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And now for something completely different....Dromahair - DJLC


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  • 4 weeks later...
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Now the Tutbury supermeet is over I can drop my focus on Glencruitten and switch my attention to Dromahair.

With only a year and 4 days to Derby I need to get a wiggle on!

 

First job was to source some gauges.

 

Gauges.jpg.f5550593e2254910011275de625eb078.jpg

 

The roller gauge was kindly donate by David Long, and I will be eternally grateful for it!

The crossing nose gauges (although I use for plain track as well) and the back-to-back are by my own fair hand.

Ideally I still need another roller gauge and I would like a check rail gauge but I need a small part for my lathe before I can attack these.

 

I've enough here though to start laying the straight track at the rear of the layout that passes the station platform.

 

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A couple of hours after dinner modelling saw the sleepers going down.

 

One of the advantages of a small layout like this is the boring jobs are completed before boredom really kicks in.

 

196022705_Sleepersdown.jpg.0ce2114d5d120341538769e20fa47da5.jpg

 

Once the holes are drilled for the droppers the rails should be going down.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Apart from wagon building on Glencruitten I've also managed to get the first rails down on Dromahair.

 

255670984_firstrailsdown.jpg.9b50ef0b9245d48efac6de6db61dc32e.jpg

 

I really need to build a wagon chassis before I go too much further though as I will need roll test the pointwork as I build it.

Given the wagons need to be scratch built it may delay proceedings a bit!

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Hi Nick,

 

You are probably right. I doubt the head shunt was ever used in the traditional sense as there would be limited need to run round. The yard would also need to be cleared first which would be quite a faff.

 

The trackwork is scaled off the OS plan though so should be to scale.

The SLNCR's most common engines were 35' long 0-6-4 tank engines so would just about squeeze in.

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17 minutes ago, Argos said:

Hi Nick,

 

You are probably right. I doubt the head shunt was ever used in the traditional sense as there would be limited need to run round. The yard would also need to be cleared first which would be quite a faff.

 

The trackwork is scaled off the OS plan though so should be to scale.

The SLNCR's most common engines were 35' long 0-6-4 tank engines so would just about squeeze in.

think I would be tempted to increase by a few mm and lose part of the signal box  

 

Nick

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Hi Nick,

 

It's a model of a real location. It was built like that.

 

As I've said above I suspect the headshunt was never used as such but rather a means of accessing the back of the siding.

 

There were various unloading points along the siding. A large warehouse, an unloading point for a local flour mill set back from the siding but connected by a short narrow gauge line (bogies were used to transfer grain) followed by the smaller goods shed I am including here. The remainder of the siding was given over to a loading bank.

 

I suspect the loading bank was also used for livestock loading. This traffic created the majority of the revenue for the line and over half the SLNCR's wagon fleet were cattle trucks.

 

The loop here would enable cattle to be loaded and quickly moved onto a train bound north without the need to disturb wagons being unloaded at the mill or warehouses.

 

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The short "neck" is an almost certain indication that the sidings were shunted (to reorder wagons) in between trains, a horse (probably borrowed from a trader) or even humans (with pinch bars) providing the motive power. This was hardly unusual and would have been a common arrangement (although usually without that "neck") even in country goods yards on the British mainland. Just a trifle difficult to replicate in model form, of course.

Edited by bécasse
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Whilst viewing some photos of the SLNCR on the web, I found a photo with what looked like a 14t tank wagon in Shell livery just coming into shot.

 

Hmm thinks I, I've got a Farish version of one of those, at which point the magnitude of my numptyness hit me.

I don't need to build a wagon chassis in order to test the trackwork, I can use a Farish chassis with replacement axles and the wheels spaced for 10.5mm gauge.

 

The tank wagon seemed a suitable candidate but required the brakes to be removed for the wheels to spin.

 

Once that was sorted the trackwork was finished over the course of a few evenings.

 

876607114_trackcomplete.jpg.b6ef4eeb7d63250b02be63078a41cf22.jpg

 

The point is a way off perfect but is the best I've built to date and runs through relatively smoothly.

 

Next I need to install the mechanism.

I have a manual (blue point?) switch left over from an abandoned 7mm scale project.

These are like an unpowered tortoise motor, and was going to be pressed into use on Dromahair,

 

The only snag is that I've used 2"x 1" timber frames which aren't deep enough.

 

1163783355_Pointswitch.jpg.96a0064f6a8294965fb7060dc922f596.jpg 

 

This means I'll have to faff around and mount it horizontally and use a crank to connect to the lever frame.

 

 I found the lever frame at the Gauge O Guild's Telford show a few years ago, broken, bent, tarnished and for sale for a few quid,  A couple hours renovation work brought it back to life  and with three levers will find use at Dromahair (two signals and one point).

 

912140378_leverframe.jpg.7f67bbcb3ef7f2a036a3bc79058d39e4.jpg

 

It will be mounted on a platform at the side of layout.

 

Edited by Argos
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On 15/07/2019 at 21:02, Argos said:

Whilst viewing some photos of the SLNCR on the web, I found a photo with what looked like a 14t tank wagon in Shell livery just coming into shot.

