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wagonbasher

The trams that time forgot

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Couple more videos here:

 

 

 

Spot the tram...

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2 hours ago, 2ManySpams said:

 

Watching it move, it took me a few moments to work out what wasn't right. No overhead wires. There is a third rail but concluded that was for a different gauge rather than power as folk were standing on it! I was torn between batteries and magic but in the end settled on batteries as the power source.

If you read the post immediately above the video you would have seen the answer!

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3 hours ago, melmerby said:

If you read the post immediately above the video you would have seen the answer!

 

Yes, but I took the video and watched the real thing on Sunday. The post mentioning battery power came after that.

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I said that I would model on a number of fronts.

 

Those that know me may have wondered what wagonbasher was doing messing with the steamy mass transit of passengers rather than freight.

 

Well.   There is always room for a bit of freight.

 

All steam tram systems had PW wagons but more about those later...

 

This project was patented and used for a while by the South Staffordshire Tramways,  Local authorities muscled the idea out after a few years (two noisy too much) but for a while this was urban freight on the Black Country Streets. 

 

This is a road rail wagon.

 

The goods would be picked up from the 'supplier' by this horse and cart.  Four equal 3 foot diameter wheels, with what looks like removable sides.    The 'Oss' takes the wagon to the tramway...  No provision for wagon driver looking at the drawing so presumably the Oss and wagon are lead.

 

Once the wagon reaches the tramway,  a steam tram locomotive or the  Oss traction position the wagon over the rails and a second set of wheels, road wheels  are lowered down onto the rails using a windlass on the wagon.  As the rail wheels are lowered onto the rails taking the weight of the wagon they lift the road wheels off the floor.  The steering turntable is locked.

 

A wagon on rails is easier and quicker to pull for the horse, heavier weights, less lumps and bumps from unmade roads.  Once close to the destination the road wheels are lowered back down, the rail wheels lifting up and the steering turntable unlocked.  Then the Oss or a different OSS takes the wagon away from the tramway to the customer.

 

1369523702_roadrailwagonsouthstaffs.jpg.cc911a078329788a46b1e93838a2b2bc.jpg

 

1073183300_southsstaffsroadrailwagon.jpg.590c9801af85b66ce9d949f11348dcb4.jpg

Images from the Kinnear Clarke book from 1894

 

Its not clear what happens to the 'shafts' in transit on the rails as there is nothing on the drawing, I suspect that they would be hinged (they are hinged anyway) upright and strapped in place

 

Andy Duncan has a good range of 7mm horses, carts, wagons, traction engines etc in both white metal and brass.

 

This will form the basis of the road rail wagon model:

 

650872574_coalwagonimage.jpg.63f7198f0e9f91397111067e4ef753d0.jpg

 

I only need the deck, the wheels and the under frame.

 

301166549_coalwagon.jpg.82640f86d8f815bd43f7529c67a73ec2.jpg

 

I can get 'HO' / TT  wagon wheels at 8mm (just over a foot in 7mm) diameter from 'Branchlines', they are the Black beetle range of wheels (just wheels, not Black beetle bogies).  I will need to replace the axles to suite the 24.5mm gauge.  Order for wheels being placed this weekend.

 

Andy

 

 

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The Bessbrook & Newry electric line was another system that used road-rail wagons and that was for most of its existence to transfer coal and linen products between the mills and the port.

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On 14/06/2019 at 13:40, 2ManySpams said:

 

Yes, but I took the video and watched the real thing on Sunday. The post mentioning battery power came after that.

 

Having driven the paved track next to it, there is alot of gravity involved heading down the hill.

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theres  a working kitson tram engine at the Ferrymead Museum in Christchurch

 

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