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1 hour ago, Pacific231G said:

I'm probably overthinking this and of course Rule One applies but seeing both here can't help feeling that a serious model of the railways described in Rev. Awdry's books is better without the faces. For me the faces suggest a model of the book illustrations rather than of the "real" NWR. We do of course have the example of Awdry's own models of the railway's locos which were definitely without faces.  I think the first Ffarquhar layout came some time after the first books but I liked the interplay between them with Duck getting its name in the books from the waddling motion of Awdry's Gaiety pannier tank. 

 

 

Live and learn. I thought Duck was from spotters' slang - a duck-six being a 6-coupled engine with no leading carrying wheels - a 0-6-0. All short-wheelbase two-cylinder engines waddle.

 

1 hour ago, Pacific231G said:

Now, has anyone built a serious model of the Merioneth and Llantisilly Rail Traction Company Limited?.Phss..ti..kuff but  I'm not sure about the anatomy of a small heraldic dragon!

 

Llawryglyn at ExpoEM this year - a serious pre-Grouping Cambrian layout look you - did have both Ivor (if a little out-of-gauge) and a small trim welsh heraldic dragon, conveyed (as all livestock should be) in the proper container. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Pacific231G said:

 

Anyway, thanks to both Tom and Knuckles for all this. Now, has anyone built a serious model of the Merioneth and Llantisilly Rail Traction Company Limited?.Phss..ti..kuff but  I'm not sure about the antaomy of a small heraldic dragon!

 

Really sorry for the off-topic post here guys and gals but I couldn't help but think that @awoodford of this parish's model of 'Tweedale' is almost a spiritual successor to the M&LRTC Ltd. :)

 

 

Edited by Corbs
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4 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

Live and learn. I thought Duck was from spotters' slang - a duck-six being a 6-coupled engine with no leading carrying wheels - a 0-6-0. All short-wheelbase two-cylinder engines waddle.

 

It's entirely possible but I wonder if the spotters' slang might have originated from Awdry's "Duck".  In his December 1959 RM "Railway of the Month" article on the original 6ft x 4ft  Ffarquahar Branch he describes it thus

"The above three locos (Thomas, Percy & Toby) normally work the traffic.  The fourth loco, "Duck" is taken along as a spare engine. "Duck" is a Gaiety 0-6-0PT and retains GWR livery, lettering and number. When first bought he waddled- there is no other word to describe his peculiar progress- and our family promptly christened him "Duck"! Now, though re-wheeled and steady, the name still sticks, and has been perpetuated in the books."  

Ffarquhar was designed as an exhibition layout and first appeared in 1956.

WhitehouseFilms of this parish has built a rather nice close reproduction of Ffarquahar mk 1 (Awdry's original having been reversioned as Ffarquahar mk 2)

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/110663-the-ffarquhar-branch/

Edited by Pacific231G
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30 minutes ago, 9793 said:

Speaking of 'Duck'. 5741 is now finished, as is 'Oliver' 1436

 

57XX 'DUCK' 5741

64283703_2261088210650027_7396536125889708032_n.jpg.025c2b09494060ae72b1059beef41feb.jpg

 

64483245_591095961412914_3246283883162894336_n.jpg.78a39ccb205f668d5a78946f0eb346b5.jpg

 

14XX 'OLIVER' 1436

64309278_433682067179612_4302527580902260736_n.jpg.9f3f2a1a248b51b94bc3b7fe51e0698e.jpg

 

64677675_864172893962013_9201714243357900800_n.jpg.7e6b3caf238c11bed3d579efe906d2a8.jpg

 

 

And wonderful they look too. I'm sure the Reverend himself would be following this thread with great interest. 

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14 hours ago, Gibbo675 said:

Hi South Tyne,

 

Here are my versions of Toby and Edward, Toby was scratch built recently using a Dapol Pug chassis and Edward was a converted Triang L1 from about thirty years ago.

 

DSCF0631.JPG.4f956c97cb1b088934bc7324fd9beaf8.JPG

 

DSCF0739.JPG.dbc728817e3e351c8ca5d4dbce1c5664.JPG

 

Gibbo.

 

Cracking stuff Gibbo! I've been dipping in and out of the books all weekend.... all in the name of research obviously! :laugh_mini: Reading about Toby got me hooked on the W&U from an early age and it remains my favourite line to this day. Not only was it fun but the stories also taught me a lot of things about the prototype, as the stories reflected real life events and scenarios on the tramway. 

