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I thought I'd jump on the bandwagon, so-to-speak, and start a workbench thread of my own. I've not long started a blog, too, which can be found here Mark's Workbench but I fear that the blog entries may get a bit out of hand with the nitty-gritty of what I do, and more often don't, manage to achieve! The new idea is to post an entry for each completed project on the Blog with a short bio of how it came about, and then hopefully add a link back to the starting point in this thread. But we'll see how that pans out.....

 

One of the more difficult aspects of model-making is the standard to work to. Unfortunately, I'm not a fast worker - continental drift is quicker -  which means that while I strive for excellence I don't want to take forever to achieve it! Thus, I've reached the point where my specification for A N Other Goods Wagon will be:

 

EM Gauge

Etched axleguards with whitemetal, plastic or 3D-printed axlebox/spring assemblies

Rigid underframe (fit inside bearing compensation unit if necessary)

Improved brakegear

Sprung buffers

Couplings - ? - I haven't decided yet but they must be unobtrusive

 

Currently on the bench is one GWR Diagram V5 Covered Goods Wagon (is that a goods wagon that's covered or a wagon for covered goods?). It's the good old CooperCraft kit.

 

The body was assembled as normal, and the floor fitted in the designed place, which in these kits is actually much higher above rail level that the floor would really be. I did invert the floor, though, so as to provide a flat surface for mounting the MJT axleguards. The floor itself was slightly narrow, so a thin fillet of styrene was fitted to prevent the sides bowing inward. Some hefty nuts were then superglued to the inside of the floor to provide weight, and a couple of braces were subesquently fitted across the top of the sides, again to prevent them bowing inward.

 

http://IMG-1072.jpg

 

The etched axleguards were folded up as rigid units, and as my soldering is messy, small dobs of Roket Gel Cyano were used to fix their corners. The pinpoint bearings were also superglued into the axleguards for the same reason, one side at a time to ensure the axles turn freely but without sloppiness. The solebars were stripped of their moulded axleguards and brake hangers, sanded smooth on their backs and, after ensuring that the etched axleguards would fit between them without  futher thinning, were assembled to the floor. A small amount of Squadron Green filler was needed at the ends of the solebars where they meet the headstocks. A couple of ventilation holes were then drilled in the floor to allow solvent fumes to still escape once the roof is on.

 

http://IMG-1074.jpg

 

http://IMG-1081.jpg

 

The axleguards will obviously need to be packed to provide the correct height, and to that end, I've one of Bill Bedford's buffer height gauges that I can use to set this and all my subsequent builds. Unfortunately, I'm a bit disappointed with the sprung buffers I've got. The whitemetal housings are quite badly flashed, not at all like the lovely clean cast housing of the unsprung units I've got from the same manufacturer, and the lost wax brass ones I also ordered aren't that much better and don't look the correct shape. So until I can find some better substitutes, I can't do much more as the running gear all depends on the wheels being correctly located.

 

Cheers for now,

 

Mark

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On the GWR V5 Mink, the CooperCraft solebars are sadly lacking the tucked-under side stanchions of the original, as the moulding was generic and found its way under their open wagon also. So an attempt has been made to replicated this detail on the solebars using Evergreen styrene strip, 0.01"x0.06" for the flat and 0.01"x0.02" for the web of the tee-section. Short lengths of 0.01"x0.02" were also used to represent the webs of the tucked-under parts, their corners will be lightly rounded off when they've been trimmed to length.

 

http://IMG-1085.jpg

 

http://IMG-1083.jpg

 

I haven't decided whether to try to include the rivets, it doesn't seem that noticeable that they're currently missing.

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  • 4 weeks later...

There's been very little progress at my modelling bench for several weeks, what with being away for work and a weekend break in lovely Lynton.

 

Most of the time I've managed to sneak has been devoted to the start of, or perhaps more accurately "false start" of, a batch scratch-build of GWR 3-plank opens, some of which will be finished to depict examples sold to South Wales railways - more of this when there's tangible progress. So far, the method I've always used to scribe planking detail has resulted in badly curled and unusable sides and ends. Admittedly, its a few years (25!) since I last scratchbuilt an open wagon, but I'm not sure what I've done differently/wrong. Anyway, investment in a "proper" scribing tool will hopefully yield some good results after a bit of practice.

