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Building a London Road Models K2/2 Kit

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I have now assembled all the parts necessary to start building a London Road Models K2 2-6-0 kit. I will construct the K2/2 side window cab version that operated on the Scottish Region since the completed model is destined for the Bentley Model Railway Group's "Kannotburn" layout. 

 

I am using Alan Gibson wheels, a Mashima 14/20 motor and a multibox two stage gearbox supplied by Branchlines. I do have the small matter of completing the Alan Gibson ex LSWR G6 kit but as soon as this is finished I shall start. I do not claim to be an expert or anything similar more an "improver" working through a large-ish collection of white metal and brass loco kits and learning much from each construction. An image of the prototype follows, interesting loco's designed and built before the great Gresley became enamoured of three cylinder engines ( I'm not forgetting the J38/9s).

 

IMG_20170227_0026-L.jpg.126aede1445cf4bf0295d53ae47d28bb.jpg

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B 

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A couple of pointers for you, which have been mentioned elsewhere.

 

If you are building the loco with hornblocks which can be set with the coupling rods and will allow the wheels to drop out, you should be OK with the kit as it is.

 

If you wish to build it rigid, you may find a slight difference between the axle centres and the rod centres, which happened as they were on separate artwork and were scaled slightly differently by the etchers. It is only slight and if you are aware of it before assembly you can adjust the rod length accordingly.

 

You may also find that it is worth looking at altering the cylinder/valve gear parts to allow the cylinders to be removed. A spacer added across the top of the frames and the cylinders and a nut and bolt will do the trick. The kit was designed to have the cylinders soldered in and them the wheels dropped in from below afterwards. It can be done like that but it makes testing and painting tricky!

 

Good luck and I look forward to seeing how you get on. I used to sit opposite Malcolm Crawley as he was designing the kit and I tried to talk him round on the cylinders many times and failed!

 

Tony Gee

 

 

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Richard

 

Just to add to Tony's helpful post, the K2 kit leaves VERY little space between the coupling rods/ crankpins on the leading drivers and the connecting rod/crosshead/slidebar assembly. I built mine as a rigid chassis, and followed a tip from Tony Wright and separated the cylinder block into 2 parts - i.e LH and RH sides, and eased the cylinder block out 1mm or so on each side. I'm almost certain I soldered the block(s) in place. It isn't really visible when the loco and chassis are fitted together. Otherwise, I'm sure you will enjoy the kit - it's not the most straightforward, but produces a nice loco.

John

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Thanks so much Tony and John. Such tips make such a difference. It will be a week or two before I can report any progress but will keep you posted.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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HI Richard, I have built two of these kits now, although the 7mm version which was an upscale of the LRM kits.

 

Not a bad kit at all, though i don't envy you doing the part where the front frames fit to the smokebox saddle...

 

JB.

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Thanks JB - will take care when I get to the smokebox saddle/frame. 

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

Edited by 30368
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Have now started the K2/2. It is a complex kit and the etches are very tightly packed. In particular the "jig" to support the delicate side valances on the main portion of the running plate is absolutely packed with many parts you need later in the build so be very careful bending the jig and secondly separating it from the running plate after you have soldered the valances to same.

 

Because you have no access to the inside of the valance I used solder paste to tack the valance to the running plate applying the iron to the top of the running plate. When secure, I separated the jig from the valances and then re-soldered from the back of the valance.

 

1449334287_IMG_5073(2).JPG.7698f09bdca8a0e4eaa970818ac8a0db.JPG

 

Running plate and jig.

 

2017749477_IMG_5072(2).JPG.efdbfb33df82500f939202a834b4d62e.JPG

Running plate, note spigots joining valance to jig, some careful filing required!

 

182616150_IMG_5075(2).JPG.3c2200932971b8d10b4e0523ddfcff1d.JPG

 

Completed and after initial clean up.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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Richard, I don't believe you want to take the valance and footplate off of the jig until after the boiler and smokebox have been attached. This keeps it all straight flat and square until the boiler holds everything in place.

 

Is there any way you can reattach to the jig?

 

JB. 

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Thanks JB I can see the logic of what you say. On other builds using a similar jig I have usually removed it following the attachment of the valances without detriment. 

Whilst the K2 is particularly tricky given its split running plate etc I plan to use the two body/chassis fixing points on the main running plate as a reference point to the chassis to ensure that all is level and square. I tend also to use the cab spectacle plate as a reference point whilst fitting the boiler assembly. I will report back and I have no problem with admitting I got it wrong! 

 

I appreciate your help.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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No problems Richard,

 

As an aside, i just realised i had these from a few years back...

