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Pictures of quaint small goods yards in the 70s-90s


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21 hours ago, Regularity said:

 

It’s not very small, not particularly quaint and not a goods yard, but it is 70s and 80s.

 

All true but you have to give points for the sheep on the platform.

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41 minutes ago, Regularity said:

It’s a big building behind the station. Regardless of its use/purpose, it’s not a small, quaint goods yard but a big building behind the station, the station and the DMU stabling being the core focus of the picture. As a fan of the Rhymney Railway, and someone who grew up in the 70s, I really like and appreciate the picture, but the reason I subscribe to this thread is explained in its subject title - plenty of other threads for DMUs, large yards, etc elsewhere on the forum, and if not, they could be created.

 

Right, so a goods yard with two sidings isn't small then? So only stations with a single siding should be posted from now on? I get that a lot of the pictures don't focus on the goods yard, but that's because I couldn't any that do, plus the station in general is quite interesting IMO so that's why I posted the others.

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25 minutes ago, montyburns56 said:

 

Right, so a goods yard with two sidings isn't small then? So only stations with a single siding should be posted from now on? I get that a lot of the pictures don't focus on the goods yard, but that's because I couldn't any that do, plus the station in general is quite interesting IMO so that's why I posted the others.

I've really enjoyed this thread in all its forms - can we just crack on?

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3 hours ago, montyburns56 said:

 

Right, so a goods yard with two sidings isn't small then? So only stations with a single siding should be posted from now on? I get that a lot of the pictures don't focus on the goods yard, but that's because I couldn't any that do, plus the station in general is quite interesting IMO so that's why I posted the others.

Number of sidings <> size of yard.

 

And if you read what I wrote, rather than feeling that you have been picked on, I actively stated my appreciation for the photo you posted, but it is isn’t by any stretch of the imagination small or quaint, and the photo is mostly not goods yard.

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This might get criticised for not being Miss Marpleshire enough too, but since it is one of the few traditional goods yards that I can clearly remember being in active use, and because I think it has great potential as a model, with good ‘view blocks’ at either end of the scene, I commend it to the collective https://www.kentrail.org.uk/tunbridge_wells_central_goods.htm (you need to cog through the several pages).

 

Does anyone know of photos on line of Sunningdale goods yard, that being one that I recall very clearly from the early 60s (I think it was gone by the 70s)?

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36 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

Does anyone know of photos on line of Sunningdale goods yard, that being one that I recall very clearly from the early 60s (I think it was gone by the 70s)?

 

I recall the site well enough as when commuting home to Reading in the late 90s I used once a week hop off the train there, getting back on the next train with most of the week's shopping from the Waitrose that was then (is now?) there. If that's not a pick-up goods manoeuvre I don't know what is. 

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The goods yard was on the down side, where the car park and the corner of Waitrose now are. When I was a boy, we used to go there by bus from my grandparents’ home, then walk up to Virginia Water to have a picnic. The goods yard was right where the bus stopped, and the air of busy, organised chaos, with heaps of coal, wagons etc always fascinated me.

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14 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

The goods yard was on the down side, where the car park and the corner of Waitrose now are. When I was a boy, we used to go there by bus from my grandparents’ home, then walk up to Virginia Water to have a picnic. The goods yard was right where the bus stopped, and the air of busy, organised chaos, with heaps of coal, wagons etc always fascinated me.

 

The 1898 OS 25" map shows an end loading dock, a loading bank/goods shed siding, and a mileage siding. It also shows a small gasometer.

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It was a busy little yard. We used to pick up hen food from West Cumberland Farmers; when we went there first in 1983, there were vans of beet nuts next to the old goods shed (rented to WCF), and a number of wagons at the coal yard, which was at the western edge of the site, across the station forecourt. There had previously been two Government 'Intervention' stores; a brick built one west of the station, and the hutments visible in some of the photos, between the railway and the Tyne. The area between the huts and the railway was a ballast stockpile, opened in the late 1980s, and replacing Belford.

There had also been a small oil terminal (WCF again) and a cement terminal in the main yard; these closed in the 1970s.

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Hexham had a nice crane, unfortunately no longer operable when photographed https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/hexhamcrane

 

As mentioned the Ciba Geigy tanks worked there, including some unique prototypes https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/cibageigyaraldite

 

And timber to Caperboard (Where the Ciba Geigy resin glue went as well) https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/ota/e35ee3a50

 

 

Edited by hmrspaul
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19 hours ago, Fat Controller said:

It was a busy little yard. We used to pick up hen food from West Cumberland Farmers; when we went there first in 1983, there were vans of beet nuts next to the old goods shed (rented to WCF), and a number of wagons at the coal yard, which was at the western edge of the site, across the station forecourt. There had previously been two Government 'Intervention' stores; a brick built one west of the station, and the hutments visible in some of the photos, between the railway and the Tyne. The area between the huts and the railway was a ballast stockpile, opened in the late 1980s, and replacing Belford.

