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And now for something completely different....Dromahair - DJLC


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On 17/11/2019 at 21:55, Northroader said:

I was curious about the official looking crowd on the platform in that picture. To me it looks like a customs inspection, but as the border is up the other side of Manorhamilton, it couldn’t be?

 

Hi Northroader,

 

I've found another copy of this photo in Neil Sprinks's pictorial of the line.

The caption indicates it was a party saying farewell to a local family who were emigrating, hence the Sunday best and mass of people.

The date is given as 1950 but I am suspicious of this given the neatness of the station and surrounds. 

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I've not made much progress on Dromahair of late as I've been focusing my modelling time on getting Glencruitten ready for the Macclesfield Model Railway Exhibition in mid March.

However, Although these have just arrived in the post and are tempting me to drop everything and dig out the soldering iron:-

 

 

718279898_MGWRwagonetches.jpg.221ca667ef4c96524be6c3c8a7de063c.jpg

 

They are the etches for JM Design's (John M on this forum)  MGWR horse box and refrigerator van kits reduced to 2mm.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/88975-j-m-design-mgwr-horse-box-and-meat-van/

John hasn't merely  reduced the size by 50% but also re-worked the W irons to work with our standard association components.

 

For the uninitiated the Midland Great Western Railway (no &, that was saved for the big island version of a similar name) ran into Sligo which was the southern terminus of the SL&NCR so wagons from the MGWR would be seen working north over the line to Enniskillen. 

 

I'm looking forward to getting started on these but I must contain my enthusiasm until the end of March!

There is something about a virgin, untarnished sheet of etch brass......

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For a quick loco build, you could consider the GSR Sentinels, albeit a bit off-piste for your chosen area.  The P&D Marsh whitemetal kit would be perfect for these as it's been slightly stretched to fit a Farish motor bogie. This means that for an LNER/LMS/GWR loco, the body needs shortening.  However as the GSR locos were longer, the body can be left as-is
 

Class M1 - 280 - Sentinel GSR 0-4-0VBT - built 1927 by Sentinel Waggon Works Ltd. as GSR No.1 - 1927 to GSR No.280 - 1945 to CIE - 1948 withdrawn.

 

Class M1 - 281 - Sentinel GSR 0-4-0VBT - built 1927 by Sentinel Waggon Works Ltd. as GSR No.2 - 1927 to GSR No.281 - 1945 to CIE - 1948 withdrawn.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GSR_Class_280

This does beg the question of finding a suitable chassis.  There is a 16mm wheelbase option in the N-Drive range.  Alternatively, there might be a small Japanese chassis which could be suitable. 

The chassis wouldn't be a difficult scratchbuild and the August 2001 2mm magazine (available from the members area of the 2mm website) shows how to go about it.

Mark

 

 

 

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Thanks Mark,

 

I've never really been a fan of sentinels, the Jinty should suffice for a quick build.

I'm hoping to get a railcar working for June as well.

The Sentinels were more associated with the Limerick area.

If I'm not careful I'll just finish up with a loose collection of Irish prototypes rather than location specific locos (which I want to model).

 

One to bare in mind none the less.

 

Argos.

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Well my Easter hols are here so it's time to break out the MGWR horsebox etch.:clapping_mini::danced:

 

I got two etches for myself and another society member bought a third.

I promised I'd post progress to assist him in his assembly.

 

Firstly the raw etch with the bolts punched out using the half etched holes at the bottom of the sides.1258394421_MGWRhorsebox1.jpg.c7ffb3082982265fcb9069bf3b7f0595.jpg

 

After an hour or so the bead overlays and hinge straps were soldered in place on the ends and one side.

I prefer to do this when the etch is in the flat as I find it easier to manipulate the parts.

 

1704070934_MGWRHorsebox2.jpg.065b70d4d575dac4d19c4bd96ed380bb.jpg

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5 hours ago, Jim T said:

What’s your method for that? I always seem to end up with a lot of cleaning up or dry joints...

 

Thanks Jim,

 

Nothing special,

 

To start with I always make sure the etches are clean, a quick scrub is usually all that is needed but heavy stained brass may need the attention of a soft fibreglass brush.

 

For thin 2mm etches (these are 8 thou or 0.2mm thick) I tin the back of the bead, the apply plenty of flux to the body and the back of the etch bead, hold in place with a wooden stick and solder, making sure the iron is touching both the base etch and the bead.

 

If the etch is thicker then I also tin the underlying etch.

 

It takes slightly longer to solder as there are two pieces of metal to heat but once you've heard the flux sizzle the flash of the solder is not far away.

For any recalcitrant pieces  I sometimes resort to applying a little solder paste from the end of a cocktail stick.

