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Get your weathering questions answered

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Afternoon All

 

For a future issue of the magazine, we'd like to help answer your questions on weathering. Let us know your biggest problems/challenges and anything else you're dying to know on weathering, and Steve @ Grimy Times will be offering his advice in an upcoming issue of BRM.

 

Also, any pics of things you're thinking of weathering, or anything you're particularly proud of, post below. 

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Hello BRM,

 

When Weathering Locos and some rolling stock using Enamels some Oil Seepage I noticed tends to soak through the paint after a week or so and even perhaps longer in coaches, this happened in some Hornby Maunsells I did recently for myself and some Dark Patches came up on the roofs end.

 

Besides cleaning the body of a loco (nothing I can do on the coaches) is there a barrier that one can put down to prevent the oil disclouration or should you use arcylics. I prefer enamals as they take longer to dry and are better to work / play around with. 

 

Here are 2 071's I did some time back.

431_3175.jpg.305d4bb0bd24aaa24576e747fc036803.jpg

431_3179_zps8734f55b.jpg.1db45c5d9592d0e9ef1e6c495010d0b4.jpg

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I'd be interested to know Steves method for reproducing faded paintwork on locos and rolling stock. I haven't yet but I'm keen to try the "dot technique"

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A class 03 I recently weathered.

1614419354_allfinished5.jpg.e496892d857e12bc65b11ba1ea05d38d.jpg

 

I love the whole aspect of weathering so I'm looking forward to this. I'd like to know how to deal with wagon roofs, especially a shiny new out of the box van with a perfectly smooth roof. Also weathering without using an airbrush would be a good topic.

Steve.

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Even though many engines in the 60s were absolutely filthy, I've always thought that models which have been 'heavily weathered' just don't look as realistic as more lightly weathered examples. I'm aware of colour scaling effects - do similar rules apply with weathering?

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Posted (edited)

Apart from giving the underframe of wagons and coaches a dusting with dark earth from an aerosol, all my stock is weathered using weathering powders. 

I do not have an airbrush and have no plans to use one. 

 

I find the powders a lot easier to work with than paint. 

 

Rob. 

 

 

20190519_184421.png

20190407_114503-01.jpeg

20181125_151710.jpg.48f4ce3ecaaa9949496c4c04c8611e86.jpg

20190414_143815-01-01-02-01.jpeg

Edited by NHY 581
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On 09/05/2019 at 19:26, sb67 said:

A class 03 I recently weathered.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/1614419354_allfinished5.jpg.e496892d857e12bc65b11ba1ea05d38d.jpg

 

I love the whole aspect of weathering so I'm looking forward to this. I'd like to know how to deal with wagon roofs, especially a shiny new out of the box van with a perfectly smooth roof. Also weathering without using an airbrush would be a good topic.

Steve.

Agree with the observation about running article notes on weathering without an airbrush. 

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I'm on my own learning curve with loco weathering, and the thing I'm finding difficult at the moment is imparting any sort of oily sheen.  I'm after that film of oil and soot that covered the bodywork of even well kept steam locos.  The sooty bit is easy - powders are ok, airbrushed Vallejo washes are great - but the oily patina is eluding me.  Whenever I thin satin (or even gloss) varnishes to the consistency that will go through the airbrush they dry matt!

 

(And given that you're looking for subject matter for BRM please let's avoid that '"end of steam" look, which has been done to death.  I'm not interested in corrosion, neglect, leaking glands, decrepitude or forty miles an hour of roaring rust.)

 

I'm rather of the view that if the first thing you notice about a model is the weathering, it's been overdone.

 

John C.  

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, dpgibbons said:

I'd like some tips on weathering techniques for N Gauge.

Hi,

May I ask you to check out my N gauge layout Shirebrook. Everything is weathered, flickr page link is

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/.

See also  Shirebrook here on RMweb link below.

I am happy to answer any questions arising...

Cheers

Duncan

 

Edited by Duncan.
forgot to include link!

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Thanks Duncan. I was not so much looking for advice as responding to the OP. There is a vast amount of stuff out there on weathering models but almost all of it is aimed at the larger scales, and many techniques don't translate readily to 2mm scale. 

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How to find out which bits of a locomotive or stock are aluminium/ stainless steel /GRP to get the "rust" the correct colour

Baz

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Thinking about the OP, would it be possible to send/post a photo of a prototype and get some advice as to how to replicate it. I find it difficult sometimes to copy weathering from a pic.

Steve.

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