 

Hmm thinks I, I've got a Farish version of one of those, at which point the magnitude of my numptyness hit me.

I don't need to build a wagon chassis in order to test the trackwork, I can use a Farish chassis with replacement axles and the wheels spaced for 10.5mm gauge.

 

The tank wagon seemed a suitable candidate but required the brakes to be removed for the wheels to spin.

 

Once that was sorted the trackwork was finished over the course of a few evenings.

 

876607114_trackcomplete.jpg.b6ef4eeb7d63250b02be63078a41cf22.jpg

 

The point is a way off perfect but is the best I've built to date and runs through relatively smoothly.

 

Next I need to install the mechanism.

I have a manual (blue point?) switch left over from an abandoned 7mm scale project.

These are like an unpowered tortoise motor, and was going to be pressed into use on Dromahair,

 

The only snag is that I've used 2"x 1" timber frames which aren't deep enough.

 

1163783355_Pointswitch.jpg.96a0064f6a8294965fb7060dc922f596.jpg 

 

This means I'll have to faff around and mount it horizontally and use a crank to connect to the lever frame.

 

 I found the lever frame at the Gauge O Guild's Telford show a few years ago, broken, bent, tarnished and for sale for a few quid,  A couple hours renovation work brought it back to life  and with three levers will find use at Dromahair (two signals and one point).

 

912140378_leverframe.jpg.7f67bbcb3ef7f2a036a3bc79058d39e4.jpg

 

It will be mounted on a platform at the side of layout.

 

 

That lever frame is almost as big as the layout, Angus!

 

David

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8 hours ago, DavidLong said:

 

That lever frame is almost as big as the layout, Angus!

 

David

 

Indeed, and probably overkill but I've got it so I may as well use it.

 

And as Nick suggests it is nice to use.

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I just happened across Dr E M Patterson's article on the SL&NCR in the April 1956 Trains Illustrated.  Looking at his photos of the two types of carriage - 6-wheel third and bogie composite - they seem to have the advantage from the constructional point of view of having flat sides with little or no tumblehome and low arc roofs.  The bogie carriage (which was what was in use at the time of his visit in Dec 1955) has a clerestory, though, which would be an added complication.

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Thanks Tom ,

 

I tracked down a copy of that magazine a few months ago.

 

It made for an interesting read, the current scene then was still steam orientated.

 

By the period modelled the clerestories where sheeted over which does reduce the complexity.

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  • 3 weeks later...
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I'm not a big fan of "Oooh look what what I bought!" posts, modelling is about a lot more than opening boxes, part of the process admittedly, but not an end in itself.....

 

So without further ado....

 

Oooh! look what I bought:-

 

236987934_ServiceTimetable.jpg.68690441d6f2774312eaa415c21e93c9.jpg

 

It appeared on ebay for a few quid so was impossible to resist.

 

Sadly it is not an original but a 1968 reprint, which is getting on a bit itself.

 

The Service timetable is a combination of the Working Timetable and the Appendix to the Working Timetable so includes all relevant information for working the line.

The 1936 edition was the final service timetable issued and remained in force right upto the line's closure in September 1957.

 

It includes information regarding signalling (not always intuitive on the SLNCR who, in some instances, mounted multiple signal on one post), train movement, goods handling and much more.

 

One paragraph entitled "Conveyance of eggs" states:- 

 

"Great care must be exercised in the loading of Eggs so that the cases will not shift on the journey. It is very important that this valuable traffic is carried without breakage."

 

I've yet to find the section that describes how grandmothers should treat this load but the fact that Egg traffic merits a paragraph in this document demonstrates  the importance of the traffic.

 

2mm scale egg crates anyone?

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7 minutes ago, nick_bastable said:

sorry but would be  more impressed if you can model the eggs :jester:

 

Nick

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

I do have some 0.2mm solder balls, I wonder if their spherical nature would be noticeable in a crate? 

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I can't believe I'm sat at a computer at 10 o' clock in the evening researching 1950's egg crates.

 

It's weird the place this hobby takes you:-

 

20739323_eggcrate.jpg.b429d66f1b2e56508088496b25e0d528.jpg1544870780_Eggpackingcrates.jpg.5e8f6ac3204a068fcbc21628849659db.jpg892396770_eggsVintage_packing_crate_with_hin_as175a987b-1.jpg.ad2cb4fff4a57fa92caf7663749fab64.jpg

 

It looks like some wooden cases sat on the platform ready for loading would be in order.

 

I suppose one of the lids could be off to reveal the top row of eggs.

 

 

Then again..... I might wake up tomorrow morning sane...............:jester:

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Hi David,

 

I went for the association's code 40 flat bottomed rail.

 

It is slightly over scale but better in appearance than the code 30 plain rail.

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3 hours ago, Argos said:

Hi David,

 

I went for the association's code 40 flat bottomed rail.

 

It is slightly over scale but better in appearance than the code 30 plain rail.

 

Good decision, Angus. That Code 30 is a nightmare. Shame really as it could be very useful for lightly-laid prototype track. I'd be open to using it again if someone could suggest a foolproof method of straightening it in both vertical and horizontal profiles but it defeated me!

 

David

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