 

A quick once over with a soft fibreglass brush is all that is needed (if you've not been too heavy handed with the solder).

 

I wash and scrub the etch with an old toothbrush at the end of every modelling session.

 

Note: this is how I do it, it works for me, there are many different ways to successfully achieve the same result.

 

My soldering iron is a cheap Chinese temperature controlled iron bought off ebay for about 10 quid.

I use this with the narrowest bit it came with (about 1mm)

I set the temperature to about 325 degrees, I've no idea if that is what the temperature actually is, it just seems to be the setting that works best.

 

To control the amount of solder I use 0.6mm solder balls (ebay again), I'm a recent convert but these really help.

I apply one or two balls (depending on the size of the beading), you can pick them up with the end of cocktail stick (a drop of moisture helps) and then touch them on the flux on the back of the bead the ball will stay in place there.

 

I don't stick the iron on the ball rather near it and get the solder to flash before moving it around the whole etched bead.

 

I solder on a heat resistant soldering mat which also helps keep things clean.

 

For flux I use Building O Gauge Online water based safety flux.

http://www.7mmlocomotives.co.uk//index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=shop.flypage&product_id=1&category_id=1&manufacturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=52

It's £8 a bottle and my last bottle lasted about 6 years. so just over a pound a year!

I find it works well with most solders and is not as harsh as many other fluxes on the market.

 

To wash off I use Fairy Powerspray/Cillit Bang/Bathroom limescale remover/anything that comes to hand from under the sink.

 

Hope that helps!

 

Angus

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So onward  with the horsebox build.

 

Yesterday was not that productive due to a couple of glass of wine and a large gin all I did was solder in the axle bearings and prep the Mansell wheels.

 

1467228230_horsebox3.jpg.7921bcafabdf557f6d667c4b509f7294.jpg

 

Today was better with the remaining overlays  soldered on the body of the van was put together.

 

Seen here resting on its wheels although these aren't attached. The 5p gives a feel of size.

 

1091642249_horsebox4.jpg.807bcc32283cfea9ac6d4e0bd248d25b.jpg

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A bit more work today,

 

Solbars went on, although they fought back, I really struggled to get them located in the locating slit and get them vertical.

Perseverance paid of in the end (and filing of a lug on on of the solebars....)

 

W irons have been mounted using the Society's jigs that comes with the standard gauge W iron etch to get the spacing right for 9'.

It is a really useful jig.

 

Buffers have been mounted but I'm still not sure, I think they need a longer spindle.1636537161_horsebox5.jpg.d1882a0c5457d4e76fe85cb6b12fde03.jpg

 

The photo shows I've not been as diligent cleaning up as I thought.

I'll attack it more thoroughly tomorrow.

 

Brakes tomorrow!  :O

 

 

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Thanks Tim,

 

They were built in the late 1800s but still in use into the late 1950s.

One of the attractions of Irish railways is how long rolling stock lasted due to insufficient funds for replacements.

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Well, this is a first for me, fully detailed 8 shoe brakes in 2mm.

I found them a faff in 7mm!

The kit is shot down from 4mm so included all the brake parts. 

With the brake shoes installed on one end I built up the brake stretchers and adjusters (I had to remove one of the buffers and trim the locating pin as it interfered with the brake shoe locating slot).

 

751796871_horsebox6.jpg.fa0b6a75b504362e1ea28bd7abc7e6b6.jpg

 

After a couple of attempts I managed to get the whole lot in and the wheels spinning.

I've a suspicion that I should have used deeper W irons, which would explain a few if the issues I've had so far, the brake blocks don't perfectly align with the wheel.

 

1531920914_horsebox7.jpg.e1b665d4779fadea3a9557df7e13686d.jpg

 

So there's the second side to savour tomorrow!

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Easter Hols task completed, well sort of..... I've still got to fit the roof, but I'll do that after painting so I can glaze the Groom's compartment windows.

I also have to fit the Y shaped ventilators on the roof, or more precisely, work out how to build them.

I suspect some thin brass tube will be involved somewhere.

 

It is all built as the kit but with the step and handrail outside the groom's compartment added.

 

1465437275_Horsebox8.jpg.188ab8edb474099a1f3d30f382f9743f.jpg

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31 minutes ago, Argos said:

I also have to fit the Y shaped ventilators on the roof, or more precisely, work out how to build them.

I suspect some thin brass tube will be involved somewhere.

Are they at all similar to the CR two-horn ones as fitted to the Dia.8 horsebox?

 

Jim

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Hi Jim, unfortunately not, the arms of the Y are more elongated and curved.

 

I can't find a picture of the prototype on the web (I've only found three pictures of the real thing) but they can be seen on the kit originator's 4mm version.

