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A new modelling chapter: Marsh Lane Workshops

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Henkel make the ersin multi core (rosin) solder wire in a range of sizes, both lead free - green reel- and 60/40 - red reel, under the Loctite brand. I have only ever really used this type of solder along with simple phosphoric acid flux ( home brew around 15-20%). This solder is a good all-rounder I have found for all general type of work, used without the flux for electrical stuff, ( the water based flux can complete electrical paths), and with for metalwork, brass, N/S etc. Point to note is lead free has a higher melting temp, doesn’t like 60/40 and vice-versa, so don’t mix on iron tips.

 

For pcb track don’t leave the iron too long on the copper pcb, excess heat can cause the layer to lift from the base. Although using the versaline etched chair plates makes for a longer job, they not only raise the rail to the right height for mating to easitrac if desired, but make good heat sinks to help prevent this. Making your own track brings great satisfaction I find, and does get easier, and sometimes quicker, but not always.

 

Izzy

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Glad you started this Rich I will be following your trials and tribulations with interest, good luck with the journey

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On 09/01/2020 at 17:47, jollysmart said:

Glad you started this Rich I will be following your trials and tribulations with interest, good luck with the journey

 

Thanks for that.  Hope you enjoy the journey.  I've always enjoyed model railways, but this latest foray into 2FS, with the support and encouragement of the local area group, really has spurred me on to do something, and do it well, to the best of my ability (which might not be saying much!!).

 

 

There has been no progress the past few days because of work and day-to-day life, as well as the latest 'North Mercia' group meeting last Thursday.  A bit of Templot work on the track layout for the hidden sidings was achieved at the latest meeting.  They are slightly complicated by the need for some to be changeover sidings, so that loaded or empty wagons enter the scene, and empty or loaded wagons respectively leave, but I think I am making progress. I need to do some testing on gradients to see what works and what doesnt.  All this was done, in between drinking tea, discussing the merits of various topics and admiring the progress with Laurie's own Yeovil Town layout!  The sight of the baseboard with raised trackbed ready for track laying has spurred me onwards though.  So assuming the next point to be produced works well and I get the electrics set up on it, hopefully I may be able to start work on the first couple of baseboards (although storing them is a totally different issue). I promised myself back in April last year, I was going to get to grips with the trackwork and know that I was happy with it before any wood was cut.  

 

In related news, the temperature controlled soldering iron has been dug out of its hiding place, the replacement solder (suggest earlier on this thread) has arrived, and the Association 'vee' jig has been paid for, and I am just awaiting its handover from our friendly postman.  So maybe on my day off next week, Point No. 3 may begin construction.  We had some friendly discussion at last Thursday's meeting about the best way to build such things, whether to start from the longest straight running rail, or as I tend to do, start from the 'vee'.  We concluded it was a personal preference decision, but I'll try and do some pictures for the next point, in the hope that people may be able to advise if I am going wrong, or could do things better.

 

Finally of this update, I had a PM during the week from a fellow 'rmWebber' and I have accidentally managed to delete it - so apologies to whomever it was!  I recall it came about from something he'd read on here, so if your reading this again, could you get in touch!!  I remember one part of the query was on how the points will be operated?  They will need to be electrically worked in someway, shape or form.  While I have been keeping several options in mind, I am coming round to the thinking that operation by servos is the best way, which themselves will be controlled by MERG boards.  I've looked at Megapoints for a few months and had a couple of conversations with Dave, but given that I am now staying DC on the new layout, and that MERG CBUS boards will handle other aspects, it seems to make sense to connect them into the CBUS network. Well that is my current thought anyway.

 

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I came across this video this morning which is very instructive on the basic principles.

Obviously it's from a US presenter and the tools & materials are not whay I would choose for 2mm but the basic principles are well explained.

 

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Just a quick update, to show that things are still moving .. the filing and assembly jigs arrived from the 2mm Association sales shop this morning, so hopefully Thursday will be the start of Test Point No. 4 production.  If that all works out ok, then it will be wired up electronically on my small 3' x 1' demonstration board here and we'll see what happens!

 

IMG_0572.jpg.4be3e506c5b394c5ee2add798e768167.jpg IMG_0574.jpg.65cd4330bc5e8b3573f58c47b8a21258.jpg

 

The jigs look well produced and I can see how they help, especially with making the filing of the point blades and 'v' a lot easier.  Hopefully I'll report back in a couple of days on how things went!

 

Thanks to those who are following this thread, hopefully some more interesting images this week!

 

Rich

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Managed to get a couple of hours today, with the intention of building another point. My (stupid) PC laptop had other ideas however and spent 96 minutes doing a bl**dy Microsoft update!  So I resorted instead to trying out the filing jig and also the assembly jig.

