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St. Simon

Collingwood - A Privatisation Era Southern Region Layout

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16 minutes ago, Siberian Snooper said:

One of the other 3rd rail modellers on here built a substation, but I can't remember which one.

 

 

West Sands by GEEP 7.  Try page 20 for a first look, but plenty of discussions earlier. 

Paul.

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44 minutes ago, Siberian Snooper said:

One of the other 3rd rail modellers on here built a substation, but I can't remember which one.

 

 

 

27 minutes ago, 5BarVT said:

West Sands by GEEP 7.  Try page 20 for a first look, but plenty of discussions earlier. 

Paul.

 

Hi,

 

Yes, I have seen that and it looks fantastic, although having looked at the one at Fareham, it looks very much like the Bachmann Scenecraft version:

 

2020800430_FarehamSubStatiuon.JPG.d7bfdeed68e21af74806cde7178d17d2.JPG

 

So I might go with modifying one or two of those structures.

 

Regards,

 

Simon

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Simon

Buy yourself an Anycubic Photon or similar 3D printer and print your own point motors etc. You can get them sub £200 now. The quality of the prints is almost as good as a shapeways product. I have one and over the summer have for my son and various club members printed in 4 mm scale 200 various types of loco lamps. 150 milk churns, Numerous fence posts, Ships propellors, 20 40ft waste containers, all done with £37 of resin.  Currently with a new bottle of resin I am printing 50 GWR battery boxes and getting ready to print a couple of GWR Manor boilers.  Photo  below is of a boiler for my LNWR shunting engine. These cost about £50 each from shapeways. So 4 of them covers the cost of the printer!

IMG_1332.JPG.c59fb2f65941e313b80aac7c0bde63a5.JPG

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On 12/09/2020 at 23:16, kipford said:

Simon

Buy yourself an Anycubic Photon or similar 3D printer and print your own point motors etc. You can get them sub £200 now. The quality of the prints is almost as good as a shapeways product. I have one and over the summer have for my son and various club members printed in 4 mm scale 200 various types of loco lamps. 150 milk churns, Numerous fence posts, Ships propellors, 20 40ft waste containers, all done with £37 of resin.  Currently with a new bottle of resin I am printing 50 GWR battery boxes and getting ready to print a couple of GWR Manor boilers.  Photo  below is of a boiler for my LNWR shunting engine. These cost about £50 each from shapeways. So 4 of them covers the cost of the printer!

IMG_1332.JPG.c59fb2f65941e313b80aac7c0bde63a5.JPG


Hi,

 

That was my intention initially, in fact I almost got to the point of paying for it, but I realised that I don’t have a suitable location in the flat to operate it safely, so I haven’t yet.

 

I’ve got a couple of quotes from companies, so I’m weighing up the options.

 

Simon

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Hi,

 

Over the last week or so, I've been trying to build Collingwood's Station Builidngs, however, I remembered why I much prefer kit building, I simply can't cut bare plastic straight or square! Last night I used a template from Scale Model Scenery, along with a square and a steel rule, to cut out the first two windows from the first wall, but they ended up not straight, not square, and nowhere near the size they should be.

 

So, I'm going to have to try a different approach. Ideally a kit which is close enough to the below so that I can build / modify it would be great:

 

Fareham_Station.PNG.78d788f33002470baa064ca7f9097302.PNG

 

Fareham_Station_2.PNG.050bc49ced9871a9260a0ed8e4f7f12c.PNG

 

However, I can't find anything like it from any manufacturers. I don't need all of it, just the main grey building and the first couple of brick buildings would do, however, the only kits for a single story building are all Great Western, Stone. or Wood Cladding. I don't mind if it is plastic or laser cut, just something close would do.

 

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated!

 

In better news, the first signals, CD810, CD812 and CD814 have been ordered from Absolute Aspects, but I'm expecting these around Christmas as Matt has quite a work load on! I've also, as mentioned above, got some quotes for 3D Printing all the Lineside details I need, so hopefully that will be here fairly soon! Finally, I have constructed the Cable troughing from Scale Model Scenery, as well as Catch Pits. So far I have installed the Catch Pits, but I'm going to go and get some spray paint today to paint the cable troughing a suitable concrete colour and then install that.

 

Simon

 

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Plenty of people running Photons et al next to an open window!

 

I'd personally get something from the Elegoo Mars family (I have both); either the bog standard Mars @ £190 or the new Mars 2 Pro at £275.