 

 

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With the horsebox finished I'm now on with the meat van. Lessons from the horsebox means the van is going to together quite quickly.

 

Progress so far:

 

142880240_Meatvan1.jpg.cfedfc692f0ceaafdb2a33b8a7c130a3.jpg

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The MGWR meat van is now (nearly) finished.

 

1487434229_meatvan3.jpg.fef52746a81ede1c99c41579b6c3c5c6.jpg

 

I've used the Associations new 3D printed combined axle boxes and springs, the LMS versions being a good representation of those used by the MGWR.

They need careful cutting off the print support but are very effective. I did have to drill out the hole in the back a bit to fit over the axle bearing.

 

I said "nearly finished" at the start because something had been bugging em about the van all the way through the build.

I now realise what it is. The planks in the side panels have not been etched. Investigation reveals this is a fault of the etcher as the planks are on the art work. Still too late now!

It's funny how you sometimes miss the blindingly obvious!

 

As I see it I now have four options:-

Ignore the error  (not something I could live with)

Pen in the planks after painting (not sure I could make a good job of that and make it look effective)

Scribe the planks in the brass on the van (that might have worked with the etch in the flat before  I started, but now it's built I think I would be more likely to bend the etched sides)

Adding the planks in 5 thou plasticard is the favourite unless anyone has another suggestion?

 

I've also started on a Worsley works six wheeled GS&WR coach. 

The basic work is done and the cleminson chassis builds up nicely.The supplied roof is too small though (not wide enough), a problem I've also had with some 7mm kits. It's easy enough to make a new one though.

 

1044385298_6wcoachbuild3.jpg.eb381b0a383318b0e2b3aabcad5dd186.jpg

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8 hours ago, Argos said:

unless anyone has another suggestion? 

 

Cut up sticky labels. They're thinner than .005" and thinner I think would look better since you don't want to lift the planks near to height of the raised surrounding.

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I wonder if one solution might be to cut up some sticky labels as richbrummitt suggests but to only place them every alternate plank, having already primed the metal. Then paint the area with a fairly thick paint which is left to dry very thoroughly before pulling the label strips back off (leaving alternate painted/primed-only "planks") and then paint the area again.

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Thanks for the suggestions, I quite like Richbrummet's idea and will give it a go, assuming I can find the address labels we've had hanging around for years that now seem to have disappeared!

 

22 hours ago, Yorkshire Square said:

Was there not a ply version of this van? 

 

Actually that isn't so daft, they were heavily rebuilt in later GSR and CIE days, however the panelling was changed  so I don't think I could get away with that!

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Could you try scoring brass shim and dropping it into the panels? Would be quite thin and you would be able to try this without affecting the wagon. The surface finish would also match. If it looked okay secure in place with cryno.

 

Izzy

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As well as the etched carriage I've now also invested in a 3d print of the charismatic MGWR brake 3rd

641081827_MGWRbrakethirdwhite.jpg.2b1068224d39ce6b317e204873e97637.jpg1162170932_MGWRbrakethirdsides.jpg.390d4652c2df4ba5f62e5d7a7116ab33.jpg

 

After a few hours smoothing I was left with this, with which I am sufficiently happy to carry one building a chassis.

 

887010048_mgwrbrakethirdprimer.jpg.5c57a0f9d852082f152481d7e890b959.jpg

 

 

Taking  a brake from stock building I had a play around with the backscene for the layout today.

The original intention was the layout would be viewed from the rear of the station with the station building, goods shed and signal box all acting as view blockers for the fiddle yard exits.

This works (apologies for the poor photos the sun was coming in the window behind)

690273596_Dromahairbackmock1.jpg.46693db9d8a8a933f30df77b09e5bc99.jpg

 

686902473_Dromahairbackmock2.jpg.5220169e8c7079be749928a99248ac75.jpg

 

This has the disadvantage of not being able to see the wheels of any stock as the platforms prevent this.

Up to now I have been presenting the layout in the more traditional front view.

 

1566247025_Dromahairfrontmock.jpg.21f38196fddb4fd2421f3738af81fe0b.jpg

 

Obviously here there is no view blocker  for the fiddle yard exits from the mainline, there is also a bank in front of the station that might look a bit odd in this view. 

Still not convinced which is better though, any opinions out there?

The mock up of the station building is scaled from various photos, it looks way too tall but I've double checked the measurements, if the is an error it is only a mm or so.

I'll need to draw on the windows and dividing line between the stone lower and rendered upper floor to see if breaking up the surface change the appearance.

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Hi Angus,

 

Personally, I like the view with the track along the front.
 

Will allow to see the gap under the rails as well as all that hard work that has gone in to building the chassis’s.
 

Pete

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