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Replacing wheel in the older Tri-ang rolling stock.

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How I Replace wheels on older Triang wagons.

This is my first post using photos so I hope it works

I used Evergreen 3/32 “ tube for this replacement as it contrasts better with the frame, 3/32 brass can be used and this will give brass bearings. Why 3/32 because it fits neatly into the bogie axle hole. Cut the strips longer than needed soo that you have something to grip and adjust the wheel set.

Ensure that one end of the tube is square and debur it (this end goes against wheel axle) photo 1

Put one side in and position flush with the inside of the wheel set. photo 2

Put wheel in by sliding into empty axle box and then sliding it over so that the tapered end of the axle is located in the hole of the tube.

Push the other side in and centre the wheel set. photo 3

Make sure that the wheel set is centred and that it rotate freely. photo 4

Apply superglue to outside of tube. photo 5

Repeat for other wheels.

When the superglue has set, cut off the surplus plastic and paint black. photo 6

Finding the correct size wheel is more of a problem for me.

 

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I've replaced the original steamroller plastic wheels on some 1960s vintage 'shortie' clerestories, and was surprised to find that current 14mm Bachmann coach wheels were a drop in replacement in the original bogies (which have been worked up a bit to look a bit more like Dean 8'6" with footboards and the tie bar cut out); running is as good as a modern vehicle and buffer height is correct.  You might be in trouble with very old Rovex/Triang which had open axleboxes that you could see the end of the axle through, but anything from about 1960 on should be ok.

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It must be rather later than 1960 as the coaches didn't appear till 1962 (IIRC) and the first ones still had open end axleboxes. I would have thought that fitting 14mm wheels would have lifted the buffer height even further (Tri-ang wheels are about ½" diameter). Did you make some modification to the bolster?  Bachmann wheels are 25.4mm over pin-points (the NMRA standard) whereas the Tri-ang/Hornby axle is around 26mm (They tend to vary I find), so there could be a mis-match in the bearings?

 

Back in the day I converted some bogies as described, complete with footboards*. The footboards go a long way to hiding the modification, but they were removed in later days I found, so mine run on K's bogies (now 'heritage' like the coaches) (I know Hornby have reintroduced them but they are no longer the bargain (9/6d) that they were when they first appeared).

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Wheels sourced were 10.5mm in diameter and the axle length was 26mm.  Axle length is irrelevant as the tubing can be moved either in or out to accommodate any length.  The bogies are the old metal type  with open axle boxes , this is why you can push the tubing in from the outside of the axle boxes.  The wheels were sourced from a supplier who also supplied american parts so they may be american profile, but they were the same size as the original plastic wheels. 

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That looks really good

 

Peco used to make pin point bearings which you could insert from the outside and then bend over a securing tab on the inside to convert these wagons to pin point bearings.

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My shorties have new brass buffers for which I drilled out the original holes and I can't remember if I lowered the centres to get the buffers to the right height, but they match current RTR stock and I assume they are correct.  The bogies will eventually be replaced with Stafford Road/Shapeways printed ones.  Photos of the last clerestories in service on the WR, used on Cwmmer-North Rhondda miner's workman's trains, show the bogies still carrying footboards, and mine are used on a similar but fictional working.  The footboards are real wood from real trees, actually Sainsbury's cafe coffee stirrers cut in half lengthways and to length.  Rebates are cut out for the axleboxes and they are simply superglued in place; they'll 'do' until replaced.   I've decided to live with the incorrect length and crude underframe.

 

The coaches have been generally worked up, with interiors, new buffers, clerestory glazing, a repaint and new wheels as well as the work on the bogies.  They are still in the range, no longer 9/6d and still with the B1 bogies, stuck to the bottom underframe detail, and empty interior,  The price is what you'd expect in the modern market but seems excessive for such a crude and well redacted model.  The panelling is still as good as anything ever produced RTR though, and they can be worked up into something reasonable.  

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The last clerestory I saw for for sale (in Modelzone! I now live in a model shop desert...)  was twenty odd quid and had a silly face on the end. It is possible that only the footboards between the bogies were removed, but it wouldn't have been a high priority so late survivors were quite likely. Mine were made of card and removed themselves! I fitted K's brass coach buffers filed to an elliptical shape (their oval buffers were a strange shape). They now have white metal ones. They've been in store for several years and a considerable amount of maintenance/finishing is required.

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OP, thank you for this wonderfully simple idea! I have several old items of rolling stock to which it will be applied once I have got the right diameter tubing, including a half done conversion for use on 7mm narrow gauge.

The narrow gauge conversion was  a Triang bogie well wagon  which I previously rewheeled by putting new wheels on the old axles, but although it rolled well on plain track, it was prone to derailing on points due the amount of lateral movement between axle and frame.  Your tubing idea will make this adjustment much simpler.

And I am still thinking 'why didn't I think of that!'.

 

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