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RevolutioN Trains announce Class A Tank and MTV "Zander" in N

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The A class tanks are very interesting. Just need to wait and see what liveries will be offered. 

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An update from RevolutioN:

 

Class-A-Esso-GFX-1024x434.jpg

 

Class A and Zander cruise into view… from Revolution!

 

Revolution Trains – the company set up to use crowdfunding methods to bring niche models to the British model railway market – has confirmed that it will be offering the much-requested Class A tanker in 2020.

 

This is a logical follow-on to Revolution’s well-received Class B tanker, which was delivered to customers in 2017.

 

Joining it (as it shares the chassis) will be the widely used MTV box wagon conversion; these were also used by the engineers with the fishkind name “Zander.”

 

The Class A tanker was designed in the late 1950s at the same time as the Class B – with which it shares many common parts – but with a longer barrel as in service it carried lighter fuels.

 

Originally painted silver, for much of the 1960s and 70s these wagons ran in the mandated livery of pale grey tank with red solebar to indicate that the contents were highly flammable. 

 

It is anticipated that original and revised Esso liveries will be offered along with Mobil and Stavely Chemicals.  In later years some were also used on weedkilling trains, bearing Nomix-Chipman colours.

 

In 1975 150 es-Esso tank wagons received box bodies for use on minerals, stone, sand and aggregate traffic.  Recoded MTV under TOPS, many were later used by the engineers; recoded ZTV and named Zanders where they were used alongside other departmental wagons such as the Revolution Sturgeon track carriers. 

 

Originally a chocolate brown with distinctive “STONE” branding, some were also given the popular grey and yellow “Dutch” colours when in engineering use.

 

As well as the two new items of tooling, Revolution is proposing another run of its  Class B tankers in one new livery and the most popular existing versions.

 

For more information see www.revolutiontrains.com

 

Zander-GFX-1024x247.jpg

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v nice

 

what year did the class a tanker run up to? what were their last use and on what traffic flows? 

 

cheers

 

tim

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On 04/10/2019 at 10:28, AY Mod said:

 

Originally a chocolate brown with distinctive “STONE” branding, some were also given the popular grey and yellow “Dutch” colours when in engineering use.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/Zander-GFX-1024x247.jpg.ea77d871f5d47d70030a6fc02a37b66e.jpg

 

I'll admit I had never thought of them as being chocolate brown! This is 016 when nearly new https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/mtvzander/e3fb26c27 

 

The Zander name doesn't appear to have been used until the late 1980s.

 

Paul

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On 20/10/2019 at 23:58, hmrspaul said:

 

I'll admit I had never thought of them as being chocolate brown! This is 016 when nearly new https://PaulBartlett.zenfolio.com/mtvzander/e3fb26c27 

 

The Zander name doesn't appear to have been used until the late 1980s.

 

Paul

 

Hi Paul,

 

It doesn't look like bauxite and chocolate brown seemed as descriptive as I could manage!  Is there a "proper" name for the colour of these wagons?

 

cheers

 

Ben A.

Edited by Ben A

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On 31/10/2019 at 22:13, Ben A said:

 

Hi Paul,

 

It doesn't look like bauxite and chocolate brown seemed as descriptive as I could manage!  Is there a "proper" name for the colour of these wagons?

 

cheers

 

Ben A.

 

Post-1964 Freight Brown? 

 

Later edit to confirm as noted by David Larkin in Wagons of the Early British Rail Era (1969-1982 period) that the initial livery was indeed Freight Brown with markings mostly as your illustration A pool number was not always present and, if it was, not necessarily in the prescribed manner. I'll be interested in some of these as Paul Bartlett has a number of photos of them at Warrington in the late-1970s conveying sand. This could have been for either the manufacture of detergent Crosfields Warrington)or glass (Pilkingtons St Helens) as both these industries are present in the area.

 

David

Edited by DavidLong
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