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30368

Building a London Road Models K2/2 Kit

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Posted (edited)

K2/2 is now finished apart from buffers and coupling and draincocks which will be fitted after painting so last pictures in "brass".

 

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Cab roof temporary fit!

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

Edited by 30368
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Why leave the buffers out? Steam loco buffers are all black, not bright and shiny - not even the shank which fits in the housing.

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1 hour ago, Michael Edge said:

Why leave the buffers out? Steam loco buffers are all black, not bright and shiny - not even the shank which fits in the housing.

 

i would agree Mike. Shiny buffers look poor. There is an alternative to fitting them before painting though.

 

i always use chemical blackening on my buffer heads. It seems to be more durable than paint, especially if the buffers are in contact with other vehicles (no Kadees or Tension Locks). Fitting blackened buffers after painting does away with any chance of paint making the springing a bit stiff.

 

I wonder if that is the plan here.

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3 hours ago, Michael Edge said:

Why leave the buffers out? Steam loco buffers are all black, not bright and shiny - not even the shank which fits in the housing.

To my shame, I'd never noticed this - I'd always assumed the shanks were shiny because they moved. But here is FW's filthy J36, with not a shiny shank in sight. 

 

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Flipping heck!

The buffers are sprung so if I fitted them and then painted the loco they probably would not be! On a point of detail, the loco is not for me but for my club built FOC. So I have to ensure I don't let my preferences (which is generally as I remember them, i.e. dirty locos or at best, dirty loco's cleaned and getting dirty again) predominate.

 

I prefer to use blackening fluid as I have for the mainframes. Thanks for the comments.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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4 minutes ago, 30368 said:

Flipping heck!

The buffers are sprung so if I fitted them and then painted the loco they probably would not be! On a point of detail, the loco is not for me but for my club built FOC. So I have to ensure I don't let my preferences (which is generally as I remember them, i.e. dirty locos or at best, dirty loco's cleaned and getting dirty again) predominate.

 

I prefer to use blackening fluid as I have for the mainframes. Thanks for the comments.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

Unless the buffer stocks are the same colour as the beam ? I would'nt even fit them until the bufferbeam is a painted Red, same applies to Coaches and Wagons where they are a different colour to the body.

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Posted (edited)

Lovely piece of masking, very prototype.

 

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Do agree that boiler bands as supplied are a bit clunky - I have tried plasticard in the past and that works fairly well. Will also try the waterslide transfers approach as suggested earlier although I have concerns about the robustness of these given my prediliction for dirtying up a loco and then cleaning it again leaving the traces of muck around the boiler bands.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, 30368 said:

I have concerns about the robustness of these given my prediliction for dirtying up a loco and then cleaning it again leaving the traces of muck around the boiler bands.

I have the same predilection and they'll be fine: remember you'll be putting topcoat over them, so they'll be sealed - weathering isn't going to shift them any more than it will shift the topcoat. 

 

But you need to double them up - this is what happens if you don't (they're probably scale, but they're invisible): 

 

20180510_213420.jpg

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Shiny buffer shanks came in with Oleos in the diesel era although the LNER Spencer-Moulton ones (on A4s) are an exception. All the sprung buffers I ever use (Gibson/Slater's/KM) work perfectly well after painting. I spray paint the whole footplate and buffer beam black and hand paint the red buffer beam afterwards - it's much easier to leave the black rim on most buffer housings if it's done in this order.

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Thanks both for the tips.

 

I like the look of the Q5 (?), you seem to have used some weathering powder and then some weathering wash on that creating a very authentic look. Even dirty loco's get oiled and it also gets spilled during oiling and inside motion throws oil up onto the underside of the boiler. Daddyman I take your point, double application of lining transfers required if boiler bands are to show.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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11 hours ago, 30368 said:

Thanks both for the tips.

 

I like the look of the Q5 (?), you seem to have used some weathering powder and then some weathering wash on that creating a very authentic look. Even dirty loco's get oiled and it also gets spilled during oiling and inside motion throws oil up onto the underside of the boiler. Daddyman I take your point, double application of lining transfers required if boiler bands are to show.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

No, it was all airbrush, with the finish distressed with various instruments. 

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1 hour ago, Daddyman said:

No, it was all airbrush, with the finish distressed with various instruments. 

 

Sounds very sinister! What were the various instruments? :girldevil:

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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Fibre-glass brush on the "soft" setting, cocktail sticks, make-up sponges, cotton-wool buds, etc. 

Best, 

David. 

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Posted (edited)

Many thanks David, I use weathering powders and washes. I use cotton buds and will try out some of your suggestions.

 

Have now painted loco on the basis that it has completed its Light Intermediate repair at Cowlairs in June 1953. So most of the attention would have been to the running gear and the engine with the boiler staying in situ. The underframe would have been re-painted but the body etc "touched up". I will then dirty it up a wee bit as if it has been running for a month or so. A few pictures before lining transfers applied.

 

I am very pleased with the chassis, it runs very sweetly.

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

Edited by 30368
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Now built High Level Gearbox. I used the Highflier utilising 45:1 ratio. Runs very well and is very silent given nylon gear train.

 

Chassis having final running - in.

 

 

 

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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With body partially painted and lined.

 

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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Loco 61784 almost finished and running well. I need to weather the body and a bit of touch up painting. It looks better than the photo's honest! Will start Ivatt tender next.

 

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

 

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Loco is now about finished and awaiting tender. We intend to use it as a track test loco on track laying on my 70D layout this weekend. It will add to its running in mileage before delivery to Bentley Model Railway Group.

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PS Wires sticking out the back are for tender pickups.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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And on to the tender. Unfortunately the instructions don't have any illustrations of the tank/bunker general assembly so if any one has a view of either prototype (unlikely!) or 7/4mm model of the tender interior I would be most greateful. I can work thorough it all from "first principles" but a picture or two would help!

 

My loco had the cut-away front to the tender and an extra handrail on the LH (Fireman's) side so etch modified as required.

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Closeup -

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Tender body bent to shape a soldered together. Note plunger pick-up added to trailing tender wheel.

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

PS Mr Edge, All soldering from the inside! So far!

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Good, keep on with that as far as you can, it saves a lot of time later. One thing to note though - make sure the solder comes through the joint all along - when soldering from the inside you should see a bright line of solder on the outside. If you don't it's sometimes necessary to scrape clean and re flux on the outside, still keeping the iron on the inside.

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Yes Mike, its a bit like welding - ensuring you have weld penetration on the other side of the joint.

Thanks for your help.

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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To continue the tender saga. Whilst the lack of any real assembly illustrations is a same the written instructions are fairly clear. I have also discovered a series of pictures showing the construction of, I think, a 7mm version of this version of the Ivatt GN tender, a great help.

 

Main components prior to assembly. I have added some rivet detail I think that Doncaster usualy used counter sunk rivets so I have filed off the top of the snap head to replicate CS that has "moved around a bit" and rusted around the head after all those years of service.

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Bunker side tanks soldered to the bulkhead.

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Kind regards,

 

Richard B

 

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Sorry, I've loads of photographs of the loco from the tender, but nothing to hand showing inside and details, though I do recall quite well how it does together if not need any info..

 

JB. 

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Many thanks JB - a combination of the the pictures of the 7mm version of the tender kit and common sense seems to have done the trick. I think I know where all the bits go!

 

Kind regards,

 

Richard B

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Richard,

 

A very enjoyable and educating description of building a rather challenging kit, than you for sharing with the community.

 

Cheers

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