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Lovely idea! Challenge accepted...

 

GWR road fleet number 2020 was a Thornycroft A1 4 or 5 ton lorry introduced in Nov 1929.

 

It probably looked something like this:

32872216147_4bd8c8a89e_b.jpg

 

but it would have had a UW or GC number plate.

 

The only credit I can take for this is for remembering where to look it up! Atkins, "GWR Goods Cartage - Vol 2"

 

Don't Panic!

 

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2020.jpg.bf5fe26f44a76c48f205607b7af16e49.jpg

 

2020, Plymouth. Date unknown, probably just before or just after WWI. Has been fitted with large diameter buffer heads.

 

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2020 was the last of the 1901 (850) class of small tank engines built at Wolverhampton. built May 1895,  Pannier tanks October 1923, withdrawn December 1938 and sold Jan 1939 to Amalgamated Anthracite Colliieries Ammanford, then Trimsaran in 1950 at which point it was under NCB ownership. Nothing later than that in RCTS and haven't been able to find late photos or what eventually happened, but Trimsaran closed mid 50s.
Looks as if she has the H section spokes in the above photo.

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Tender 2020 was part of Lot A96, built 1916 and allocated to locomotive lot 206, which includes the GWS' 5322. The tender currently on 5322 is 1994, and as close as any that survive.

IMGP0730.JPG

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Very frustrating that the photo of loco 2020 is in front of a poster announcing the launch of a new Sunday paper, which ought to allow exact dating, but can I find any reference to the paper on the web? Nope!

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39 minutes ago, Nearholmer said:

Very frustrating that the photo of loco 2020 is in front of a poster announcing the launch of a new Sunday paper, which ought to allow exact dating, but can I find any reference to the paper on the web? Nope!

 

I found this:

http://paintedsignsandmosaics.blogspot.com/2011/06/sunday-illustrated-gillette-and-iron.html

 

It appears to be about July 1921.

 

Edited by Coppercap
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Posted (edited)

The poster states that the first issue would be on sale July 3rd* which was indeed a Sunday in 1921. There appears to be some dodgy dealing involved  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horatio_Bottomley

 

* I thought at first sight it was a '5', but, on closer investigation, it's a '3'.

 

Since this is my first post of 2020,   Happy New Year Everybody! 

Edited by Il Grifone
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15 hours ago, Penrhos1920 said:

Tender 2020 went to France in 1917 behind loco 7322.

 *Seven* Three Two Two ??

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59 minutes ago, JimC said:

 *Seven* Three Two Two ??

Was that one of the ones that had a weight added to the front buffer beam to add stability on the Devon banks?

Will

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5 hours ago, JimC said:

 *Seven* Three Two Two ??

That’s the number given in the article in Pannier that I got that information from.  But 5322 is the correct number as 7322 wasn’t built until 1932 and 5322 was brand new in 1917.

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25 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

So what was wagon No. 2020?

 

It was impossible to find in the time I was prepared to spend looking!

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17 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

So what was wagon No. 2020?

 

Also sheet No. 2020...

 Sheet 2020 was a tarpaulin............

 

Hope that rolls that one up.  Promise it's not a cover-up.

 

 

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20 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

So what was wagon No. 2020?

 

Unfortunately the lowest number wagon in Atkins et al is G15 no.5878

 

But opens diagram O21 were numbered in the range 2000 to 9999.

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2 hours ago, Penrhos1920 said:

But opens diagram O21 were numbered in the range 2000 to 9999.

 

My understanding of O21 is that these were 19th century 4-plank wagons upgraded with double-sided brakes in the 1920s. Over 24,000 of the original wagons were built 1887-1902, mostly taking new numbers. Were wagons converted to O21 renumbered?

 

2 hours ago, Penrhos1920 said:

Unfortunately the lowest number wagon in Atkins et al is G15 no.5878

 

 

My notes from Atkins 3rd edition list quite a few numbers below that, e.g. 3,400 of those 4-plank wagons had numbers in the range 2 - 10853. I'd have to borrow the book again to see what actual numbers are listed. However, as I discovered (thanks to you, @Penrhos1920) re. 19th century wood minks, Atkins can be far from complete.

Edited by Compound2632

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

Were wagons converted to O21 renumbered?

 

I don't think so.

 

 

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Wagon 2020 would be something 19th century and probably pre-diagram book. Open of <4 planks would be the favourite for me, though it could just as easily be a roof less cattle wagon or brake van.

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Statistically by far the .ost likely is the open because there were so many more of them.

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