 

 

Sadly all of the old RMWeb stuff has been deleted. A great deal of valuable content lost from a lot of people. oh well onwards and upwards.

 

JB.

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I have built a few PDK kits, and my advice would be to leave the valance/jig attached as long as you can, for extra security. Having said that, it's impossible to fit the cylinders/ valve gear with it still in place and I tend to remove it once I have the chassis carcase assembled and checked that all is level, nut and bolt holes between chassis and footplate aligned, and I tend to have soldered the cab in place to keep the back square. But as long as you can handle the footplate without distorting, I don't suppose it really matters. I do think, though, that in principle , at least for beginners, it is better to leave the valance as supplied while fitting to the footplate, and then remove the bottom part later in the build. 

This thread has tempted me to think about building a Scottish K2, having found a photo of 1 passing my prototype location in 1957 heading for Tyneside, Goodness knows what it was doing there an a Class B freight.

John

 

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John,

 

I have this kit in my "to do pile".

 

One thought I've had is that there is very little clearance between the wheel flanges and the splashers. The General Arrangement (P-61 available for £7.50 from the NRM as it's in the Oxford Microfilm collection), shows that a scale flange is already slightly above top of footplate level. And the splasher is only about five inches deep.

 

So is it going to be P4 or EM/OO? I think this makes a difference to how you select the wheels.

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13 hours ago, davelester said:

And the splasher is only about five inches deep.

 

Measuring this morning, I make that just three inches. Or 1mm in OO.

 

A coarse OO flange might easily be 1mm.

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The problem of parts being incorporated within the jig can be mitigated by removing the parts whilst still in the flat, then soldering in lengths of scrap brass, or whatever, to maintain rigidity. 

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The model will be 00 and the wheels are Alan Gibson.

 

Thanks for all the suggestions guys.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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Given all the comments I thought I might reiterate my opening statement, in no way do I see myself as an expert loco builder but I do think that my skills are improving with each new build so I am always trying to learn something new. 

 

I would say though that this London Road Models kit is complex. The etches are tightly packed with a host of some very tiny parts so great care is required in removing them from the etch. Perhaps related to this is the very high number of "bridges" between larger parts and the surrounding parts which results in much cutting and filing before they can be used. I should add that I am happy to work my way through all the challenges because I think the result will be a very good model of the prototype.

 

I would not though recommend it to a beginner or to someone who has built whitemetal kits. Best to start with a brass/nickel-silver kits from someone else. I have no desire to offend anyone with these comments but it is well to perhaps avoid someone buying a kit and then giving up and never progressing through to one of the most rewarding parts of our hobby, building loco's!

 

A little progress, we have been away to Leeds for Opera North - recommend there current production Handel's Giulio Cesare. 

 

55045486_IMG_5076(2).JPG.82f8a8e099b9d2b020244fd3c527ba66.JPG

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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On 17/10/2019 at 15:21, 30368 said:

Given all the comments I thought I might reiterate my opening statement, in no way do I see myself as an expert loco builder but I do think that my skills are improving with each new build so I am always trying to learn something new. 

 

I would say though that this London Road Models kit is complex. The etches are tightly packed with a host of some very tiny parts so great care is required in removing them from the etch. Perhaps related to this is the very high number of "bridges" between larger parts and the surrounding parts which results in much cutting and filing before they can be used. I should add that I am happy to work my way through all the challenges because I think the result will be a very good model of the prototype.

 

I would not though recommend it to a beginner or to someone who has built whitemetal kits. Best to start with a brass/nickel-silver kits from someone else. I have no desire to offend anyone with these comments but it is well to perhaps avoid someone buying a kit and then giving up and never progressing through to one of the most rewarding parts of our hobby, building loco's!

 

 

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

I don't think John Redrup at LRM, nor I when I help him at at shows, would suggest that this is a beginners kit. There are others in the sixty plus range of LRM loco kits that are far better suited to a beginner. We usually suggest a tank loco as a better beginners kit but a J3 or J4, with a straight footplate, would also be a good introduction to building a GNR/LNER tender loco.

 

It is often difficult to get a novice builder to recognise that is a good idea to start on something like an etched van or wagon for their first build, most being attracted to locomotive above all else.

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1 hour ago, Jol Wilkinson said:

 

I don't think John Redrup at LRM, nor I when I help him at at shows, would suggest that this is a beginners kit. There are others in the sixty plus range of LRM loco kits that are far better suited to a beginner. We usually suggest a tank loco as a better beginners kit but a J3 or J4, with a straight footplate, would also be a good introduction to building a GNR/LNER tender loco.