 

However, just to prove I've not been totally idle, here is the V5 with its stanchions trimmed and shaped:

 

http://IMG-1092.jpg

 

http://IMG-1090.jpg

 

As you can see, the axleguards are still not correctly packed, there is still no brake gear or buffers, there is still no roof. Oh, well!

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

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Well, my new scriber tool arrived in very short order indeed, and I've been playing at scribing planks on a new batch of GWR 3-plank opens. I'm really rather pleased with the results so far, and itching to press on. Here's what I've managed so far.

 

Each strip is long enough for 2 x sides and 2 x ends, scribed on the outside for the three planks and the curb rail, with just the top two planks being scribed on the inside: 

 

http://IMG-1342.jpg

 

http://IMG-1345.jpg

 

The planks should be a scale 7 inches deep, i.e. 2.33mm in 4mm/1ft scale. However, I've deliberately made the top plank wider at 2.66mm deep to allow for sanding the sides and ends level after assembly. The wide strip below the curb rail will be removed from the sides, for the ends I haven't yet decided how best to tackle the channel-section headstocks, so I may cut this strip to the width of the headstock and file it into a channel at either end, or I may cut it off and use Evergreen channel instead. In the meantime, it's useful for handling purposes!

 

Here, I've scribed in the lengths of the sides and ends, and added the door outline to both sides:

 

http://IMG-1346.jpg

 

http://IMG-1347.jpg

 

At the moment there are enough sets for nine wagons. One of them did suffer from a slight slip of the scriber while marking the door outline and, if built, may end up as a wreck parked in a siding, but I guess that's not a bad outcome! I wasn't planning on building them all anyway, I just wanted to be sure I had enough spares if I make a muck of one or two!

 

Meanwhile, I took half an hour out of the GWR 3-plankers to make a start on this Cambrian Railways 2-plank dropside:

 

http://IMG-1348.jpg

 

It's the Cambrian kit, of course. I've scribed in the floor planks over the moulded raised lines, which hopefully improves the look of the interior. I'm not really very taken with the kit's solebars/underframes, though, so I think I shall replace the solebars with Evergreen strip, suitably detailed. I want to replace the axleguards with some etched ones from Alan at Coast Line Models (@Quarryscapes of this parish), together with his 3D-printed axlebox/spring assemblies and buffers. And I'll need to order some transfers from the Welsh Railways Research Circle before too long.

 

Cheers for now,

 

Mark

Edited by 2996 Victor
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1 hour ago, timbowilts said:

Mark, can I ask what scriber you bought and from where did you get it?

Tim T

All packed up ready to move to Felinfoel

 

Hi Tim,

 

this is the one that I bought first, branded as Tamiya but made by Olfa:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Tamiya-Model-Craft-Tools-Plastic-Scriber-II-74091/263797506699?epid=1717259497&hash=item3d6b8e828b:g:xnMAAOSwHuhanCBj

 

which is identical to this Olfa one:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cutter-P-cutter-S-type-204B-for-the-OLFA-plastic-board/202740566406?epid=0&hash=item2f34478986:g:45AAAOSwXoZdNxwJ

 

And I also bought one of these:

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Olfa-Heavy-Duty-Plastic-Laminate-Cutter-PC-L/163805133458?hash=item26238bfa92:g:leEAAOSw4OBdQVN-

 

this one is slightly bigger, the blade is marginally wider but the cutting edge has the same profile, and the handle is much more ergonomic.

 

Hope all that helps!

 

Best regards,

 

Mark

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This afternoon, I had an almost overwhelming urge to put some paint on the V5 Mink, despite the fact that it's not progressed since I trimmed and shaped the side stanchion tuck-unders. However, I managed to resist - if the bonnet ventilators had been fitted, it might have been a different story.....

 

The Evergreen channel section arrived today, and it'll be perfect for 9" channel solebars and headstocks.

