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To stimulate discussion, post photos and exchange ideas, and (being an open public forum) help encourage others to try S scale modelling.

Deutsche Bundesbahn in S Scale


steverabone
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Whilst I've modelled British S Scale  for many years, Midland Railway in the early 1920s, on my Halifax Midland layout, some time ago I decided that my long held interest in the railways of Germany dating back to the late 1960s deserved to be celebrated in S Scale.

 

The discovery that there are large numbers of excellent card kits of Deutsche Bundesbahn diesel and electric motive power and carriages available free of charge on the Internet in pdf format gave me a way into this type of modelling. The kits which are originally mainly in O Scale were resized to S Scale and printed out in card. They gave a basis on which to start construction, although to get what I wanted they were not used as originally intended!

 

Mechanisms were provided by tramcar bogies (originally from BEC but now available available from KW Trams). The original 16.5mm gauge wheels were replaced with longer axles and Jackson disc wheels by the manufacturer for me at only a minimal extra costs.

 

Over the last year or so a good selection of stock has been constructed to run on a small branch terminal layout. There are two Bo-Bo diesels a centre cab BR212 and a larger BR216 together with two shunting locos. These are a small Kof 4 wheeler and the standard DB BR260 0-6-0. No German 1970s era layout would be complete without one of the small Uerdingen railbuses. Passenger rolling stock is limited to a rake of 4 six-wheel Umbauwagen; these were 1950s rebuilds of pre-war carriages and were the backbone of many DB local and branch services well into the 1970s.

 

There are also a small number of 4 wheel wagons - some modified from the pdf kits whilst others have been scratchbuilt using print outs of scale drawings.

 

The layout is a typical three track branch terminus with a couple of short sidings and for this I utilised Peco code 100 rail and re-gauged pointwork - not something i would do again but it did save a lot of filing point blades using code 100 rails.

 

Virtually everything; rolling stock and on the layout has used card board. Whilst the results aren't always as good as I'd have liked (card has its limitations) I feel that the project has been worthwhile and has produced something that is almost unique. I doubt that there are any other DB S Scale layouts, especially not in cardboard!

 

NOTE: some of the photos were taken on my British S Scale layout, hence the retaining walls.

 

 

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Edited by steverabone
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The images have now been added Alex.

 

When I started modelling in S Scale I decided to record construction in detail on my website - mainly because I often forget how I solved a problem and it is useful to be able to look back over what I did several months or years later.

 

Each of the models I've constructed is described in full detail here, including details of the failures!

 

http://www.steverabone.com/sscalewebsite/modelling_the_d_b.htm

 

A description of building the layout is here:

 

http://steverabone.com/sscalewebsite/new_german_s_scale_layout.html

 

There are similar pages for my Midland Railway and London Midland Region layout which can be accessed from here:

 

http://www.steverabone.com/sscalewebsite/indexpage.htm

 

Edited by steverabone
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Brilliant work.

Though my security does not like one of the websites.

I do like the double tram car bogie idea.

That could be adapted to almost any rail car.

There are some building downloads that would be handy to adapt as well.

Many thanks for posting.

Bernard

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  • 5 months later...

Very impressive modelling. I've modelled DB in HO and can appreciate what you have achieved.

 

One question, could you have substituted plasticard for card in the construction?

 

Second one, there is a fair amount of US stuff available in S, could any of it have been suitably modified? I assume no German S RTR?

 

Thanks

 

steve

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On 03/04/2020 at 20:30, steve1 said:

Very impressive modelling. I've modelled DB in HO and can appreciate what you have achieved.

 

One question, could you have substituted plasticard for card in the construction?

 

Second one, there is a fair amount of US stuff available in S, could any of it have been suitably modified? I assume no German S RTR?

 

Thanks

 

steve

 

My use of card is deliberate - I've been impressed by some of the techniques by German modellers and reported on various forum. I could have used plastic but why not use a more environmentally friendly and cheaper material? I first started using card for my Midland Railway s Scale coaches about 15 years ago and they have remained absolutely stable to this day - that isn't always the case with models made of plastic card.

 

The reason for using British tram mechanisms is that I was able to get precisely the wheelbases I needed without having to hack up expensive a rtr American chassis.

 

You are correct there is currently no German S Scale - after all S Scale is an imperial scale so obviously USA and UK and NZ seem to be the main countries where it is commom(ish).

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 05/04/2020 at 16:38, steverabone said:

 

You are correct there is currently no German S Scale - after all S Scale is an imperial scale so obviously USA and UK and NZ seem to be the main countries where it is commom(ish).

Indeed there is currently no S in Germany, but there has been in the fifties (and also in France). I wrote a small article with pictures about it, see attachment. All very toy-like; this German Baureihe 05 with train is the most scale like:

P1170305.JPG.0309f862116ef717dde68d1352da3b17.JPG

 

Regards

Fred

S_trains_made_in_Europe_(Germany,_France,_England).pdf

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 year later...

I'm afraid that my layouts are not portable and the baseboards are actually supported by the walls on brackets. In any case my exhibiting days are over as I ceased to enjoy it.

 

This link will take you to a short video of the layout in action.

 

http://www.steverabone.com/sscalewebsite/German video with sound.mp4

Edited by steverabone
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I thought some of you might like to see my latest S Scale models which are DB Silberling passenger coaches. These were the standard regional/ suburban coach found every where in Germany. The had a distinctive fish-scale like pattern on the special no rusting steel used for the bodyside. This is difficult to reproduce in model form but as you will see there is a way!

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They are once again built almost completely from card - just the bogie inner frames and wheels are metal. The sides are print outs of photographs of the sides of the latest Piko HO models which have been re-scaled from images found on a review of the models on a German website. The roof is card with a little epoxy resin used as a filler on the roof end domes.

 

The models are run as a two coach push-pull train with my BR212 diesel - this makes an ideal 1970s/80s branch train.

 

Full details of construction are on my model blog on my website:

https://www.steverabone.com/sscalewebsite/building_a_silberlinge.html

 

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Blimey Steve, you certainly like a challenge! Very impressive, I had no idea card could be made to look this good. They look the biz!

 

(By coincidence I've just been catching up on unread articles in the latest issue of Traction because I've just realised the next one is imminent and I am somewhat behind with my reading!)

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Yes I like a challenge but the real reason is that by modelling in a scale that very few use and in a material that is often looked down on I end up with models that are unique, even if they are nowhere near the standard of some modeller's work or ready to run models.

 

 

Edited by steverabone
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