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Our chrome powder was a vivid yellowy green, but our smelters could & would alloy the basic chrome to suit the customers requirements. Some of the powders used were indeed darker, but as I've said, I kept away from the 'dirty' end of the process. 

 

As for the 38xx, I automatically went for the 2-8-0, I didn't consider the 4-4-0. Ooops!

 

Ian.

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Assuming that the thread title wasn't so cryptic as to leave many that might have participated baffled, then...

On ‎11‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 15:25, Flying Pig said:

... back to the subject, in my not-so-original view The Great Bear is quite likely and Thompson Pacifics an outside possibility, particularly if changes in manufacturing continue to make smaller runs more viable...

...this does seem to be it for the 'something new' possibilities, as far as most participants were concerned.

 

On ‎10‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 18:07, The Johnster said:

The pacific ocean may be almost drained, but the atlantic is barely tapped.  

It's a smaller ocean, their day in the sun being rather brief as six coupled quickly became preferable, in the advance from singles and 4-4-0s. Interestingly they were all pretty much 'dead ends' too, the one attempt at development by the NER not lasting that long. I would hope we might see more, the NBR and NER specimens my favourites, but not hopeful.

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On 14/08/2019 at 22:29, tomparryharry said:

Our chrome powder was a vivid yellowy green, but our smelters could & would alloy the basic chrome to suit the customers requirements. Some of the powders used were indeed darker, but as I've said, I kept away from the 'dirty' end of the process. 

 

As for the 38xx, I automatically went for the 2-8-0, I didn't consider the 4-4-0. Ooops!

 

Ian.

(Puts revolting pedant hat on) There was only ever one GW 38xx class, the Churchward County 4-4-0.  You may be being confused by the 38xx number series being used for batches of 2884 class 2-8-0s...

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2 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

(Puts revolting pedant hat on) There was only ever one GW 38xx class, the Churchward County 4-4-0.  You may be being confused by the 38xx number series being used for batches of 2884 class 2-8-0s...

 

yep, you're entirely right. I overlooked the 2884 class. Put it down to the lack of tea, the weather, lack of modelling opportunities, etc, etc, etc, etc, 

 

Poor old me.... By the way, where did you buy the revolving pedant hat?

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In the revolving and revolting pedant and peasant hat shop of course...

 

Understand about the weather, mate; it's an 'orrible day perfect for modelling and it must be frustrating if you can't do any.  Roll on getting your shed finished, but the weather is probably delaying that as well.

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3 hours ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

 

It's a smaller ocean, their day in the sun being rather brief as six coupled quickly became preferable, in the advance from singles and 4-4-0s. Interestingly they were all pretty much 'dead ends' too, the one attempt at development by the NER not lasting that long. I would hope we might see more, the NBR and NER specimens my favourites, but not hopeful.

 

I quite like the NBR 4-4-2s but I can't really see their being that much demand. Most people who model the NBR would probably prefer the 4-4-0s instead.

 

One thing that could be in their favour is the names. Funnily enough some of them are the same as the Thompson Pacifics.

 

Maybe if Midlothian survived rather than being scrapped "to aid the war effort" there would be sufficient demand.

 

 

 

Jason

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I dunno. Considering the obscurity and/or limited application of many, apparently popular, r-t-r releases over the past 5 years or so, there seems to be some demand for elegant or cute engines in pretty liveries.

 

And how many modellers of a certain age would buy anything NBR on the strength of RM colour features on Craigshire :D?

 

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Would you really say they were cute or elegant though? A bit more like a pitbull than a terrier to my eyes. :lol:

 

800px-Railway_and_locomotive_engineering

 

 

 

Jason

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Well, I think that's a perfectly fine looking engine!

I'd certainly love to see it available as a model BUT (there's always a but!) how about matching rolling stock? While I'd be happy putting a plastic kit together, I've never tackled an etched brass coach kit and then there's the problem of trying to get a decent enough finish to match the loco.

Herein lies the continuing problem for the British modeller - critical mass!

 

Let's think about this another way: If such a loco were to be produced in say, LNER livery - are there sufficient LNER liveried coaches available for it to haul, even if the coaches are a bit "modern" for such a loco?

I think most modellers would be happy with that compromise, rather than insisting on era appropriate (NBR) coaches.

Cheers,

John.

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Hi Folks,

 

This is probably the most successfully long lived of all of the classic British Atlantic designs:

 

3370.jpeg

 

Gibbo.

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