 

The filing jig, having watched the 2mm Association video that was kindly posted earlier on the thread, really does make things very simple.  I made two 'vee' items this afternoon, the first was filed and assembled the filing jig.  Question for those knowledgable guys - go you put the rails in the assembly side of this jig upside down or right way up, or doesn't it matter?  I am assuming the straight rail (rather than the diagonal one) would always be the straight ahead/direct route through the point?

 

IMG_0582.jpg.557a89516a46c7f7fa65d98665fa8d2b.jpg

 

That looks to be quite good to my eye (am I deceiving myself?) the two rails are offset, and despite the cruelness of the photograph, the soldering was reasonable as well - this was the first thing done on this new temperature controlled iron, which is fantastic - why did I leave it in the box for 18 months!  Having taken that 'vee' I then tried to place it in the assembly jig, but it wouldn't slot in easily (read not at all) so decided that there were obviously some slight differences between the two.

 

So having filed down another two pieces of rail, I assembled and soldered the second one actually in the assembly jig

 

IMG_0583.jpg.ff3f069671e984a688d19af1e1d8f3e2.jpg

 

That to me does not look quite as good and I think the branch rail (left hand in this picture) is set too far back. Also, as I expected, the aluminium jig acted as a huge heatsink.  So when I get to building the next point, I'll go back to the original way of producing the point straight onto the template (having also calibrated the printer for Templot) but using the filing jib to file and assemble the vee.

 

As ever, I welcome comments.

 

Rich

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Hi Rich,

 

I am afraid I can offer no insight into the use of the 2mm jigs having never used them, but if you haven't already got it then I would suggest that the excellent 2mm publication 'Track' might be of help here. This book, which Geoff Jones put so much time and effort into along with contributions by many others, is I feel of great use to anyone making their own track whatever the scale involved and the method of construction.

 

Chapter 5 covers making Vees using a variety of methods along with advice on how to position the splice rail relative to the point rail. It also deals with filing and bending the rail ends to allow for the rail web which doesn't seem to feature in the video. (I do it slightly differently by bending the rail first and then filing flat, but it does really need doing however it is achieved). It might be with any of these aspects where the issues you are discovering could arise.

 

Izzy

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2 hours ago, Izzy said:

Hi Rich,

 

I am afraid I can offer no insight into the use of the 2mm jigs having never used them, but if you haven't already got it then I would suggest that the excellent 2mm publication 'Track' might be of help here. This book, which Geoff Jones put so much time and effort into along with contributions by many others, is I feel of great use to anyone making their own track whatever the scale involved and the method of construction.

 

Chapter 5 covers making Vees using a variety of methods along with advice on how to position the splice rail relative to the point rail. It also deals with filing and bending the rail ends to allow for the rail web which doesn't seem to feature in the video. (I do it slightly differently by bending the rail first and then filing flat, but it does really need doing however it is achieved). It might be with any of these aspects where the issues you are discovering could arise.

 

Izzy

 

Thanks Izzy,

When I next put an order into the 2mm track shop, I'll make sure I add that book on - strangely I've got the others, just not that one!  Thinking about thing overnight I think I've worked out how to bend the first 5mm of the rail and then put it in the filing jib to deal with the rail web issue.  I did try bending one and filing it on a work bench yesterday, but I just ended up with a very bent rail!  There's no way I can come up with to hold the rail firm except for in the jig.  It could well be me over thinking things tho, as I am convinced its not difficult.

 

Should get a few bits and pieces out the way this afternoon, then I'm going to put point No. 3 into build this evening, with any luck, the aim being to try and perfect the issues from No. 2, and tackle the above with the bending of the vee.  @Brossard has kindly offered me some advice from an EM perspective which has also made a lot of sense, so without wishing to sound optimistic, im quietly hopeful for this one!! :) (Now, what did somebody say about famous last words???)

 

Rich

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I know many 2FS modellers seem to focus on the steam era (which is fine, and no disrespect intended) but after a lot of hard thinking, I've decided to go for a more modern image layout, based either mid-1970s or early 1980s (yet to totally decide).  So, in other non track news, some of you may have seen I'd posted (both on rmWeb and the N Gauge Forum) in the Wanted section, about seeking MGR hopper wagons.  Well thanks to a couple of people who responded, 25 Peco versions (at a very good price) turned up yesterday afternoon, along with a couple of early Bauxite liveried HEA wagons.  Some are weathered, others are not.