 

It is often difficult to get a novice builder to recognise that is a good idea to start on something like an etched van or wagon for their first build, most being attracted to locomotive above all else.

Perhaps ??. Mark "beginner kits" on the LRM webpage either with a akerisk or as a seperate part of the list for each company. One obvious problem what is a beginner kit as everybody has their own views on what one is !!

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To be fair, the LRM descriptor for the K2 on the site makes it clear that this is not a kit for the beginner. However, if care is taken, and help sought when needed via this thread, I think a successful build can be achieved.  Just keep posting, Richard - my experience is that there are plenty of folk around to help on RM Web. The 2 previous posters are excellent cases in point, as I know from my own experiences.

 

Edited by rowanj
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Many thanks Rowan, I agree, plenty of help out there and I am not shy to ask.

 

Frames are now in the jig ready to solder the spacers in position. The six 2.5mm holes for the Alan Gibson plunger pickups have been drilled. I am aware of the advice in the instructions regarding the front axle bearings which suggests that the frame is slotted so that the axle can be fitted after the valvegear is assembled. That is the case with many kits. I will look into assembling the valve gear with a few strategic 14/16BA set screws else the wheelset will be fitted before valvegear assembly. 

 

607035971_IMG_5077(2).JPG.bcece737e80cb09df700991dafa5e1ba.JPG

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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Hi, Today's update. Frame spacers now soldered into position whilst in the jig.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1427611605_IMG_5078(2).JPG.a94be842f9c90f937d3005f36586c099.JPG

 

Started to prepare the cylinder crossmembers for soldering into position. Valve guide, crossheads and slid bar casting to fettle and trial fit to the two crossmembers. The castings are very accurate to the prototype but do require some careful fettling to remove casting sprigs and fit to holes in cylinder crossmembers.

 

1653924559_IMG_5080(2).JPG.ec4706643e1e5e90b94ef6f66d03e747.JPG

 

I have left casting sprig on one of the slide bar castings for comparison with the prepared version.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

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Making good progress!

 

If you haven't tried them already, it might be worth setting the frames up in the jig again and trying the coupling rods over the alignment pins. the jig holds the frames in place and gives you a nice extra pair of hands. If you need to adjust the rod lengths, it is easier to do it now rather than later. If you know the rod and axle centres match, it rules out trying to find a fault later.

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A quick update on the build.

 

I spent some time trying to find the coupling rods in the etches and the parts list without success. I admit I may have missed something and have contacted LRM to seek advice. In the meantime I have made up a pair of rods from bullhead rail. Thanks for the advice Tony, I always check coupling rod centres on the jig so will do.

 

I am using a Mashima 14/20 motor and Branchlines two stage gearbox with a strengthening mod.

514978452_IMG_5088(2).JPG.10722d757c8ce1bb0c93569af7eac1c8.JPG

 

This view shows the holes for the Alan Gibson plunger pick-ups. Apart from being very reliable pick-ups they make fitting brake gear so much simpler.

2134624492_IMG_5087(2).JPG.cd2e009f27c1e3d46f75f6e27da2421f.JPG

 

Final view with running plate fitted and coupling rods. I selected a section of rusty rail for a more authentic look when completed!

162703217_IMG_5090(2).JPG.7d35cd8723b5c77732356369f264c1cd.JPG

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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John at London Road Models has dispatched the missing etch for the coupling rods - good service.

 

I have used blackening fluid on the frames rather than paint. The finish is varied but that is fine for a loco that was, by the mid 1950s, around forty years old. The Plant "bosh" and some manual scraping would have left a fairly rough surface for the frame painters.

 

First image shows the frames back in the jig to check coupling rod alignment.

2081247014_IMG_5092(2).JPG.253d381237f691fd9c0b3138a829fe76.JPG

 

Second image shows wheels, motor and gearbox fitted. Wheel quartering needs final adjustment. Should have just enough room for a flywheel without fowling the firebox backplate.

 

1229420193_IMG_5095(2).JPG.92eaeaf770d2a70e12c3606665f0249c.JPG

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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Coupling rods and plunger pickups fitted. Connecting rod halves cut out and ready for soldering together. Incidentally, I suggest it is best to solder connecting rod halves together before removing fret bridge pieces. The halves are very easy to damage.

Chassis tested and runs well from low power inputs so coupling rod centres fairly accurate. They were soldered together before drilling and reaming. 

 

On to the valve gear which does look fiddly. Flywheel temporarily fitted, there should be enough room to fit without troubling the firebox backplate. We shall see...333264721_IMG_5098(2).JPG.d59ce031a4cbb2e14c41be773d587454.JPG

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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