 

For the GWR 3-plank opens, I'll need to be a bit careful of which Lot numbers/running numbers I choose, as a large percentage were built with bulb section rather than channel section solebars. All that means is that the Evergreen channel will need a little careful fettling on one edge, but unfortunately that will have to wait as I'm working away for a few days.

 

Cheers for now,

 

Mark

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Thinking about the GWR 3-plank opens, it has occurred to me that I haven't allowed for one or two round ended examples. Admittedly, most had been rebuilt into square ended form by the 1900-1905 period, which is the time-frame of my planned layout(s).

 

Looks like some scribing is in the offing!

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  • 3 weeks later...

As always, progress is painfully slow, but there has been a small step forward with the GWR V5 Mink.

 

The Bill Bedford 3D-printed buffer housings and OK oil axleboxes arrived, and a set of the former has been fitted.

 

http://IMG-1362.jpg

 

This has allowed me to set the buffer height using a BB gauge, and then pack the axleguards so that it runs at the correct height.

 

http://IMG-1359.jpg

 

http://IMG-1364.jpg

 

http://IMG-1363.jpg

 

The axleguards are a nice tight fit between the inner faces of the solebars, so I'm not going to glue them in until the last possible moment. That will allow me to change the wheelsets for EM ones more easily, and also enable fitting of the sprung buffer heads. Another job for "soon" is drawing up some artwork for an etched set of Dean Churchward brakegear - I'm just not happy with the look of what's currently available, particularly with the geometry of the push rods. I really need to get on with this as this and my planned other DC1-fitted wagons will simply not happen.

 

I haven't yet decided which couplings to go for. I have been thinking Alex Jackson, but I may just stick with 3-link.

 

Not much progress on the Cambrian Railways 2-plank drop-side, although @Quarryscapes has put some very nice Cambrian buffer housings and axlebox/spring assemblies on his Shapeways page, some of which have found their way here :D

 

And in other news, I've embarked on my first ever Slater's Midland Railway D299 open. Encouraged to branch out a bit by all the good work over on @Compound2632's thread here, I made my purchase while at RailEx at Taunton on Sunday. This particular wagon will probably be out-shopped in S&DJR livery, and I have a 3-plank drop-side from the same stable (D305?) which may well follow suit.

 

As ever, I hope to make more tangible progress.....

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

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Hi Mark, I've only just found this, lots of interesting stuff already!

 

On 09/09/2019 at 15:15, 2996 Victor said:

On the GWR V5 Mink, the CooperCraft solebars are sadly lacking the tucked-under side stanchions of the original

 

Lovely work you've done to rectify that, very neat.

 

On 07/10/2019 at 12:33, 2996 Victor said:

Well, my new scriber tool arrived in very short order indeed, and I've been playing at scribing planks on a new batch of GWR 3-plank opens.

 

That looks exceptionally good, as if done by a machine.  It's rarely just about the scriber though, clearly very steady and precise work. Those 3-plankers are going to be special I think.

 

On 29/10/2019 at 15:22, 2996 Victor said:

This happened:

 

http://IMG-1368.jpg

 

Oops!

 

You just couldn't resist, eh? :D

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4 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Hi Mark, I've only just found this, lots of interesting stuff already!

 

 

Lovely work you've done to rectify that, very neat.

 

 

That looks exceptionally good, as if done by a machine.  It's rarely just about the scriber though, clearly very steady and precise work. Those 3-plankers are going to be special I think.

 

 

You just couldn't resist, eh? :D

 

Hi Mikkel,

 

many thanks for kind words - high praise indeed!

 

I think the V5's stanchion tuck-unders (for want of a better term) work quite well although I haven't added the missing rivet detail, as I don't think it really shows. I've got some rivet transfers to try out, so when I've had a go on something more accessible, I might possibly add them. And no, I just couldn't resist - I had trouble holding out as long as I did, and after I'd added the bonnet ventilators to the ends, well that was it! What is your opinion of the colour? Its Tamiya TS-33 Dull Red (aerosol) - I think it works quite nicely for a relatively new vehicle, which will be lightly weathered when its finally finished. I'd very much appreciate your thoughts.

