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Johnson52

Making a start in hand built track.

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7 hours ago, dogsbody1542 said:

   My intention had originally been to purchase a full turnout kit. However, taking into due consideration various posts which refer to gauges and the set on the stock rail, I have decided that the best option would seem to be to get a kit of chairs and sleepers, code 75 rail and 00-sf gauges. I would then use a templot template to facilitate the build.

   If that goes well I will buy the flextrack and further turnout parts to complete the extension to my layout. All my stock runs out of the box on code 75 as I have checked it on a piece of rail. I just don't want to finish up with  track items which wont allow my stock to traverse them. My point about the cost is valid, so I have to ensure that any items purchased will fit seemlessly into my layout.

 

 

Frank,

 

Not sure if this is your first shot at building your own turnouts, but if it is you might consider experimenting with rail soldered to copper-clad timbers first. Obviously it's not going to look as good as a properly chaired turnout but you might gain a lot of experience in terms of the critical geometry and tolerances without spending a lot of money on chairs.

 

That form of construction is also very robust. When you chuck it across the room in total frustration you won't hurt it too much (don't ask me how I know).

 

I forgot to mention you can easily obtain a template for your turnout from Templot, but you probably knew that already.

 

Cheers,

Andy

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On ‎24‎/‎09‎/‎2019 at 04:26, RedgateModels said:

Think I'm going to cheat (sorry Martin) with the pointwork on RPG (see my Blog here 

) and file a recess in the side of the stock rail to accept the switch blade. I've seen this done on quite a few layouts and it will help with the complex pointwork I have laid out I think.

I have never found it necessary to file the stock rail when using bullhead rail, a joggle is perfectly adequate.  It is however essential and prototypical to grind the rail web when using flat bottom rail.  I use the Fast tracks Stockaid jig which holds the rail firm whilst filing the web.

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10 hours ago, jf2682 said:

I have never found it necessary to file the stock rail when using bullhead rail, a joggle is perfectly adequate.  It is however essential and prototypical to grind the rail web when using flat bottom rail.  I use the Fast tracks Stockaid jig which holds the rail firm whilst filing the web.

 

Thanks for that, it is flat bottomed rail I'm using (Peco code 80 00-9)

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13 hours ago, jf2682 said:

I have never found it necessary to file the stock rail when using bullhead rail, a joggle is perfectly adequate.  It is however essential and prototypical to grind the rail web when using flat bottom rail.  I use the Fast tracks Stockaid jig which holds the rail firm whilst filing the web.

 

If the switch and stock rails are prepared correctly there is no need for a joggle, unless that is the prototype calls for a joggle

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Hi Andy,

              Thanks for your input, and yes I am now going to do precisely that. I am not going to get bogged down in technical details and construct my first turnout to 00 standards and using code100 rail. 

 

Frank.

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5 hours ago, hayfield said:

 

If the switch and stock rails are prepared correctly there is no need for a joggle, unless that is the prototype calls for a joggle

True, but with bullhead rail I think it is usually necessary, and in fact the GWR even had two joggles on the stock rails for sharp switches, a thread on that exists elsewhere.  I don't think I have ever seen a case where a joggle isn't required, it would be nice to see a photo - they must be rare, surely.

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45 minutes ago, jf2682 said:

I don't think I have ever seen a case where a joggle isn't required, it would be nice to see a photo - they must be rare, surely.

 

??? Some confusion there surely?

 

A plain set is much more common than a joggle:

 

stock_rail_rea.jpg

 

It's either a plain set in the diverging stock rail only (undercut switch planing), or a reverse joggle in both stock rails (straight-cut switch planing).

 

The GWR and BR(W) used joggles throughout. Also some other pre-grouping companies such as the GER.

 

Other post-group companies and BR regions used the REA designs, mostly with a plain set, but sometimes with joggles in running-line facing turnouts only.

 

It's very difficult to make an accurate scaled prototypical joggle. A plain set in one side only is much easier to model, and an easy way to make it is:

 

2_041840_270000000.png

 

 

Here's a GWR reverse joggle. Made by putting two bends in the rail close together. Notice how subtle it is and almost invisible in a model:

 

gwr_joggle2.jpg

 

 

Here's an LNER plain set. Made by putting a single bend in the stock rail. This is the most common bullhead design in the UK:

 

switch_set_1983.jpg

Thanks to Mick Nicholson for the pic.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Edited by martin_wynne
images added
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2 hours ago, jf2682 said:

True, but with bullhead rail I think it is usually necessary, and in fact the GWR even had two joggles on the stock rails for sharp switches, a thread on that exists elsewhere.  I don't think I have ever seen a case where a joggle isn't required, it would be nice to see a photo - they must be rare, surely.

 

 

I think it may be the case that we do not notice a plain set, but a joggle in the rails sticks out and is noticed, plus RTR turnouts tend to be designed for functionality rather than for prototypical appearance, with less informed modellers being misled into thinking something which is wrong looking correct  

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2 hours ago, martin_wynne said:

 

??? Some confusion there surely?

 

A plain set is much more common than a joggle:

 

http://www.templot.com/forum_img/stock_rail_rea.jpg

 

It's either a plain set in the diverging stock rail only (undercut switch planing), or a reverse joggle in both stock rails (straight-cut switch planing).

 

The GWR and BR(W) used joggles throughout. Also some other pre-grouping companies such as the GER.

 

Other post-group companies and BR regions used the REA designs, mostly with a plain set, but sometimes with joggles in running-line facing turnouts only.

 

It's very difficult to make an accurate scaled prototypical joggle. A plain set in one side only is much easier to model, and an easy way to make it is:

 

http://85a.co.uk/forum/gallery/2/original/2_041840_270000000.png

 

 

Here's a GWR reverse joggle. Made by putting two bends in the rail close together. Notice how subtle it is and almost invisible in a model:

 

http://www.templot.com/forum_img/gwr_joggle2.jpg

 

 

Here's an LNER plain set. Made by putting a single bend in the stock rail. This is the most common bullhead design in the UK:

 

http://templot.com/forum_img/switch_set_1983.jpg

Thanks to Mick Nicholson for the pic.

 

cheers,

 

Martin.

Thanks for this Martin, evidently I am confusing a set and a joggle!

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I just got an SMP point kit and 10 yards of scaleway track on a certain auction site! Am dead chuffed as it will go a long way to doing my extension.!!

 

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