 

13 hours ago, Pacific231G said:

I'm probably overthinking this and of course Rule One applies but seeing both here can't help feeling that a serious model of the railways described in Rev. Awdry's books is better without the faces. For me the faces suggest a model of the book illustrations rather than of the "real" NWR. We do of course have the example of Awdry's own models of the railway's locos which were definitely without faces. 

 

I would agree on the 'faces' issue; the NWR is certainly a serious subject, with a proper history, that can be reflected through accurate modelling. If desired, a potential option could be removable faces, which can be added for more fun moments, when entertaining kids for example. 

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Looking forward to seeing this one develop - the Rev laid a great foundation of fantasy upon which to build.

 

Used to enjoy the books hugely as a child, although only one story out of all of them has hit the mark with my children, because they are now such 'period pieces'.

 

Kevin

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Previous page please!  And blog 

  I have edited my big post to include Thomas and the now completed Percy, 1 picture of which is here...

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blogs/entry/22353-nwr-6-percy/

 

 

xiUZUCi.png

 

 

 

Lots of pics on previous page.

 

As to faces I like to run engines with faces as well as smokebox doors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Knuckles
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12 minutes ago, Knuckles said:

Previous page please!   I have edited my big post to include Thomas and the now completed Percy, 1 picture of which is here...

xiUZUCi.png

 

 

 

As to faces I like to run engines with faces as well as smokebox doors.

 

And why not. Rule One definitely applies!! 

BTW which DCC channel do you use to change the face's expression ?  :D

(P.S. Very nicely finished model)

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8 hours ago, Nearholmer said:

Looking forward to seeing this one develop - the Rev laid a great foundation of fantasy upon which to build.

 

Used to enjoy the books hugely as a child, although only one story out of all of them has hit the mark with my children, because they are now such 'period pieces'.

 

Kevin

 

Many Thanks Kevin.

I think what attracts me to the Sodor of the Railway Series, is it feels like a very real place. Wilbert's maps are so detailed, it screams out to be modelled. I just wish he was still here to discuss it with.

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On 17/06/2019 at 01:40, south_tyne said:

 

I would agree on the 'faces' issue; the NWR is certainly a serious subject, with a proper history, that can be reflected through accurate modelling. If desired, a potential option could be removable faces, which can be added for more fun moments, when entertaining kids for example. 

You could then have what I've seen on a number of preserved lines where the fibreglass (?) faces used for "Thomas" days can be seen stored in the yard. Having that on a serious scale model of Sodor sounds like an anomaly/reality loop worthy of Douglas Adams (though I don't think any of Awdry's locos carried the number forty two). 

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@Knuckles, @ExplosiveCookie@BritishGypsum4 and myself are regularly enjoying Railway Series discussions of late. One area we have recently been looking into, is the import  of Alumina by ship into Tidmouth, and then onto Peel Gordred (never really shown in the books) seems rather interesting.

From online research, it seems to suggest this would have been done in Covhops or Presflos. Does this sound about right?

Edited by 9793

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Depends on the era I guess? I mimicked the LNER covered hoppers rebuilt from wooden bodied coal wagons when I did my Alumina wagons :)

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34 minutes ago, Corbs said:

Depends on the era I guess? I mimicked the LNER covered hoppers rebuilt from wooden bodied coal wagons when I did my Alumina wagons :)

 

I came across your thread ;)

 

1957-1969 period

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Really interesting thread, I was hooked on the series as a kid, I'm only 30. I was always drawn to the narrow gauge and R&ER personally.

Keep up the good work.

 

Martin

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30 minutes ago, 9793 said:

 

I came across your thread ;)

 

1957-1969 period

There were also some all-steel ones, similar, but not identical, to Covhops.

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2 hours ago, Fat Controller said:

There were also some all-steel ones, similar, but not identical, to Covhops.

 

Thank you.

Looking at modelling circa late 50s to late 60s, is there any information of exactly what was used for transporting Alumina? Would a Covhop be passable?

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Two new projects have arrived this week.

0BBAC679-C3C2-4714-8D88-8D16B10097C5.jpeg.e28704c101b373732f35ee40a8812af6.jpeg

 

I will let others work out the relevance. ;)

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I had a Wilbert but had no real use for it so moved it on. Kind of wish I'd kept it if I'm honest. Lovely model.