 

I haven't made any further progress on the 3-plankers, I'm afraid. I'm actually quite surprised and rather pleased with how well the scribing turned out, although perhaps I should try a 7-planker or a van next to see how good at it I really am :unsure: Next step is to add the hinge straps, washer plates and stanchions/knees to the sides and ends, and add the door hinges. I'm mulling over the best way to make the latter convincing. There's also some Evergreen half-round strip waiting for the curb rail between the door hinges. I'll probably add the corner plates to the ends before assembly, but leave the ones on the sides until after, as they can be used to help hide the corner joints.

 

In the meantime, thanks to Stephen @Compound2632 and his D299 thread, I seem to be going off at yet another tangent with a couple of items of S&DJR stock! I think I ought to just give in and build whatever takes my fancy - I have a hankering for an Midland D301 high-sided wagon in S&D livery, and Midland D306 Sleeper Wagon.....

 

Kind regards,

 

Mark

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7 hours ago, 2996 Victor said:

In the meantime, thanks to Stephen @Compound2632 and his D299 thread, I seem to be going off at yet another tangent 

 

Wikipedia:

 

Quote

"In Greek mythology, the Sirens were dangerous creatures, who lured nearby sailors with their enchanting music and singing voices to shipwreck on the rocky coast of the Midland Railway."

 

:D

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2 minutes ago, Mikkel said:

Haha, I know what you mean. So many railways, so little time :)

 

Absolutely! Which is one reason why I'm thinking of allowing myself a bit more leeway when it comes to impossible items of rolling stock.

 

For instance, the LT&SR Fish Vans, whose livery is undetermined but thought to be a light blue or light green. There were two and they would never have appeared in West Somerset or Wales, but..... The louvres might be a bit taxing, though! :D

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And speaking of leeway in my choices of rolling stock, here's the start of something which would never have ventured into the territory that I am purporting to model, a Midland Railway Diagram D307 Sleeper Wagon, a six-plank open wagon on which the upper three planks form a drop flap.

 

First up is a photo of the sides and ends scribed for the planks and a handling strip along the bottom. As the planks used in the side and end sheeting of wagons is chamfered at its top outer edge to aid water run-off, after the initial pass with the scribing tool, I've tried a new technique of holding the tool at a 45 degree angle to hopefully emulate this. I think it might show once painted, but at this stage it's hard to tell if its made any difference. In Bob Essery's Midland Wagons, the photograph of No.4887 at Plate 168 shows the joint between the third and fourth planks as a wider line when compared to the other planks. This is, of course, the joint of the drop flap, which was yet to be scribed deeper when I took this shot: 

 

http://IMG-1371.jpg

 

Here are the sides and ends assembled around the floor, with the headstocks and solebars added. The joint on the sides between the bottom fixed planks and the drop flap planks has been accentuated here - hopefully, it looks the part! I've also worked on the ends of these top planks, as they're visible on the real thing, of course. For the flooring, I've cheated slightly and used 40thou thickness Evergreen V-groove sheeting, the grooves at 2mm spacing. I'm not certain yet whether I might regret not scribing my own..... The headstocks and solebars are Evergreen 60thou x 125thou strip, lightly corner sanded to take the sharpness off. This material is fractionally deeper than indicated in Midlands Wagons, but I felt this small compromise would be worthwhile for the uniformity of the material. The headstocks are deliberately a bit prominent, and will be filed down once the corner plates have been added:

 

http://IMG-1374.jpg

 

Its come out nice and square, and I may build it rigid or compensated, I haven't decided yet. The W-irons are MJT GWR/RCH type, which may or may not be used, but were used to check the clearance between the solebars, and the "extras" on the MJT fret - crown plates etc - will be used to help detail the latter. I also need to get some axlebox/spring assemblies, which will be 3D-prints from Bill Bedford's Shapeways page.

 

As mentioned above, I've got no use for this wagon when its finished but I thought, well, why not?

 

Cheers for now,

 

Mark

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Some progress was made over the weekend, in between domestic chores.

