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Stupid questions

 

Cement mixer trucks - do they rotate clockwise or anti-clockwise? Or either? Or both? Or who cares?

 

Paul

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A bigger question for me is, does anyone make one in OO gauge?  :huh:

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6 hours ago, chris p bacon said:

Clockwise while mixing/travelling, anti clockwise to unload.

 

Wow! So it wasn't such a stupid question after all! Who knew?

 

Many thanks.

 

Just one more (genuinely stupid) - do I assume that's clockwise or anti-clockwise when looking at it from behind?

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2 hours ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

 

Wow! So it wasn't such a stupid question after all! Who knew?

 

Many thanks.

 

Just one more (genuinely stupid) - do I assume that's clockwise or anti-clockwise when looking at it from behind?

 

I forgot to say, that's looking from behind which is where I'm usually standing. :D

 

There are blades within the drum like an Archimedes screw, for mixing it pushes the load towards the front and turns it over. To empty, they reverse the drum and it brings it to the top and down the chute.

 

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Another daft question. Why are they called cement mixers when they are usually for mixing concrete (aggregates, sand, cement and water)? Wouldn't concrete mixer be better?

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21 minutes ago, grahame said:

Another daft question. Why are they called cement mixers when they are usually for mixing concrete (aggregates, sand, cement and water)? Wouldn't concrete mixer be better?

Both terms are used.

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23 minutes ago, Fat Controller said:

Both terms are used.

 

But which is correct?

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Just now, grahame said:

 

But which is correct?

'Cement mixer' was originally the term used for the small mixers, made by people like 'Winget', used to supply 'compo' for brick-layers on site. Lorry-mounted 'concrete' mixers appeared from the late-1950s/ early 1960s, as more use was made of concrete for floor slabs and similar. They wouldn't be much use delivering 'compo', unless you had a lot of very fast brickies, as the large quantities of cement would start to 'go off' before being used. 

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Concrete contains cement anyway. I seem to recall Richard Dockerill referring to them as 'conkies'.

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17 hours ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

Stupid questions

 

Cement mixer trucks - do they rotate clockwise or anti-clockwise? Or either? Or both? Or who cares?

 

Paul

I think you need to ask what would happen if they stopped rotating:banghead:

 

John P

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3 hours ago, BernardTPM said:

Concrete contains cement anyway. I seem to recall Richard Dockerill referring to them as 'conkies'.

 

And, of course, he was known as 'concrete Dick'.

 

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17 hours ago, YesTor said:

A bigger question for me is, does anyone make one in OO gauge?  https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/emoticons/default_huh.png

Yes, I bought one which is a Japanese model (Best choose?) On eBay. It had an obviously Japanese cab based on a Hino prototype so I replaced it with a Road Transport Images Leyland cab from the late 1970s. It is available for sale if of interest.

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Duplicate post 

Edited by 37114
Duplicate post

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On 05/11/2019 at 20:39, 37114 said:

Yes, I bought one which is a Japanese model (Best choose?) On eBay. It had an obviously Japanese cab based on a Hino prototype so I replaced it with a Road Transport Images Leyland cab from the late 1970s.

 Hino are [or were] sold in the UK for tippers, etc.....I think they were based in Ireland? [Importer?] 

So, as a make, not too far out of the way?

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3 hours ago, alastairq said:

 Hino are [or were] sold in the UK for tippers, etc.....I think they were based in Ireland? [Importer?] 

So, as a make, not too far out of the way?

Yes they were very popular in Ireland which is where the importer was, they were rugged trucks but cabs rusted out quite quickly. One has just been imported to the UK, some interesting read in the comments:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/48893530617/in/photostream/

 

Should anyone be interested my 4mm cement/concrete mixer model is on ebay now as I am up sizing to 7mm:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/174090190876

 

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Your mixer is painted in Pioneer Concrete colours, an Aussie firm taken over by Hansons. Hansons still had some Hino mixers until 2015/16. there was certainly one running out of Cannock plant.

 

Paul.

Edited by GRUNFOS
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On 05/11/2019 at 13:06, grahame said:

Another daft question. Why are they called cement mixers when they are usually for mixing concrete (aggregates, sand, cement and water)? Wouldn't concrete mixer be better?

 I used to work for a large builders merchant that also  had  ready mix concrete plants and then became part of the RMC group and we usually referred to them as truck mixers.

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This one got a bit too involved in being part of the railway scenery - Oxshott 13th October 2010

It actually bounced off the roof of the train after falling off the bridge - Mixer driver was unfortunate (IMHO) but thankfully survived.

DSC00401.JPG.dee782f8189a08fcb508f91df6ee0ce0.JPG

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