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Michael Edge

Michael Edge's workbench

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Is that an LNER Iron Ore Hopper next to the palvan, Mike?

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I don't know what the origin of that is, came in a job lot of wagons for Carlisle. At the moment it's just used a test vehicle, as is the K's Palvan which is a DG coupling test vehicle (not much use for anything else, it's far too heavy and stiff running to put in a train).

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Fair enough, Mike. It piqued my curiousity since i've been doing some research into Iron Ore hoppers recently.

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7 hours ago, Daniel W said:

Is that an LNER Iron Ore Hopper next to the palvan, Mike?


looks like the old Jidenco kit of the 25t LNER or hopper 

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11 minutes ago, Down_Under said:


looks like the old Jidenco kit of the 25t LNER or hopper 

Thanks for the info. I wasn't aware that Jidenco did a kit for one of those.

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Posted (edited)

It is a Jidenco kit.. I have two from the same batch. The solebars are in the wrong place and my two may be nearly at the too of roundtuit work

Baz

Edited by Barry O

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anyone remember the "Super" 40 Mike has built for Carlisle as seen earlier on the thread?

 

Well it has a soundchip (Legomabiffo Loksound V5) and has been weathered. "not too dirty" was the weathering details. As it happens in Michael Welches book on "Diesels on the London Midland" I found a photo of a close relative .. D335. So ..

 

722375388_Super403qtrfrontotherside.JPG.85e671414bdb209f8f273919b622ec1c.JPG

 

On close inspection of the photo in the book someone had cleaned the yellow panel..a tiny bit of cleaned dirt needs to be applied to the panels away from the central door...

688583171_Super4sideon.JPG.9d72f21bcf531beba8952bba49ccce66.JPG

 

It is very heavy!.. Crushed my usual weathering loco holder flat...

 

Baz

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On 20/06/2020 at 23:28, Down_Under said:


looks like the old Jidenco kit of the 25t LNER or hopper 


Yes, I think I've said before James that these go together easily enough but sadly they're not an accurate representation of the prototype. I've got two built as intended and one which has had lots of changes to bring it closer to the prototype, with limited success it has to be said. 

 

Paul A. 

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Interesting that you are using an N20 motor on a medium sized locomotive. I'm currently making up a Comet chassis for a Jinty but I chickened out and used a Mashima  in a HL gearbox because I thought a 1:60 N20 would have been too small.

I'd be interested to know how this installation works out, please.

Cheers

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I've got one of these running in a 7mm Hunslet 05, with a fair bit of weight in it and it can still easily spin the wheels. More than enough power for a Crab, it's the very low ratio gearbox     (I've not used anything else although others are available), maximum speed looks about right on the layout but I haven't timed it. The first one I used has been running (with 1:1 skew gears) in a Hunslet 14" on Herculaneum Dock for some years now without any problems. I've got a big bag full of them, might see them in all sorts of locos yet.

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Question, these are powerful motors for their size (having some myself to play with), but how much of the extra power you have at the rails are from the motor and how much from not using worm drive? I think the better performance my be coming from the use of the bevel gears instead.

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That's a good question, worm gears aren't very efficient but the skew gears I used in the Hunslet 14" are just as good. The spur drive box takes the output shaft down to a maximum speed that is OK for most locos (varies with wheel diameter of course) - all it needs is a 1:1 final drive. The bevel gears are a bit quieter than the skew gears though so might be a bit more efficient. However I only have one set of the skew gears left and I don't know where they came from to get any more. I find the power output amazing and they don't take much current either.

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As you're in the industry, has there been any discussion with someone like High-Level about producing a bevel set for the N20 at a commercial level?   I'd imagine it would be a bit more expensive than the bag-o-gears that need cutting and boring to work right, but cheaper than the 3D prints.

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That's more or less what I have used - bevel/helical gear is a spectacular piece of nonsense - helical = skew gears as I have already described, bevel is what you see there.the crown wheels lower down are much more interesting though, I've been trying to find a source of these, slightly less efficient than bevels but much more forgiving to mesh. 

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The last of these workbench photos provoked a bit of interest so here's an update as of this morning. Three pictures this time, shows just about everything this time.

IMG_0947.JPG.c094171e81cb55a7fce221fe98788d98.JPG

The 06 is just overspill from the kit display model boxes, parked here, not being worked on. The two 00 wagons are for DG coupling testing, on the left just visible is the spring and scale used as a crude dynamometer rig. The stop blocks (nails) are good for provoking panic in visitors. Note the ancient Triang resistance controller and ammeter - the cut out is disabled on this so I can whack full current out which is excellent for detecting short circuits (nice big visible sparks). There is a proper controller as well...

IMG_0948.JPG.7f6a7e22e2f3fbf2a714955c42d71d0b.JPG

the DIN plug in the centre is for a proper modern controller, at the left switches connect the power to various parts of the test track - varying from O gauge to a section of Hornby Dublo three rail at the back, this more for the sake of nostalgia than any practical use.

In the foreground things have moved on a bit, two locos ready for delivery - next job underway is at the right, TT this time, after that it will be back to the P4 Kirtley 0-4-4T. the Stanier 3P has had its chimney temporarily removed to make a new mould and the LSW C14 is still here.

IMG_0949.JPG.cefaa3158e536332e7e473c45079c009.JPG

From the far end, Triang TT track nearest with a couple of test wagon underframes. The Kitmaster 08 has been parked here for many years, I think it was part of some kit development work at one time, the 4F frame is a very poor runner and will probably be stripped for its Portescap motor eventually.

Coupling height gauges live here, the steel block is for DGs and the other is a Kadee mounted at 4mm scale UK height.

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They are far too clean!  (but very nice!)

 

Baz

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8 hours ago, Barry O said:

They are far too clean!  (but very nice!)

 

Baz

Sorry but I don't think you'll get to weather these two!

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5 hours ago, Anadin Dogwalker said:

Hope I didn't imagine it, but what's happening with the single arm Faiveley pantograph please?

Neill Horton

No, you're not imagining it, first trials went very well but I'm waiting for a second test etch to make sure before it goes into production.

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Just arrived from PPD, this test etch for an idea I had some time ago.

1591208824_DGcombinedhooks.JPG.9f226da6f074c6d61af1cb26f414fef8.JPG

These are combination draw hooks and DG coupling pegs, etched in .015" n/s.

1992599994_DGcombinedhookMDHBHudswell.JPG.3b3ac45d93673ba81602a77f09d7d801.JPG

This is the sort of job which prompted the idea, DG couplings are very difficult to fit to deep buffer beams but there is always a drawhook slot at consistent height. The separate L shaped etch forms the latch, pivoted on a pin - this is a bit more like a Dingham latch than a DG one but it works well so far. Without the latch the coupling is fairly unobtrusive - even more so painted black - and it's still a conventional drawhook (there's a hole in it as well for a 3 link or screw coupling).

I thought at first that it would mean propelling with the buffers (not good in 00 gauge) but it turns out that it pushes against the DG buffer on the vehicle it is coupled to.

227096842_DGcombinedhookC14.JPG.6ca62ec7d313e9cbe4acd47a68fc8b50.JPG

I've also fitted them to the C14 4-4-2T, they work well on the test track, I've not tried them on the layout yet. We have a good number of locos without leading couplings on the grounds that they are rather unsightly and rarely used - but sometimes essential, e.g. the Wentworth Junction bankers have to have one - I think these will be a much better option.

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