 

The scratchbuild of the Midland D307 Sleeper Wagon continued with the addition of its' end pillars. These were from 60thou square Evergreen strip which, as it was a bit oversize, was progressively sanded down squarely to 50thou before being cut into over-long lengths and attached to the ends. When dry, these were trimmed to length and carefully filed to a taper. Apologies for the slightly odd light in this photo:

 

http://IMG-1378.jpg

 

In the meantime, I've been assembling some Midland D299 5-plank opens and D305 3-plank drop-sides, from the Slater's kits, of course. In this case, I'm using the kits more as scratch aids, with the kit sides/ends on scratch-built underframes. Not sure yet if its going to be worth the extra effort..... These D299s are new efforts, as the previous one ended up with its floor out of kilter, despite my best efforts. For all four of these, I decided to adopt a slightly different approach to assembly. In each case, I assembled one side to one end, ensuring the corner plates and planks lined up, and that they were squarely assembled both horizontally and vertically, until I ended up with eight sid/end pairs (4 x D299, 4 x D305). Once these had hardened, I then joined two side/end assemblies together, again being careful with corner plate and plank alignment, and ensuring everything was square. The solebars, from Evergreen 60thou x 156thou strip, were cut to length and fixed at each end with a light touch of solvent before floors of 40thou were cut to fit. Happily, I've arrived at wagons which are all-square and have solebars that line up correctly with the headstocks.

 

http://IMG-1382.jpg

 

http://IMG-1383.jpg

 

http://IMG-1386.jpg

 

Axleguards will be MJT with Bill Bedford's @billbedford 3D-printed Ellis axleboxes, and the solebar crownplates etc will come from the detailing bits on the MJT etches. A Cambrian Models Cambrian 4-plank open being mis-assembled in the same way has also crept into the photos. This will have Coast Line Models @Quarryscapes etched axleguards and 3D-printed axleboxes. I haven't worried about interior planking, as they'll all be loaded in some way or sheeted over, although they'll be suitable painted.

 

With open wagons, particularly ones that could have been in traffic a while and have been subject to a hard life, I bow the sides out slightly:

 

http://IMG-1388.jpg

 

I dunk each side in turn in hot water, apply a little pressure to achieve the bowed effect, then hold under running cold water. In this shot, L-R is the Cambrian 4-plank, D305, D305, D299, D299, D307. The two D305s have yet to be tweaked in this way - note how the sides bow inward - most unlikely! I think I've slightly over-done the left-hand D299 a bit, so I'll have to ease that back a little bit!

 

So the numbers of part-built wagons littering my bench is growing rapidly......

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

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Today's modelling consisted of smoothing the raised plank lines on the insides of the sides and ends of a CooperCraft GWR 4-plank open, and then giving them a spray of Tamiya deck tan.

 

And that's it until the weekend :( When the same parts will have the planks  and door outlines reinstated with my skrawker followed by a coat of gloss lacquer and my first attempt at using rivet transfers.....

 

At least, that's the plan!

 

And so yet another part-built wagon joins the burgeoning throng :wacko:

 

Edit:

 

Well, that didn't happen! The parts in question remain painted, un-skrawked and un-bolt-headed! Hope fully sometime soon.....

Edited by 2996 Victor
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There's been a little progress with the scratchbuilt GWR 3-plank opens: seven of them have received their side ironwork and door hinges, and also the half-round wooden fillet that fills the gap between the foot of the door and the curb rail when the door is let down:

 

http://IMG-1417.jpg

 

http://IMG-1416.jpg

 

I haven't done all nine sets: the remaining two were the ones that each had a mistake, so they'll be held in reserve in case of foul-ups! The next stage with these will be the internal bolt-head detail and the end stanchions, followed by assembly and then corner plates.

 

The V5 has also received its proper set of axleguards and EM wheels, and a set of rather nice Bill Bedford 3D-printed OK axlebox/spring assemblies. The latter need waisted bearings, of course.

 

http://IMG-1418.jpg

 

I'd hoped to get the body ironwork on the Midland D307 sleeper wagon done at the same time as the GWR 3-plankers, but I ran out of time so that'll have to wait. However, the kindly postman also brought me some of Mr Bedford's 3D-printed Ellis axlebox/spring assemblies, so as soon as some more etched axleguards arrive, hopefully there'll be some progress on the Midland and S&DJR wagons, too.

