Jump to content

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, brylonscamel said:

 

I agree - it's not that difficult and you learn so much more along the way!

This little distillery has me digging through books and looking at info online - I've learned about whisky making, the history of distilleries in Scotland and feel like I can start to read the architecture; the styles, different types of stone and  architectural details. I had no idea that one architect in Elgin had such an influence on the  development of the style of distilleries or that whisky making has been though so many ups-and-downs.

You get to chat to fellow modellers in more depth and they are great for informing what you are doing - plus I also had a great chat with my Dad about it last night - so it has been really valuable.

 

I find the research about specific buildings necessary to make them and concerning their history, development and style is an extra enjoyable dimension to the hobby. And you learn so much about the locality.

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have to say that the signal boxes and the distillery buildings look very impressive.

 

Colin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ‘angel’s share’ is a term used to describe product unavoidably lost in the manufacturing, storage, or distribution processes.  For whisky it is evaporation, for coal the dust blown off wagons in transit.  

 

Either way, it has vanished irretrievably into the air never to return, presumably to float heavenwards for the angels to use.  With coal, where the loaded wagons are weighed accurately on a weighbridge so that the customer is fairly charged for the amount he receives, an ‘angel’s share’  mustbe taken into account as the customer always receives a little less than the amount stated on the weighbrige waybill. 

 

There is clearly an opportunity for pilferage here, in the same way as ‘damages’ in warehousing and handling. 

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is one of those updates where you think "will anyone even notice the changes"? Work has picked up lately and I haven't had much time for the important stuff, like dog walks, cycling, chatting in cafes and MODEL MAKING!

There's actually been a fair bit of work with clay and styrene to get to this point, despite almost imperceptible changes.

Anyway, all the basic connected buildings in the distillery are now made.



 

braeside-distillery-12.jpg

braeside-distillery-12a.jpg

Edited by brylonscamel
  • Like 12
  • Craftsmanship/clever 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I kept a bit of clay-on-card aside to try out scribing  & colouring combinations before I start on the actual distillery buildings.

The distilleries I have been eyeing up are the Aberdeenshire ones which are largely in rough / dressed granite. I rather like the ones that contain granite in a pink hue amongst the greys.

I have a couple of books on distilleries and found photos of buildings at Aberlour distillery which were the sort of thing I was looking to emulate ..

 

braeside-distillery-13c.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, ianblenk said:

Loving the distillery. here's one I did a few years back based on Towiemoor

 

 

Cheers Ian - I had discovered your distillery model whilst searching threads here for other models. I loved your rendition; there are lots of nice details like the coal hatch doors, loading bays, decorative quoins, hoists etc. The whole thing has a nice atmosphere about it - definitely one I had in the 'inspirational' category.

 

PS I had a look online and there really isn't much left of Towiemore distillery these days, just a few buildings put to use on the farm!

Edited by brylonscamel
  • Agree 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Scott took bottles of Towiemoor on his ill fated expedition to the South Pole.

Great to see a full relief model of a distillery. I did ask Elgin Library if they had copies of Charles Doigs drawing, which they do, however they wanted in excess of £200 to copy them. I politely declined!

 

Looking forward to more posts, I also love Caledonian Basin

 

Ian B

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ianblenk said:

Loving the distillery. here's one I did a few years back based on Towiemoor; https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/68909-bridge-of-alford/&tab=comments#comment-966143

 

I had the pleasure of seeing this layout which was being shown by the current owner at Darlington show recently. It is very impressive and captures the Distillery atmosphere superbly.

 

Martyn.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The test piece is looking very good, like the way the colours on the second piece have been weathered.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, hayfield said:

The test piece is looking very good, like the way the colours on the second piece have been weathered.

 

.. a bit of dry brushing with light grey just to get the texture visible. If you can see it in the photos that's a thumbs up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 21/09/2019 at 08:47, hayfield said:

Its very noticable and very impressive, a tallant I sadly lack as I am no artist.

 

I am not an artist - just a good "hack" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Great work there - can I ask what you use to scribe the clay?

 

Apologies if you've already said.

 

Regards,

James

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jamest said:

Hi,

 

Great work there - can I ask what you use to scribe the clay?

 

Apologies if you've already said.

 

Regards,

James

 

Hi James .. for this building I tried using a steel scribing tool to mark the horizontal courses (see photo) but the blunt end of a needle file to separate each stone.

 

I'm still experimenting but this should be fine for this model.

76054.jpg

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.. another micro-update on the distillery - partly for my amusement as a record of progress.

If anyone else is interested, here is the result of a couple of hours scratching and fettling

 

 

braeside-distillery-15a.jpg

  • Like 9
  • Craftsmanship/clever 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like a dentists tool to me. I have also heard these deep hand-held scribing tools called a "skrawker" as well, a term I first encountered in RM and MRC magazines in the mid-70s.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

That looks like a dentists tool to me. I have also heard these deep hand-held scribing tools called a "skrawker" as well, a term I first encountered in RM and MRC magazines in the mid-70s.

 

As someone who has been visiting a dentist recently, my scribing tool does look like something in the denist's armoury!

 

PS There are indeed some threads on here about 'skrawkers' - are they a kind of hooked gouging knife?  I don't know good they would be for scribing something like dry clay .. they look likely to inadvertently rip the clay from its substrate.

 

What do you think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the day when they first got mentioned skrawkers were the thing to scribe stonework. They were hand cut from other old tools so could be whatever shape/width/sharpness you needed. I suppose these days you can buy them off the shelf from the modelling tool suppliers. I think they get used for scribing wagon planking in plasticard too, maybe that is there more common use.

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When i saw the tool you were using I went alooking for my skrawker but I can't lay my hands on it atm (I wonder what the hell I've done with it). I used instead of a scriber because mortar courses aren't V shaped.  I made mine from a broken hacksaw blade ground out in the shape of a lino knife and It has been made to fit in a heavy duty craft knife handle. It works very well on plastic but tbh I have never tried it on plaster/Das.

Regards Lez.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, lezz01 said:

When i saw the tool you were using I went alooking for my skrawker but I can't lay my hands on it atm (I wonder what the hell I've done with it). I used instead of a scriber because mortar courses aren't V shaped.  I made mine from a broken hacksaw blade ground out in the shape of a lino knife and It has been made to fit in a heavy duty craft knife handle. It works very well on plastic but tbh I have never tried it on plaster/Das.

Regards Lez.

 

I used the scriber to mark the courses but the blunt end of a small file to finish - as you say, I didn't want v-shaped mortar courses. We'll see how it translates once I start painting the stonework!

PS Good luck with the skrawker hunt - in my experience, start with the least likely place first! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.