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BoCo, now with red buffer beam, as per the illustrations......passes Cwm Prysor Station House on a running in turn! 

 

Renumber and weathering to follow!

Edited by 9793
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Lovely.

I know it’s kind of of topic, but Cwm Prysor’s overgrown siding looks spot on.

I hadn’t realised the background depth of the Thomas the Tank Engine Books before coming across this topic;  given I’m now a dad, I’m more than tempted to collect the whole series!

(sadly I my collection of books suffered from ‘growing up’)

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I am very close to finalising the ordering of baseboards. I possibly posted this earlier, but this is the current track plan I'm going with. Tracks go off at either end to traverser/turntables.

 

674874866_TidmouthCurrentPlan.jpg.dc39fcb97c468bb53a8358b69345142f.jpg

 

The lines to the front of the layout are for the docks traffic, primarily 'The Flying Kipper', with a siding to depicted empties. There should be, in general, enough space for running trains, shunting and holding wagons for later trains.

 

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2 hours ago, 9793 said:

I am very close to finalising the ordering of baseboards. I possibly posted this earlier, but this is the current track plan I'm going with. Tracks go off at either end to traverser/turntables.

 

674874866_TidmouthCurrentPlan.jpg.dc39fcb97c468bb53a8358b69345142f.jpg

 

The lines to the front of the layout are for the docks traffic, primarily 'The Flying Kipper', with a siding to depicted empties. There should be, in general, enough space for running trains, shunting and holding wagons for later trains.

 

Ooh, does that mean you'll have Cranky the crane? Though it's not so in the TV version, I reckon Cranky should be a proper (usually Stothert and Pitt) Toplis level luffing crane. Though almost disappeared now they used to be an incredibly familiar sight in almost any British port and far more authentic than the Airfix "dockside" crane (which resembles nothing I''ve ever seen on a dockside) .

The Toplis level luffing arrangement (patented in 1912 by Claude Toplis an engineer with Stothert and Pitt) meant that the hook stayed level as the jib was raised and lowered. That required very little effort so, unlike most luffing cranes where the jib was raised and lowered by cables, the counterweighted jib  was normally operated by a crank. That enabled them to handle cargo far more quickly and safely. I think it must have been those that inspired Awdry to give his crane the name Cranky.

From old photos it appears that most ships using the small port at Wisbech (the nearest port to his parish) used their own gear to load and unload,  but Awdry would have been very familiar with them from any of the ports in E. Anglia such as King's Lynn.  They could be quite large, like the preserved ones in Bristol,  but smaller examples did exist. Normally (but not always) they ran on rails so they coud get to the ship rather than vice versa  I'll add a couple of images to this when I dig them out. 

 

 

Edited by Pacific231G
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39 minutes ago, Pacific231G said:

Ooh, does that mean you'll have Cranky the crane? Though it's not so in the TV version, I reckon Cranky should be a proper (usually Stothert and Pitt) Toplis level luffing crane. Though almost disappeared now they used to be an incredibly familiar sight in almost any British port and far more authentic than the Airfix "dockside" crane (which resembles nothing I''ve ever seen on a dockside) .

The Toplis level luffing arrangement (patented in 1912 by Claude Toplis an engineer with Stothert and Pitt) meant that the hook stayed level as the jib was raised and lowered. That required very little effort so, unlike most luffing cranes where the jib was raised and lowered by cables, the counterweighted jib  was normally operated by a crank. That enabled them to handle cargo far more quickly and safely. I think it must have been those that inspired Awdry to give his crane the name Cranky.

From old photos it appears that most ships using the small port at Wisbech (the nearest port to his parish) used their own gear to load and unload,  but Awdry would have been very familiar with them from any of the ports in E. Anglia such as King's Lynn.  They could be quite large, like the preserved ones in Bristol,  but smaller examples did exist. Normally (but not always) they ran on rails so they coud get to the ship rather than vice versa  I'll add a couple of images to this when I dig them out. 

 

 

 

I won't be depicting the docks, just the lines that go to them really, and a line for the empties.

 

Cranky who?....... ;)

Edited by 9793
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If you know where to look, you can get a good view of some preserved ones from the DLR, a little way north of Canary Wharf, adjacent to West India Quay station.

Edited by Nearholmer
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