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Kylestrome’s 2mm Workbench – Disassembling Farish Coaches

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David,

 

From your experience so far, have you found a preferable chuck rpm when taking these light cuts?

 

Edited by Bryn

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6 hours ago, Bryn said:

David,

 

From your experience so far, have you found a preferable chuck rpm when taking these light cuts?

 

 

Bryn,

 

I didn't actually note the exact RPM, but I would say 'medium fast' because we're dealing with quite soft material. The emphasis should be on taking very, very light cuts (not more than 0,1mm) with freshly sharpened tools.

 

David

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I did some with a single belt on my Unimat SL on the middle step of each pulley.  Nominally 1600 RPM but it fluctuates with load. TBH I wouldn't get too hung up about speed as long as the thing is cutting nicely without undue noises,  chatter,  smoke etc. 

 

Just start with some wheels where you have a big surplus to practice  on, in my case Farish coach wheels. 

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When I was a kid I used to exasperate my parents by reducing new toys to their component parts, “to see how they work”, and then reassembling them. These days I have specialist tools …

 

PB090042.jpg.cdbe26c34075de900468e84d2d1b6d26.jpg

 

PB090040.jpg.d12f5b6558a09ac12ee79135a7548588.jpg

In case you ever wondered how Graham Farish Mk1 coaches go together, this photo should give you some clues. The body is clipped onto the underframe at both ends and in the middle. This is where an artist’s pallet knife comes in useful, being thinner than any screwdriver, to spring the bodysides outwards without damaging them.

 

In the process of fitting new couplings, I will be discarding the self-centering spring-loaded mounts. A shame really, because some highly dextrous Chinese worker must have had a hard time getting those fine wires in place!

 

David

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Hi David,

 

I am looking to disassemble a Farish Stanier coach - have you done one of these?  Do they come apart in the same way as MK1s?

 

Many thanks

 

Paddy

 

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1 hour ago, Paddy said:

I am looking to disassemble a Farish Stanier coach - have you done one of these?  Do they come apart in the same way as MK1s?

 

I don't have any Stanier coaches, but I would be surprised if they're not similar in construction.

 

David

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I find the hardest part of dismantling Farish Mk.1s is getting the glazing out in one piece, especially if the assembler has been a bit over enthusiastic with the glue! 

 

Some of glazing strips in the dozen or so I've repainted so far have more or less been welded to the side. Occasionally though you hit it lucky and get one that appears to have missed the glue line altogether. 

 

Tom.  

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Keep those springs - someone will lose theirs and be grateful for them.

 

I did once ask Farish for a replacement for one that shot across the room never to be seen again. A good while later a letter arrived with one spring taped to it.

 

Glue-wise some of my windows seem to have a hard time staying put... even though I haven't tried to take them out.

 

Regards, Andy

 

 

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Thanks everyone.  I might look at an easier option such as Dapol B Set or older Farish coaches.

 

Paddy

 

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