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3 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

 

Quality costs, all the cheaper boards are cheaper for a reason, they really aren't any good for the job we want them for (baseboards)  

 

 

It also has to be one of the most unsuitable boards for a baseboard. It has no strength as 18mm needs a substantial 2" brace at 450mm maximum centres, it is also designed to be a fully bonded floor so all the T & G edges are glued giving a floor which is one single sheet. For baseboard joints it ideally needs to be machine cut as hand cutting creates a ragged edge.

 

 

Floorboards have no strength?  What planet are you on?

Cut off the edges of with a electric saw then?

Woodworm will attack any wood that's not treated. I hardly think that floorboards are not treated!  A 2 inch frame is not substantial. I constructed a 8 foot by 4 foot one in the 70's using standard chipboard on the top. Six legs on it. You could walk all over it. It had on top a coat of green gloss paint. It lasted donkey's years. In fact when we came to break it up it was a right job to do. 

 

Quality is often in disguise, looking for a fool, who think they are clever than other people, but it likes paying through the nose for things.

It seems that HS2 management also work in the model railway world too. Now that's a quality set up if there ever was one.  

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1 minute ago, Graham1960 said:

Floorboards have no strength?  What planet are you on?

 

The planet where I've been a carpenter for 41 years.   I can break apart chipboard flooring with my hands, it's designed to act as a large bonded sheet either as a floating floor where there is support under its entire area, or joisted.

 

3 minutes ago, Graham1960 said:

Woodworm will attack any wood that's not treated. I hardly think that floorboards are not treated

 

They're not. They are moisture resistant which means they will cope with some water damage but not immersion. They are not treated for woodworm or other insects.

 

5 minutes ago, Graham1960 said:

Quality is often in disguise, looking for a fool, who think they are clever than other people, but it likes paying through the nose for things.

It seems that HS2 management also work in the model railway world too. Now that's a quality set up if there ever was one.

 

I don't claim to be clever, but I certainly know a fool when I see one. :rolleyes:

 

Carry on with chipboard flooring for a baseboard, you can get 22mm if you want to waste a bit more money. 

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Use the 12mm plywood for the framing -  Look at Iain Rice's books on how he uses the framing to form L girder support.  It can't warp since you are using the straight edge of the frame to keep the baseboard flat.  

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1 hour ago, 4901 said:

Use the 12mm plywood for the framing -  Look at Iain Rice's books on how he uses the framing to form L girder support.  It can't warp since you are using the straight edge of the frame to keep the baseboard flat.  

 

Concur with this. I personally prefer to use 19mm for box frames or L girders with a tinner base, but that's just a personal preference. Either will work with a solid plywood or extruded polystyrene base.

 

As a thought, for a small layout sitting on top of shelves it's worth looking at one of the modular construction methods like FREMO and adapting the dimensions to the space available.

 

Cheers

David

Edited by DavidB-AU
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OK Birch Plywood would be sensible if you want one or two 8' by 4' boards. But there must be a cheaper one if you need 5+ ? 

That's the point I am really trying to put across, but making a pigs ear out of it! :sorry_mini:

 

By the way did you see last week's Countryfile? Which was on about how much timber is being taken from none renewable sources, including the UK, which is not planting nowhere near enough trees to sustain demand!

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2 hours ago, Graham1960 said:

OK Birch Plywood would be sensible if you want one or two 8' by 4' boards. But there must be a cheaper one if you need 5+ ? 

That's the point I am really trying to put across, but making a pigs ear out of it! https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_sorry_mini.gif

 

By the way did you see last week's Countryfile? Which was on about how much timber is being taken from none renewable sources, including the UK, which is not planting nowhere near enough trees to sustain demand!

One of the reasons I spent time finding birch plywood that was not from Russia where the Siberian forest is being felled with no thought for the future.

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18 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

I can break apart chipboard flooring with my hands


The superhero that Marvel reluctantly passed over, ‘Chipboard Man’

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The late Bob Barlow was involved in a family furniture business for a few years and was of the opinion that certain brands of high quality chipboard were more than suitable for baseboards. These tended to be of quite a densely packed nature.  I can remember using various chipboards in the 1970s & 80s which were of this type. 

 

Modern chipboards are not a patch on the older stuff. They are far too open and weak. 

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1 hour ago, PMP said:


The superhero that Marvel reluctantly passed over, ‘Chipboard Man’

 

I work with "Chemical toilet man' he can kill the chemicals in the Turdis with one visit, his power is unbelievable ....:bo_mini:

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On 25/10/2019 at 15:17, bart2day said:

 I found a company that sells 9mm Birch Plywood cut to size at £31 per square metre. Is that a good material/price?

 

 

 

That looks a bit pricey- the timber merchant I used (Fulham Timber) sell 2440x1220 (3 square metres) sheets of 9mm birch ply for £50. They will cut it for a price based on the number of cuts you want.

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Use whatever wood you can get your hands on and free was my motto! I dismantled on old wardrobe and used the sides and doors, topped with the 3mm hardboard back to match the height of the spare loft boards i used.  I also found some old ply pieces taken off of some pallets and some spare MDF. All fixed to 2" x 2", and 2" x 1" softwood frame around the room.

