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SD85

Scottish LMS O gauge line in RM, spring 1971

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Hi,

 

Just putting this here because I really can't think of where else to post it.

 

I have had for many years a copy of RM from early 1971 (acquired secondhand) which had an article entitled 'A Scottish O Gauge Line' and featured a system built in a loft by Nigel McMillan. I was wondering 1) what became of the layout and 2) if the builder was still with us today. Despite it being years before my time I always found this layout interesting (I think the main station was called Eastwood Central) and wondered if anyone else recalled it or knew more info about it.

 

Thanks

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All I know was that Nigel McMillan was a well known figure in the Scottish Model railway scene . I think he had a model of the Campbeltown and Macrihanish light railway that I well remember seeing at Model Rail Scotland 1973. I also remember him having a large mining layout that used to be one of the main layouts in the balconied hall for a few years.  I think he had , or perhaps it was his father, 2 or 3 model railway shops  in the Cathcart , Busby and Eastwood areas of Glasgow, so the name Eastwood Central certainly makes sense!   I thought he was fairly old in 1973 (but then to an 11 year old everyone beyond 30 is old) so I'm not sure he is still around .   Sorry don't know anything more than that.

Edited by Legend

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I think Nigel McMillan is still with us but he must be into his 80's. He was an engineer at the North British loco works in the 1950/60s? and has published a book based on his experiences.   As well as his well known model he also had book on the Campbeltown and Macrihanish Railway published.

I do not recall any connection between Nigel and Bill McMillan the owner of the model shops in Glasgow but memory is not infallible!

Malcolm

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I recall an article on a Nigel McMillan layout based around a coal mine with all the appropriate facilities.  I think it was in one of the March Railway Modellers when they used to go a Scottish slant to coincide with Glasgow Model rail.  They seem to have stopped this now.

 

At a guess the issue was around 1974.

 

JG

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23 hours ago, JinglingGeordie said:

I recall an article on a Nigel McMillan layout based around a coal mine with all the appropriate facilities.  I think it was in one of the March Railway Modellers when they used to go a Scottish slant to coincide with Glasgow Model rail.  They seem to have stopped this now.

 

At a guess the issue was around 1974.

 

JG

 

The year was 1976, and the article was called "Moving Coal." . This must have replaced the loft layout.

 

The layout was/is transportable, because its current version, Lyoncross Colliery, was exhibited at Ally Pally a couple of years ago. So I think Nigel McMillan is probably still around  [ I should read threads to the end , where a sighting of him a couple of weeks back is reported...]

Edited by Ravenser

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On 05/03/2019 at 22:58, SD85 said:

Hi,

 

Just putting this here because I really can't think of where else to post it.

 

I have had for many years a copy of RM from early 1971 (acquired secondhand) which had an article entitled 'A Scottish O Gauge Line' and featured a system built in a loft by Nigel McMillan. I was wondering 1) what became of the layout and 2) if the builder was still with us today. Despite it being years before my time I always found this layout interesting (I think the main station was called Eastwood Central) and wondered if anyone else recalled it or knew more info about it.

 

Thanks

I remember that this layout had a triangular very short crossing. Looking at the photo, no leg is longer than 2 wagons!

 

Edit to add.

 

That issue is 1971 March.

Edited by kevinlms
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Thanks all. Yes the triangular crossing was a distinctive part of it. There was a colliery on it too.

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