometres, by comparison, London is "only" 1572Km square with a population of 8.1 million so London is considerably denser packed by the figures.

 

 

Edited by Allegheny1600
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Some excellent photography and video there John, from James!

 

The scale of investment, the advanced bullet trains and station designs, plus the amount of rolling stock that is state-of-the-art is impressive.

 

To put that in perspective: we're enjoying Northern Trains chugging along, when they are able to run them, and asset sweated rolling stock from VT.  Add to that the amount of time it is taking to get HS2 underway and you can see, but not necessarily understand, that we have are the poorer relations.  And to think, this last weekend, we were in Rainhill, the location of the world's first scheduled passenger railway!

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I should have been following a similar itinerary last week, but a visa cock-up meant I was confined to HK... next time I hope to do the train.  Certainly beats the internal airlines for comfort

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NOTE: I messed up the order of the story somewhat so here we go again!

Sunday had a 12 am departure from Beijing so there was time for a little trainspotting from a public area outside the station;

 

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This is a Renaissance (CR400BF) train that is very pretty!

 

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Comparison between the two types of CR400 train.

 

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An earlier CRH380A (but not much earlier really).

 

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A Chinese "Velaro" copy approaches.

 

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Shortly afterwards a conventional train passes.

 

Some Chinese high speed trains are very long.

 

As are the conventional trains. This was hauled by a twin unit diesel locomotive.

 

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I am very taken with these sleek machines.

 

This huge yard is just outside Shanghai Hongiao station.

 

Chinese cities are HUGE!

This was a limited stop G express so it didn't slow down at all for this city. It only stopped four times in the 4.5 hours.

 

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Some sort of maintenance being performed - at 220Mph!

 

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REALLY moving!

 

With arrival in Shanghai, James had to take a domestic flight to Shenzen as even Chinese trains couldn't get him back (to HK) in time!

I think I have things in the correct order now if so I'll see if there is the interest to add any further pictures/videos.

Cheers,

John.

 

 

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It does beg the question of which part of the world is developed.... it's not just the rail network, some of the new highways and bridges in China are really rather spectacular, the Shanghai Yangtse crossings for example. 

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On 29/06/2019 at 13:14, jjb1970 said:

It does beg the question of which part of the world is developed.... it's not just the rail network, some of the new highways and bridges in China are really rather spectacular, the Shanghai Yangtse crossings for example. 

 

Developed but at what price ?

 

I wonder what would happen to Chinese NIMBYS whose property happened to be in the way of a new line or road ?

 

 

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