 

6 years later and everything is absolutely fine with the layout. It doesn't move anywhere and will be destroyed if I have to move house, but I can live with that. 

 

MDF and Chipboard are a nightmare to fix track pins into, but no other issues as far as I could tell.However, In my opinion, ply is the best material.

 

Photo's were taken when I first built the layout and starting laying track. Looks a bit different now!

 

 

 

1791634907_KingsLynnandWestNorfolk-20130715-00341.jpg.fcd7f4508517c4b5b644e7506c902163.jpg2099481577_KingsLynnandWestNorfolk-20130715-00339.jpg.8de80a0d782be28a2b3665aef688a63c.jpg

 

20190923_070441_resized.jpg.4d90b4c5f7b577a8d210bb10d6934680.jpg

 

20190923_070656_resized.jpg.012d5793ed7b53ecc6f1e48038803cb3.jpg

Edited by ianLMS
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Another vote for reclaimed timber. I used new 2X1 from B&Q and Wickes for my bedroom layout 25-30 years ago and some of it warped horribly.  The next one used 100% reclaimed timber much of it from vans from my local scrapyard and the ones which were straight stayed straight. Just avoid vans with organic matter in and check carefully for woodworm. Builders vans are generally best.     Spend your money on a circular saw and or saw bench with circular saw that way you save hours of exercise with a hand saw and having one arm noticeably more muscular than the other.

Edit.  Chipboard is horrible stuff, my loft is floored with it and it has sagged in one place where it got wet. The ragged edges can cut you open and leave splinters.  No way will I use it, not even the Melamine plastic coated stuff.

Edited by DavidCBroad

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12 hours ago, ianLMS said:

Use whatever wood you can get your hands on and free was my motto! I dismantled on old wardrobe and used the sides and doors, topped with the 3mm hardboard back to match the height of the spare loft boards i used.  I also found some old ply pieces taken off of some pallets and some spare MDF. All fixed to 2" x 2", and 2" x 1" softwood frame around the room.

 

6 years later and everything is absolutely fine with the layout. It doesn't move anywhere and will be destroyed if I have to move house, but I can live with that. 

 

MDF and Chipboard are a nightmare to fix track pins into, but no other issues as far as I could tell.However, In my opinion, ply is the best material.

 

Photo's were taken when I first built the layout and starting laying track. Looks a bit different now!

 

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/1791634907_KingsLynnandWestNorfolk-20130715-00341.jpg.fcd7f4508517c4b5b644e7506c902163.jpghttps://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/2099481577_KingsLynnandWestNorfolk-20130715-00339.jpg.8de80a0d782be28a2b3665aef688a63c.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/20190923_070441_resized.jpg.4d90b4c5f7b577a8d210bb10d6934680.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/20190923_070656_resized.jpg.012d5793ed7b53ecc6f1e48038803cb3.jpg

 

Thanks for the advice. That looks like an awesome layout.

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On 28/10/2019 at 20:32, 2mmMark said:

The late Bob Barlow was involved in a family furniture business for a few years and was of the opinion that certain brands of high quality chipboard were more than suitable for baseboards. These tended to be of quite a densely packed nature.  I can remember using various chipboards in the 1970s & 80s which were of this type. 

 

Modern chipboards are not a patch on the older stuff. They are far too open and weak. 

That's what I remember about the old chipboards from the 70's. I'm certain you could get a green paint that was used to coat the board that gave it a good protective surface to work on. All you can get these days is water based rubbish, which is more expensive and can't even be used outside. Mind you that was in the days when there was a local small woodshop/DIY store on the local shopping district. And there would about five of these establishments in a five mile radius! They were cheap as chips too. Not like the B&Q places that have replaced them. They would cut a piece of timber to size for you too. The look these days if you say to a modern DIY superstore "can you cut this piece down so I can get it on the bus!"

   

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1 hour ago, Graham1960 said:

That's what I remember about the old chipboards from the 70's. I'm certain you could get a green paint that was used to coat the board that gave it a good protective surface to work on. All you can get these days is water based rubbish, which is more expensive and can't even be used outside. Mind you that was in the days when there was a local small woodshop/DIY store on the local shopping district. And there would about five of these establishments in a five mile radius! They were cheap as chips too. Not like the B&Q places that have replaced them. They would cut a piece of timber to size for you too. The look these days if you say to a modern DIY superstore "can you cut this piece down so I can get it on the bus!"

   

 

Spirit-based paints and primers are still easily available.

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On 25/10/2019 at 15:17, bart2day said:

Thanks for all your replies. Looks like Plywood is the best option then. I would be buying it pre cut. I found a company that sells 9mm Birch Plywood cut to size at £31 per square metre. Is that a good material/price?

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_10/F0C36DAF-8D2A-4EB4-856F-9B8CB7CFB517.jpeg.1ba5163bebeea1675e7ed6652bde036d.jpeg

Very expensive.  £45 for an 8x4 sheet (2.88sq m) is about the correct price for 6mm genuine birch plywood. For that price expect it cut to size.

Iam a long term Wickes customer but usually get ply from B&Q because of their cutting service.

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