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

Edited by 2996 Victor
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Nice scratch builds.  Looks like I'll need to invest in one of those olfa scribers.  I've been using the back edge of a 10A scalpel, but does throw up a burr.  Do you get the same problem with the olfa/ tamiya panel line scriber?

 

If you look at my "my/our carriage scratch building" thread you may see what i mean.

 

Cheers,

 

Scott

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On 11/11/2019 at 12:13, 2996 Victor said:

Some progress was made over the weekend, in between domestic chores.

 

The scratchbuild of the Midland D307 Sleeper Wagon continued with the addition of its' end pillars. These were from 60thou square Evergreen strip which, as it was a bit oversize, was progressively sanded down squarely to 50thou before being cut into over-long lengths and attached to the ends. When dry, these were trimmed to length and carefully filed to a taper. Apologies for the slightly odd light in this photo:

 

http://IMG-1378.jpg

 

In the meantime, I've been assembling some Midland D299 5-plank opens and D305 3-plank drop-sides, from the Slater's kits, of course. In this case, I'm using the kits more as scratch aids, with the kit sides/ends on scratch-built underframes. Not sure yet if its going to be worth the extra effort..... These D299s are new efforts, as the previous one ended up with its floor out of kilter, despite my best efforts. For all four of these, I decided to adopt a slightly different approach to assembly. In each case, I assembled one side to one end, ensuring the corner plates and planks lined up, and that they were squarely assembled both horizontally and vertically, until I ended up with eight sid/end pairs (4 x D299, 4 x D305). Once these had hardened, I then joined two side/end assemblies together, again being careful with corner plate and plank alignment, and ensuring everything was square. The solebars, from Evergreen 60thou x 156thou strip, were cut to length and fixed at each end with a light touch of solvent before floors of 40thou were cut to fit. Happily, I've arrived at wagons which are all-square and have solebars that line up correctly with the headstocks.

 

http://IMG-1382.jpg

 

http://IMG-1383.jpg

 

http://IMG-1386.jpg

 

Axleguards will be MJT with Bill Bedford's @billbedford 3D-printed Ellis axleboxes, and the solebar crownplates etc will come from the detailing bits on the MJT etches. A Cambrian Models Cambrian 4-plank open being mis-assembled in the same way has also crept into the photos. This will have Coast Line Models @Quarryscapes etched axleguards and 3D-printed axleboxes. I haven't worried about interior planking, as they'll all be loaded in some way or sheeted over, although they'll be suitable painted.

 

With open wagons, particularly ones that could have been in traffic a while and have been subject to a hard life, I bow the sides out slightly:

 

http://IMG-1388.jpg

 

I dunk each side in turn in hot water, apply a little pressure to achieve the bowed effect, then hold under running cold water. In this shot, L-R is the Cambrian 4-plank, D305, D305, D299, D299, D307. The two D305s have yet to be tweaked in this way - note how the sides bow inward - most unlikely! I think I've slightly over-done the left-hand D299 a bit, so I'll have to ease that back a little bit!

 

So the numbers of part-built wagons littering my bench is growing rapidly......

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

 

The bowed out sides was a noticeable feature of older mineral wagons that had spent half their lives loaded with coal etc. I don't think it was a problem for merchandise wagons.

 

Nice work though!

 

 

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5 hours ago, Mikkel said:

Hi Mark, this is very inspirational. Your method for building those 3-plankers is a bit of an eye-opener. 

 

Hi Mikkel,

 

thank you! That's very high praise, indeed!

 

For the bolt heads on the ironwork, I'm planning on having a go with rivet decals, but I'm not yet sure whether the ones I've got are big enough! Next stage is to give the sides/ends a thin coat of gloss paint so that the decals stick! After which I can think about separating the parts and assembling the bodies. I think I mentioned somewhere above that I've got some Evergreen channel for the solebars and headstocks.

 

I'm just hoping they look the part when they're finished!

 

Cheers,

 

Mark

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