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A bit of water doesn't stop the trains over in Thaliand. Diesel Hydraulics you see - bring back the Class 52's !!

 

 

Brit15

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3 hours ago, APOLLO said:

A bit of water doesn't stop the trains over in Thaliand. Diesel Hydraulics you see - bring back the Class 52's !!

Brit15

I love the way that everyone seems quite happy that there are rails somewhere under there and that none of the structure has been washed away ……………...

Best wishes

Eric 

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6 hours ago, burgundy said:

I love the way that everyone seems quite happy that there are rails somewhere under there and that none of the structure has been washed away ……………...

Best wishes

Eric 

That depends on whether the flood water is flowing significantly or not, probably assisted by local knowledge.

 

Jim

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Anyone know if the line through Corby is open yet?

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On 14/06/2019 at 12:44, burgundy said:

I love the way that everyone seems quite happy that there are rails somewhere under there and that none of the structure has been washed away ……………...

Best wishes

Eric 

 

Indeed. Glanrhyd Bridge, October 1987 ?

 

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Except that there is a difference between circumstances where there is a strong flow across or under the railway, and a widespread area where the track is simply submerged and there are no strong flows, which is why local knowledge enters into the decision making process. (Unless you simplify the process so much that it has no room for any assessment of the situation.)

 

Jim

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Posted (edited)

Glanrhyd was a slightly different situation; the train had not been running over flooded track but under normal conditions (just a rough morning) when it encountered a river bridge that had washed partly away and the driver couldn't stop in time having not seen it in the dark.  The tragic loss of life occurred when passengers re-entered the leading coach, which had already been evacuated by the train crew, to retrieve luggage.

 

I have seen, but can't recall where, a photo of a 56xx running slowly through flood water up to running plate level at Mountain Ash GW, in 1963 I think.  The driver could have had no idea what he was running on, if it was there, or if it was obstructed, and the firebed must have been in the water, and I imagine the passengers had to put their feet on the seats to keep them dry!

Edited by The Johnster

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If you Google "Nottingham railway flood 1947" you will find a number of images of trains running through floodwater.

 

As far as I can tell most of the images are from commercial sites and are therefore for sale, hence I am not linking to them.

 

David

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On 16/06/2019 at 09:36, jim.snowdon said:

Except that there is a difference between circumstances where there is a strong flow across or under the railway, and a widespread area where the track is simply submerged and there are no strong flows, which is why local knowledge enters into the decision making process. (Unless you simplify the process so much that it has no room for any assessment of the situation.)

 

Jim

 

Absolutely Jim, and when Network Rail's track is flooded one of the determining factors regarding train running is whether water is flowing, however given its nature water very often does flow ! As you say local knowledge is therefore vital, but until staff are on site and have assessed the situation no-one can know for sure what state the infrastructure is in.

 

3 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Glanrhyd was a slightly different situation; the train had not been running over flooded track but under normal conditions (just a rough morning) when it encountered a river bridge that had washed partly away and the driver couldn't stop in time having not seen it in the dark.  The tragic loss of life occurred when passengers re-entered the leading coach, which had already been evacuated by the train crew, to retrieve luggage.

 

 

True Johnster, but I was highlighting the very real dangers that exist with water affecting the railway, whether that is high or fast flowing water at a bridge, or simply flooding of the track. And there are other concerns, for example an increased risk of landslips during extreme rain, so much so that after incidents in Scotland an extremely onerous 'Embankments and Cuttings' procedure was introduced to minimise the danger.

 

 

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Wasn't one of the victims at Glanrhyd a bridge inspector, sent specifically to check on the state of the bridges?

I worked on the River Sawdde, which joins the Tywi just south of Llangadog; I've watched it rise five feet or more in an hour.

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The Sawdde comes off the Black Mountain, which is basically a topographical rain making machine; I can easily believe this rate of rise.

54 minutes ago, caradoc said:

 

Absolutely Jim, and when Network Rail's track is flooded one of the determining factors regarding train running is whether water is flowing, however given its nature water very often does flow ! As you say local knowledge is therefore vital, but until staff are on site and have assessed the situation no-one can know for sure what state the infrastructure is in.

 

 

True Johnster, but I was highlighting the very real dangers that exist with water affecting the railway, whether that is high or fast flowing water at a bridge, or simply flooding of the track. And there are other concerns, for example an increased risk of landslips during extreme rain, so much so that after incidents in Scotland an extremely onerous 'Embankments and Cuttings' procedure was introduced to minimise the danger.

 

 

Fair enough, caradoc.

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