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Strip block connectors - where do I get them?

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Hi there, 

 

So I am looking to find a block strip connector that can be plugged and unplugged, to assemble and disassemble a layout for shows. I need this so wire between the baseboards. 

 

This will be on a DCC layout so will be required to handle some amps. 

 

So far I have found this; 

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/DCC-Concepts-DCC-STRIP-Terminal-Pluggable/dp/B072QLJKYY/ref=sr_1_3?crid=3BHT9F5CE6KUQ&keywords=pluggable+terminal+strip&qid=1575641988&sprefix=plugable+terminal+%2Caps%2C149&sr=8-3

 

But I am unwilling to pay so much considering I would need eight of them! 

 

Many thanks, 

 

Nick. 

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My first port of call would normally be Farnell or RS 

 

Search for pluggable terminal blocks. 

 

You might not find an identical thing, but there might be something more cost effective. 

 

 

Edit: I'm not trying hard enough - Teaky did find something identical at Farnell.

Edited by sharris
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Thanks very much for the replies, still in shock how much they cost! Literally the cheapest bits of plastic and the smallest amount of metal in them :'(

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Suggest not going that way, but look at other connectors.   Having to do up dozens of contact screws when assembling a layout doesn't strike me as sensible. 

 

Suggestion 1 - the better quality solid pin D-type connectors (as opposed to the cheaper pressed/rolled pins) - just about adequate for DCC loadings at 5A.  They seem fine on Burntisland which is a big layout, 5A system, and a lot of connections between boards.   Advantage is a lot of connection pins for different things other than DCC power.

 

Suggestion 2 - XLR connectors.  In 3 and 4 pin types they are fairly cheap.  Larger pin counts and the price can shoot up.   I think the last load I bought were from Farnell/CPC (can't remember which half of Farnell was cheaper, do check! ).    

 

 

 

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Plugging and unplugging one of these 12-way connectors can be quite difficult. I bought a couple to use as smaller units (eg sliced into 2-, 3- and 4-way) and they're quite tight to unplug just in these small units, let alone a full 12-way. 

 

I would suggest considering Nigel's suggestions above. 

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26 minutes ago, Nigelcliffe said:

Suggest not going that way, but look at other connectors.   Having to do up dozens of contact screws when assembling a layout doesn't strike me as sensible. 

 

You only do up the screws once, when the layout is built. After that they are pluggable. That's why they are more expensive.

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1 hour ago, Nigelcliffe said:

Suggest not going that way, but look at other connectors.   Having to do up dozens of contact screws when assembling a layout doesn't strike me as sensible. 

 

Suggestion 1 - the better quality solid pin D-type connectors (as opposed to the cheaper pressed/rolled pins) - just about adequate for DCC loadings at 5A.  They seem fine on Burntisland which is a big layout, 5A system, and a lot of connections between boards.   Advantage is a lot of connection pins for different things other than DCC power.

 

Suggestion 2 - XLR connectors.  In 3 and 4 pin types they are fairly cheap.  Larger pin counts and the price can shoot up.   I think the last load I bought were from Farnell/CPC (can't remember which half of Farnell was cheaper, do check! ).    

 

 

 

I quite like the idea of the D type plugs, more research is required by me then!

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I will be selling some very soon - how many do you need?

 

Send me a PM and we can talk it over.

Edited by TEAMYAKIMA

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So now all you have to do is buy the plugs and solder them up or buy male to male cables.

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What ever I see on a western site ,like Amazon and various ,for sale I always check ebay for its real cost ie what it costs from China .Never disappointed .

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EBay is still more expensive than a Chinese platform such as AliExpress - much better for components (and often faster delivery)

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I have found that a 12 terminal long strip will plug together easily but is a right bar-steward to get apart, so I chop them into more manageable lumps to suit the things being connected across boards or panels., e.g. track or accessory buses, point motors, other gubbins, etc.

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Many years ago I connected two connector blocks by inserting long split pins though one connector, tightening the screws and inserting the protruding pin into the top screws of the second block. Wires are connected by attaching to the split pin on one side and screwing the other wire into the second block. 

You could use nails instead and solder to the head.

Edited by grriff
Added nails

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Those pluggable terminal blocks are not reliable enough for exhibition use. 

 

In the past we used the 'D' type computer connectors and the pluggable terminal blocks on various layouts and they were all eventually replaced due to poor connections.

 

On most of our layouts we use 24 or 36 way automotive connectors with gold plated crimped connectors from RS. These have now become prohibitively expensive (2-3 pounds per pin) so for our newest layout, Mauch Chunk which was at Warley this year, we used Mate-N-Lok automotive connectors (12 way) for all power and control circuits around the layout.

 

This link: https://www.autoelectricsupplies.co.uk/product/39 shows the type we used (although I have no knowlege of the supplier).

 

You would need a decent ratchet crimping tool but ,fitted properly, you know they will be 100% reliable and with with decent stranded wire for the inter-board link, they can easily handle the full 5A current output from our Lenz command stations.

 

They might seem expensive but they will pay for themselves in the time you won't be spending under your baseboards at exhibitions.

 

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