There had also been a small oil terminal (WCF again) and a cement terminal in the main yard; these closed in the 1970s.

 

Sorry to turn up a little late to this comment, but do you know if the W.W. II Cold Store retained sidings about it, please?  I took some photographs of Loughborough's - converted to use as an R.S.G. - that did so (but was cut off from the main line).  I always wanted to visit Hexham's, but missed it before demolition.  I also wanted to model one of these, but calculated (erroneously?) I would need a three-foot length of base-board to accomodate it!  Playing now with brick sheeting for viaducts, I am glad I never took this project on...

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2 minutes ago, C126 said:

 

Sorry to turn up a little late to this comment, but do you know if the W.W. II Cold Store retained sidings about it, please?  I took some photographs of Loughborough's - converted to use as an R.S.G. - that did so (but was cut off from the main line).  I always wanted to visit Hexham's, but missed it before demolition.  I also wanted to model one of these, but calculated (erroneously?) I would need a three-foot length of base-board to accomodate it!  Playing now with brick sheeting for viaducts, I am glad I never took this project on...

The sidings had gone by the time we moved to the area in 1982. Like Loughborough, it was adapted to an RSG, with a lot of radio antennae on the roof. I wonder how many of these structures were built? I remember one at Banbury, probably now demolished, whilst the one at Paddock Wood (west of the road bridge) was still connected to the Down main in the 1990s, and was used as a car auction. 

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1 hour ago, Fat Controller said:

I wonder how many of these structures were built?

 

In an idle moment, I tried to work that out, and gave up. The answer seems to be "a heck of a lot", if one counts in the various classes/types of food stores,"cold", "buffer" etc. 

 

As instances, there was a huge one, I think a grain store, north of Oxford, a cold store just north of Northampton, a mysterious store that I guess was probably for dry goods a field away from Tring station, a large herd of Nissen huts at Qauinton Road, and thats just a few that I happened to see fairly often. To my recollection, they werent a feature of the SE of England, although pillboxes, dragon's teeth etc were, so I guess the WW2 ones were kept behind the assumed area of invasion.

 

They seem to have remained in use for a surprisingly long time, and I think extra ones might have been built during The Cold War, so sidings must have been retained, and stocks must have been periodically rotated. One of these would make an ideal source of traffic on a 1950s-themed layout, and a cold store could probably be represented fairly plausibly using a US kit from Walthers, as can dairy buildings from the 1930s to 1950s.

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On 03/08/2021 at 19:01, montyburns56 said:

It seems like this would be quite a nice station to model if you like freight and DMUs. It reminds me a bit of a Welsh version of Aylesbury.

 

Rhymney Station 1972 by KDH Archive

 

72 063 310372 Rhymney Station

 

1975 by Andy Kirkham

 

Rhymney Station, January 1975

 

By Jonathan Hazan

 

Rhymney

 

1985 by Brian Tucker

 

Rhymney Station 7/7/85 Bob Ranson Collection

 

1977 By old hat1 

 

2013-05-31_9.JPG rhymney station, april 1977

 

Comparing pix 1 and 2, although in the second a number of tracks have been lifted, including what I assume would have been 'platform 2' on the island, , a siding seems to have been re-instated on the outside of the island platform. Any ideas why? Did the track rationalisers just get carried away? 

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Sorry to drag this so off-topic, but it is rather an interest of mine, being a child of the Cold War.  There was a list I saw a few years ago on the www composed by someone, and the structures are mentioned in 'Cold war : building for nuclear confrontation 1946-1989', Barnwell, P. S. (ed.), Swindon : English Heritage, 2003, (rev. pbk. 2004).  Peasmarsh (Surrey) is illustrated, but sadly there are no plans.  Do see pp.215-; I will transcribe it if there is interest and when I have more time.  Five types: Cold Store, Grain silos, fuel stores, general purpose depots, and misc. stores.  The penultimate were single storey sheds used later for intervention stores (e.g., E.E.C. sugar and butter mountains).  47 cold stores built, 2x million cu.ft., 5x half-million cu.ft., 40x quarter-million cu.ft. designs.

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