Happy to run off a few prints for you if that would help; certainly be cheaper than Shapeways!

 

 

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This is just to say you're building my dream layout here - 3rd rail with fully prototypical signalling…!

 

I'm actually devastated that you've had so much success with JMRI as you expertly documented in the other thread. It confounds me, so I was convinced I'd need to write my own system running on a Raspberry Pi and a network of Arduinos (or Atmel microcontrollers with Arduino firmware) to achieve a layout with working signalling controlled by a route-setting panel. But now I know JMRI is definitely a viable option :D

Edited by BusDriverMan

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3 hours ago, BusDriverMan said:

This is just to say you're building my dream layout here - 3rd rail with fully prototypical signalling…!

 

I'm actually devastated that you've had so much success with JMRI as you expertly documented in the other thread. It confounds me, so I was convinced I'd need to write my own system running on a Raspberry Pi and a network of Arduinos (or Atmel microcontrollers with Arduino firmware) to achieve a layout with working signalling controlled by a route-setting panel. But now I know JMRI is definitely a viable option :D

 

Hi,

 

Thank you, nice to hear I'm not the only one who is interested in the subject!

 

I wouldn't say that what I'm doing is 'fully prototypical', for reasons that I explained in the IECC thread, but I think it is the practically the closest thing you can achieve realistically without buying an actual interlocking. You don't have to write your owns software, as long off the shelf software can take physical inputs, perform [or] and [and] logic on them and then switch physical outputs (which JMRI can do), you can make it operate like an interlocking,

 

However, there are a few things I have learnt from doing all the signalling which I can pass on to anyone hoping to replicate prototypical signalling as there's a difference between a prototypically signalled layout and a layout with a prototypical signalling system and making the former into the latter is not as easy as you think!

  1. You can't just build an NX panel (or any route setting panel) that simulates the operation of an NX Panel you've got to build a panel that replicates the operation of an NX Panel - There is some really quite complex logic behind the operation of the an NX Panel, and, whilst it may see overkill for a model railway, if you don't replicate that logic, you will find that your panel won't always work like the prototype, particularly when you don't always do things in the order that is intended.
  2. You can't just build the NX Panel and stop there, you need to build the interlocking behind it as well - Again, seems overkill, but it is the best way to ensure the prototypical operation of the signalling system, and prevent damage to stock though preventing collisions (just like the real thing). I've been lucky in that I have access to the typical circuits for a route relay interlocking, and this is where most people will fall down, typical interlocking circuits are not publically available, and certainly shouldn't be.
  3. Don't try and build a physical interlocking (i.e. out of actual relays) - It simply is not practical unless you are a real railway, after all, there is a reason that we build large interlocking rooms and spend lots of money when we build signalling systems in real-life. Use a computer (or micro-processor), to carry out your interlocking logic
  4. Don't try and build a physical panel unless it is for a very simple layout or you have a decent amount of space - The NX Panel for Collingwood was going to be over a metre long, anything small and it would have been far too difficult to build.
  5. Don't apply the signalling system to the whole layout - In theory, there is no reason as to why the signalling can't be used on the whole layout, but using it for none-scenic areas, such as a fiddle yard, isn't really needed, and just makes it more complex and expensive.

Simon

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Hi Simon,

Agree with all of that from both a modelling and professional viewpoint.

You’ve been taught well by those folk in Reading . . . 

:-)

Paul.

 

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I've thought about making an experimental miniaturised NX panel, either standalone (with probably Arduino-based interlocking, TD berth control, and train simulation) or interfaced with SimSig. Probably using pushbuttons and a "CANCEL" Shift key rather than push-pull switches because cost / availability. I'm thinking of a design based on ~25mm square tiles, probably cosmetic rather than actually modular, using 64x32 OLED screens for berths and possibly addressable RGB LED strips for the route lights.

 

Gratified the relevant Railway Group Guidance Note gives provision to have the first route light to flash white instead of strictly requiring the routesetting switch to flash!

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19 minutes ago, BusDriverMan said:

Gratified the relevant Railway Group Guidance Note gives provision to have the first route light to flash white instead of strictly requiring the routesetting switch to flash!

 

Yes, the key is in the title: Guidance ;) I've changed a few symbols on my panel from the standards to make it look nicer!

 

In terms of route lights flashing, I know that at Western Panels flash the first route light as a reminder for the signalling to cancel the route.

 

Simon

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