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PaulG

Hornby LNER N2 0-6-2T

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Colchester had an allocation of three N2/2 0-6-2T in the 1950s: 69550 (9/52-3/53), 69555 (9/52-10/56) and 69558 (9/52-8/56). All three were from the batch built by Beyer, Peacock & Co. without condensing gear.

 

Has Hornby produced such a model or are they all N2/1 or N2/4 version with condensing pipes and trip cocks? If so, is it just a "simple" matter of removing the pipes and are there any other "visual" aspects to address?

 

Any help much appreciated.

 

Paul

Edited by PaulG

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It's a classic 'one size fits all' body tooling based on a standard BR(ER) GN section condensing N2/2; originally an Airfix GMR tooling that first went on sale as a Mainline product in the later 1970s. Happily fully gets the general character of the subject. There's a lot that can be done to make them better portraits of the non condensing class loco. Condensing gear comes off obviously enough, and the tank vent pipes ahead of the cab, and many - possibly most - had a taller chimney and dome cover, also GER allocated N2s may have had Westinghouse air brake gear, refer to pictures if possible for the loco in your time period. No trip cock to remove, the model never had this detail, but more conspicuously the injectors are not represented either. The bendy smoke box door handrail needs replacement, and the lack of lamp irons can use some effort.

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2 hours ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

It's a classic 'one size fits all' body tooling based on a standard BR(ER) GN section condensing N2/2; originally an Airfix GMR tooling that first went on sale as a Mainline product in the later 1970s. Happily fully gets the general character of the subject. There's a lot that can be done to make them better portraits of the non condensing class loco. Condensing gear comes off obviously enough, and the tank vent pipes ahead of the cab, and many - possibly most - had a taller chimney and dome cover, also GER allocated N2s may have had Westinghouse air brake gear, refer to pictures if possible for the loco in your time period. No trip cock to remove, the model never had this detail, but more conspicuously the injectors are not represented either. The bendy smoke box door handrail needs replacement, and the lack of lamp irons can use some effort.

Thank you for the comments.

 

I note there is a discrepancy between Yeadon's and the RCTS Green book.  Depending which reference you use, 69555 may have retained the subsequently fitted condensing gear. I have a photo of 69550 and 69558 and they clearly do not have condensing gear. However, there is a poor quality photo of an unidentified N2 in BR days at Colchester St Botolph's clearly with condensing gear. So far I have unable to find a photo of 69555, which perhaps did retain the gear.

 

Paul

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N2 is crying out for a retool to modern standards with the appropriate variations within tooling suite.

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A part of the trip cock gear is depicted on the Hornby model, i.e. the pipework attached to the front step on the right hand side.  It's quite easy to carve off, though.

 

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13 hours ago, G-BOAF said:

N2 is crying out for a retool to modern standards with the appropriate variations within tooling suite.

That would be welcome; but I would take a pre WWI design GNR tender loco over it any day of the week, J6 or K2 for preference. This because we simply don't have a RTR general purpose tender loco with the distinctively different looking GNR cab and tender, nice though the C1 atlantic is...

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13 hours ago, G-BOAF said:

N2 is crying out for a retool to modern standards with the appropriate variations within tooling suite.

 

And an N1!

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Here is my take on a non-condensing version from the Hornby model... A how-to appeared in an issue of MRJ by Alan Sibley?? from the Mainline model many years ago! This involved a scale chassis and re-motoring, and was before the advent of the improved chassis Hornby model.

SAM_0280.JPG.1e1eabd387a0bae7632e32bd0a0a4c82.JPG

SAM_0284.JPG.d6547a73dbb54578c0dd28cc7f1cced8.JPG

Cheers from Oz,

Peter C.

Edited by 45568
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1 hour ago, SquireBev said:

 

And an N1!

I mean not really a variation of the N2 is it?!

The N2 is a much more numerous class and typified Kings Cross subruban working, as well as having a popular member in preservation.

I know the N7 was more numerous, but also less geographically diverse, and as such I am surprised that has become a mainstream modern spec model before the N2

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2 hours ago, G-BOAF said:

I mean not really a variation of the N2 is it?!

The N2 is a much more numerous class and typified Kings Cross subruban working, as well as having a popular member in preservation.

I know the N7 was more numerous, but also less geographically diverse, and as such I am surprised that has become a mainstream modern spec model before the N2

 

Not a variation, no, but possibly similar enough to share a chassis at least?

Edited by SquireBev

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If a manufacturer were kind enough to visit a new N2 upon us, we would have to make with the swift lobbying for a motor position low enough to fit inside the N1, as the wheelbase and external mechanism layout in model form equally suits that class, from which the N2 was directly developed

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2 hours ago, G-BOAF said:

I mean not really a variation of the N2 is it?!

The N2 is a much more numerous class and typified Kings Cross subruban working, as well as having a popular member in preservation.

I know the N7 was more numerous, but also less geographically diverse, and as such I am surprised that has become a mainstream modern spec model before the N2

 

I had been waiting for the N7 to be RTR modeled since 1956. But Hornby Dublo already had one even then, and others since.

 

So no sympathy from me ;)

 

Tim

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23 hours ago, 34theletterbetweenB&D said:

It's a classic 'one size fits all' body tooling based on a standard BR(ER) GN section condensing N2/2; originally an Airfix GMR tooling that first went on sale as a Mainline product in the later 1970s. Happily fully gets the general character of the subject. There's a lot that can be done to make them better portraits of the non condensing class loco. Condensing gear comes off obviously enough, and the tank vent pipes ahead of the cab, and many - possibly most - had a taller chimney and dome cover, also GER allocated N2s may have had Westinghouse air brake gear, refer to pictures if possible for the loco in your time period. No trip cock to remove, the model never had this detail, but more conspicuously the injectors are not represented either. The bendy smoke box door handrail needs replacement, and the lack of lamp irons can use some effort.

 

1982 I think.

 

http://www.airfixrailways.co.uk/N2.htm

 

http://www.mainlinerailways.org.uk/Catalogue 1982.htm

 

 

 

Jason

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Re diversity of the N7 I read that in their latter years after replacement by DMUs, a number were shopped out all over the former LNER with a couple going to Lincoln.

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15 hours ago, Theakerr said:

Re diversity of the N7 I read that in their latter years after replacement by DMUs, a number were shopped out all over the former LNER with a couple going to Lincoln.

Anybody using N2s in condensing form for the KX suburban operation, should have N7s from almost the start of the LNER period, to the end of steam. A six coupled tank engine lighter than the N2 was required for the Hatfield branches, and as result Hatfield shed (BR's 34C) had a regular allocation of N7s, and they would go 'main line' to KX.

 

As for dispersal of 0-6-2T as steam ran down, there was an interesting interloper among the 0-6-2T at Hatfield: N5 69266 spent about three months of summer 1959 there, for a full set of GCR, GER and GNR design 0-6-2T's  in one location. I have a (chance acquisition of a) good colour picture of it shunting on the Hertford branch adjacent Dawnays steel yard, which I cannot publish as the photographic copyright holder is unknown.

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Interestingly enough the Hornby-Dublo 2-rail model was numbered 69550, and had no condensing gear. The HD model was remarkably good by the standards of the time when introduced (1938), and was clearly an N2, although it appeared in other guises — including a "Swindonised" version masquerading as a 56xx!

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