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15 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

Back in the day when they first got mentioned skrawkers were the thing to scribe stonework. They were hand cut from other old tools so could be whatever shape/width/sharpness you needed. I suppose these days you can buy them off the shelf from the modelling tool suppliers. I think they get used for scribing wagon planking in plasticard too, maybe that is there more common use.

 

Judging by recent threads, the make-it-yourself route is still popular and re-purposing broken hacksaw blades seems "the thing".

PS I think some of the hand-rendering techniques are still fairly obscure and not widely catered-for by tool makers

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Well I do have a box with "if you can't find it it's probably in here!" written on it, not original I will confess but apt nonetheless. Now if only I can remember where THAT is we could be in business.

Regards Lez.   

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9 minutes ago, lezz01 said:

Well I do have a box with "if you can't find it it's probably in here!" written on it, not original I will confess but apt nonetheless. Now if only I can remember where THAT is we could be in business.

Regards Lez.   

If it is like mine, is it a very large box with it's own internal organisational issues?

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Yep dat's der bunny.

Regards Lez.

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I think the skrawker/old knife blade/modified hacksaw blade/widget tool opportunities are just not there for the model tool suppliers because any such tool is so personal to its user and so home-made is probably how 90% of these things are.

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1 hour ago, brylonscamel said:

If it is like mine, is it a very large box with it's own internal organisational issues?

My box is 27ft by 8ft and mostly full of model railway. However I am confident what I need is in that container.

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6 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

My box is 27ft by 8ft and mostly full of model railway. However I am confident what I need is in that container.

 

I could say the same of my box [insert dimensions of house]

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Absolutely stunning work! The craftsmanship that’s gone into these buildings is just phenomenal 

 

Will

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On 23/09/2019 at 17:58, brylonscamel said:

 

Hi James .. for this building I tried using a steel scribing tool to mark the horizontal courses (see photo) but the blunt end of a needle file to separate each stone.

 

I'm still experimenting but this should be fine for this model.

76054.jpg

Looks just exactly like the scribers we used in the RAF for marking out sheet metal repairs.

 

Also used doctored hacksaw blades to make "skin knives" for cutting aluminium alloy where you weren't able to chain drill through because of primary structure underneath

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19 hours ago, Southwich said:

Absolutely stunning work! The craftsmanship that’s gone into these buildings is just phenomenal 

 

Will

 

Cheers Will - that's a great bit of feedback *blush*

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12 hours ago, KDG said:

Looks just exactly like the scribers we used in the RAF for marking out sheet metal repairs.

 

Also used doctored hacksaw blades to make "skin knives" for cutting aluminium alloy where you weren't able to chain drill through because of primary structure underneath

 

... interesting that even then you were using re-purposed hacksaw blades - the impression you get of aviation engineering is that it is all hi-tech, almost surgical stuff!

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8 hours ago, brylonscamel said:

 

... interesting that even then you were using re-purposed hacksaw blades - the impression you get of aviation engineering is that it is all hi-tech, almost surgical stuff!

It mostly is....was doing airframe repairs up until 2002 and then promoted and posted. Skin knife was a "work-a-round".

 

Loving the distillery buildings.

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14 hours ago, KDG said:

It mostly is....was doing airframe repairs up until 2002 and then promoted and posted. Skin knife was a "work-a-round".

 

Loving the distillery buildings.

 

Thanks for the insight Andy - always happy to hear some personal stories! Oh and thanks for the comment about the distillery - I should be moving onto paintwork and detailing soon, hopefully it will start bringing the little collection of buildings to life.

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Oh dear! It looks like I'll have to get my skates on, there has already been a delivery of casks at the distillery ..

 

braeside-distillery-16a.jpg

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This was taken at the start and reveals the date:  27th July - so we are almost at the 2 month mark. I was hoping to get it finished - (or at least close) within 2 months - so this weekend might be rather busy!

It's just as well it's set to be wet/unsettled/ rainy here in Bristol and I won't be distracted by any outdoor adventures.

 

braeside-distillery-00.jpg

Edited by brylonscamel
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2 hours ago, brylonscamel said:

Oh dear! It looks like I'll have to get my skates on, there has already been a delivery of casks at the distillery ..

 

 

You could set the layout in winter and call it finished.

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57 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

You could set the layout in winter and call it finished.

 

Done! .. onto the next project in pristine white-card and styrene?

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On 19/09/2019 at 12:24, brylonscamel said:

I kept a bit of clay-on-card aside to try out scribing  & colouring combinations before I start on the actual distillery buildings.

The distilleries I have been eyeing up are the Aberdeenshire ones which are largely in rough / dressed granite. I rather like the ones that contain granite in a pink hue amongst the greys.

I have a couple of books on distilleries and found photos of buildings at Aberlour distillery which were the sort of thing I was looking to emulate ..

 

braeside-distillery-13c.jpg

Aberlour A'bunadh (about 60% proof), my favourite tipple!

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10 hours ago, malcolmcelyn said:

Aberlour A'bunadh (about 60% proof), my favourite tipple!

 

That's a potent tipple!

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59 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

It was used in the Saturn V rocket motors ;)

No wonder I feel 'spacey' after a dram!

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Ha! The missiles my unit had in the army used UDMH and URFNA. Now that **** will really blow your socks off. :help:

Regards Lez.

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1 hour ago, lezz01 said:

Ha! The missiles my unit had in the army used UDMH and URFNA. Now that **** will really blow your socks off. :help:

Regards Lez.

 

Quite literally "rocket fuel"?

 

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Oh yes mate proper rocket fuel. 

Unsymmetrical Dimethyl Hydrazine and Uninhibited Red Fuming Nitric Acid. Does a lot more than "blow the bloody doors off" on that you can trust me. Get any on you and all that's left is a squishy puddle in nothing flat and that's one at a time. Both together and there's a big bang and your ass is going past St Pete at a gazillion miles a second. Really, REALLY NASTY stuff!!! Its about the same nasty gunk the Germans used in the V2's and Me 163's. Fortunately it was all sealed away in the missiles where no one could get at it. If any was laying around something had gone really pete tong.

Regards Lez.    

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On 27/09/2019 at 22:59, lezz01 said:

Oh yes mate proper rocket fuel. 

Unsymmetrical Dimethyl Hydrazine and Uninhibited Red Fuming Nitric Acid. Does a lot more than "blow the bloody doors off" on that you can trust me. Get any on you and all that's left is a squishy puddle in nothing flat and that's one at a time. Both together and there's a big bang and your ass is going past St Pete at a gazillion miles a second. Really, REALLY NASTY stuff!!! Its about the same nasty gunk the Germans used in the V2's and Me 163's. Fortunately it was all sealed away in the missiles where no one could get at it. If any was laying around something had gone really pete tong.

Regards Lez.    

 

Thanks Lez - thanks to this discussion I ended up utterly sidetracked reading about the first man to (most likely) break the sound-barrier in some awful, madcap contraption the Germans devised at the end of the last war. The usual story of bravery, desperation and tragedy. The contraption was partially fuelled by the chemicals you described.

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