Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Back to the drinkable beverages, here's the weekend's progress on painting and fettling.

The first go at the stonework is pragmatic. Starting with the kiln, I decided on this approach - an "I've got a lot of stones to paint in a short time" solution to reproduce the style of stonework at the Highland / Aberdeenshire distilleries.

 

braeside-distillery-17b.jpg

braeside-distillery-17c.jpg

  • Like 11
  • Craftsmanship/clever 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Here's the long view of the front of the distillery with (left) maltings in primer, kiln fully painted stonework, remaining buildings; mill, mash tuns, washbacks and stills  (right) in white clay

 

braeside-distillery-17e.jpg

  • Like 12
  • Craftsmanship/clever 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry mate it wasn't my intention to distract you from modeling. It was more to illustrate the fact that whiskey, no mater how potent, isn't like rocket fuel in any way at all. Although you can build a rocket motor that runs on paraffin/kerosene quite well it's still not whiskey. It might be more effective running on whiskey but a lot more expensive for sure. Not to mention the terrible waste of a good Scotch.

Regards Lez.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I have to say it's all coming on a treat mate. Nothing short of spectacular.

Regards Lez.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, lezz01 said:

Well I have to say it's all coming on a treat mate. Nothing short of spectacular.

Regards Lez.

 

Thanks Lez - more progress to come at the weekend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 30/09/2019 at 11:13, brylonscamel said:

 

Thanks Lez - thanks to this discussion I ended up utterly sidetracked reading about the first man to (most likely) break the sound-barrier in some awful, madcap contraption the Germans devised at the end of the last war. The usual story of bravery, desperation and tragedy. The contraption was partially fuelled by the chemicals you described.

The curious side roads our hobby takes us down eh?

I recall finding out that there were never Frisian cows in the UK until after WWII because of my interest in model railways, or the wonderful evening I spent researching the history of the British pressed aluminium dustbin. Quite an eye-opener I can tell you!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Martin S-C said:

The curious side roads our hobby takes us down eh?

I recall finding out that there were never Frisian cows in the UK until after WWII because of my interest in model railways, or the wonderful evening I spent researching the history of the British pressed aluminium dustbin. Quite an eye-opener I can tell you!

 

... added benefit, we all become micro-experts - and I now know who to contact when sourcing regionally-accurate, era-specific aluminium bins!

  • Like 1
  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.. some beading added to the cupola - in real life a copper clad structure that tops off the kiln

braeside-distillery-17d.jpg

  • Like 11
  • Craftsmanship/clever 5
  • Friendly/supportive 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that cupola it a true work of art mate. Did you take stage by stage pics if so you could do a masterclass on that alone.

Regards Lez. 

  • Agree 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, lezz01 said:

Now that cupola it a true work of art mate. Did you take stage by stage pics if so you could do a masterclass on that alone.

Regards Lez. 

 

I rather neglected the photography of the cupola but I made this sketch for a fellow modeller ... 

 

 

cupola-diag-01.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Craftsmanship/clever 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hoped to have it finished but there's still a list of 12 things to do and some more purchases to be made.

 

Like all good rail projects it's overdue and over budget!

 

  • Funny 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I may offer one small piece of constructive criticism. The walls are a masterpiece but the roofs are a tad uniform. Slates are just the same as walls there are variations in colour on every slate roof too, even new ones' although they aren't so pronounced on new ones'. Some are almost black and some are a browny grey even very light grey as to appear almost white, moss and lichen grow on them too so there will be patches of colour as well as the grey shades. Greens of many shades, off white and yellow can all be seen on a roof. Don't forget about the lead either new lead is shiny metal, old lead is a dull pale grey in fact really old lead is so pale it's off white. Of course if you haven't really started addressing the roof weathering forget everything I've just written and I await the weathered roof with eager anticipation. 

Regards Lez. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, lezz01 said:

If I may offer one small piece of constructive criticism. The walls are a masterpiece but the roofs are a tad uniform.

 

Hi Lez - you're right, these are virgin tiles which are top of the list of 12 things I still need to do.

 

However, your comment is welcome, it's provided me with a good set of observations to work against!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

may I ask what material you have used for the walls of your destillery?

 

Markus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, McRuss said:

Hello,

 

may I ask what material you have used for the walls of your destillery?

 

Markus

Hi Markus .. the carcasses of the buildings are made from sheet plastic (for rigidity) and are covered in a layer of 1mm card (greyboard).

 

The final layer is 1mm of DAS modelling clay.

 

The clay is rolled out to 1mm thickness and then applied by hand. 

 

I carved the stonework once everything was nice and dry.

  • Informative/Useful 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These photos were taken when I was still trying some ideas out ..

 

20191008_183600_compress3.jpg

20191011_104306_compress85.jpg

 

20190918_225352_compress86.jpg

Edited by brylonscamel
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we please stop posting photos of real buildings in the modelling section ;) 

 

Stunning work as usual sir!

 

Will

  • Like 1
  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Southwich said:

Can we please stop posting photos of real buildings in the modelling section ;) 

 

Stunning work as usual sir!

 

Will

 

Cheers Will .. I assume you mean the photo of the Aberlour distillery?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, brylonscamel said:

 

Cheers Will .. I assume you mean the photo of the Aberlour distillery?

 

Nope I meant the modelling, joking that your buildings were so good they look real! 

 

I still cant get over how how good your scribing is in the clay!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your answer, so the wall thickness is about 3mm. For rolling out the DAS clay. Are you using some 1mm thick sticks as a height gauge for the rolling pin?

 

Markus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Southwich said:

 

Nope I meant the modelling, joking that your buildings were so good they look real! 

I confess to pulling your leg a little.

 

Thanks for the comments about the scribing.

 

I'm happy with the overall effect but it's been tricky to reproduce the look of Aberdeenshire granite stonework. They seem to use a very wide, shallow pointing between blocks of stone. My scribing is too narrow but the painting has helped disguise this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, McRuss said:

For rolling out the DAS clay. Are you using some 1mm thick sticks as a height gauge for the rolling pin?

 

Hi Markus.. here are some photos of me using a short length of dowel as a rolling pin and a couple of strips of 1mm card as a guide.

 

I think the pictures tell the story.

FB_IMG_1570865495776.jpg

FB_IMG_1570865514214.jpg

FB_IMG_1570865502664.jpg

FB_IMG_1570865520583.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Informative/Useful 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, brylonscamel said:

I confess to pulling your leg a little.

 

Thanks for the comments about the scribing.

 

I'm happy with the overall effect but it's been tricky to reproduce the look of Aberdeenshire granite stonework. They seem to use a very wide, shallow pointing between blocks of stone. My scribing is too narrow but the painting has helped disguise this.


Well played - leg successfully pulled! Love the photos of rolling out the clay, awesome idea!

 

Will

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, brylonscamel said:

 

Hi Markus.. here are some photos of me using a short length of dowel as a rolling pin and a couple of strips of 1mm card as a guide.

 

 

 

That's ingenious, have used DAS to cover before, but never thought about rolling it out between guides to ensure a consistent thickness.

 

Some lovely modelling here :fan:

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.