 

IMG_0586.jpg.9e5acd1d9e0bd2eb1b84c58d0c6665fc.jpg

 

So a big re-wheeling exercise needs to be done.  To anyone who has had wheels turned, from the perspective of running, is it better to go with the proper 2mm axles (my original plan) or if the current axles are sent off to the 2mm Association guy for turning, do they run ok?  Given the number involved, that my be a little cheaper! 

 

IMG_0587.jpg.35a2f469834794d0256328fd23b31742.jpg

 

Modelling wise, the HAAs will be modelling the loaded style, and with no disrespect to the previous owner, several have had plastic loads fitted, which to me look awful and very plastic.  So they will require changing to proper coal. Several of the HAAs are TOPS numbered with yellow framework, that needs repainting red as yellow is too late for the period, the remaining 15-18 are all pre-TOPS number as HOP-AB denoting air-braked hopper. Always remember seeing a shot on a B&R video that somebody at taken on cine of a WD arriving at Normanton in the 1960s, with a rake of these - first an only time I've seen a WD on air braked hopper wagons!  

 

I also really need a chat with Steve at @railtec-models about creating some TOPS and pre-Tops data panels for the HAA, so that each one is individually numbered. I don't think he currently does 2mm TOPS panels for HAAs.  Its not really necessary, but a nice finishing touch I think. So a bit of actual modelling to do coming upon this thread - just to show its not all trackwork! 

 

IMG_0588.jpg.9d433b145e9d638eada7b7b9363e6bae.jpg

 

The HEA wagons will need new wheel sets as they are currently plastic ones (urghh!).   All will need couplings changing to DG too, although with the HAAs as they will run in a fixed rake of 28-30 wagons, Im actually thinking of creating a fixed rake of five, with DGs on the outer ends, and short chain couplings on the inner ends, and inner vehicles so that there is still the take up of slack as a train sets off. If anyone as any suggestions on 2mm chain couplings, I'd welcome them. Really they should be instanters, but I doubt anyone (including me!) is going to notice the difference when they are running.

 

As a final note, also on the workbench to be done is another Farish 108 to be rewheeled, and then there are two Dapol Class 56s to be tackled.  These are bigger jobs, both are currently in Railfreight Coal, they need the body separating, the windows taking out, a soak in IPA to remove the livery, fitting of the correct early side grids which I've already purchased from @BernardTPM and changing the roof radiator flaps with 3D printed ones from Cav (of N Gauge Burton-on-Trent fame) who having produced them, sells them through his Shapeways shop.  Both then need to be repainted into BR blue as two of the early Romanian built examples - for which another purchase from Railtec is needed for the transfers!  

 

So all in all, plenty to come from me, just need to find the time!

 

Rich

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19 hours ago, MarshLane said:

.........  I am assuming the straight rail (rather than the diagonal one) would always be the straight ahead/direct route through the point?......

 

That to me does not look quite as good and I think the branch rail (left hand in this picture) is set too far back. Also, as I expected, the aluminium jig acted as a huge heatsink.  So when I get to building the next point, I'll go back to the original way of producing the point straight onto the template (having also calibrated the printer for Templot) but using the filing jib to file and assemble the vee.

Hi Rich,

 

On your first question, the point rail was generally the one on the main route, which might not always be on the straight route, (e.g. a loop coming off the outside of a curve). Of course on a curved turnout or a 'Y' there is no 'straight' route!

 

Secondly, like Izzy, I have no experience of the Association jigs (I made some of my own for filing the crossing rails and switches), but your second attempt looks the better one to me.  If you run your finger along the tapered edge of the point rail, you should be barely able to feel where the splice rail starts.  As I said earlier, the tip of the splice rail should be at, or just beyond, the end of the taper on the point rail.  You DO NOT want it to be nearer to the tip of the point rail as this will create a 'step' which will catch the wheel flanges.  Its tip needs to be sitting tightly against the point rail.

 

I have always built my track directly in situ straight on top of the Templot drawing.  I lay the two stock rails first and then position the tip of the point rail using two button gauges, after which I fix the splice rail in position again using a button gauge between its tip and the opposite stock rail and either a roller gauge between the other end and the stock rail or, more often, a short length of Easitrac sleepers slid onto both at that end.

 

If you have the Magazine back number file (another mine of information) look at my articles on P4 of the February 2012 and P71 of the August/September 2012 issues.

 

Jim

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I have always though that Peco used moulded plastic wheels as they are the only type I have ever encountered. The HEA's seem to have the standard Peco long wheelbase swing-link chassis so no surprise they are the standard plastic. The 2mm replacements are the 14.8mm length axles because that length also has a different coning angle to the 15.2's and some of the others, ( I think it's the same as the 12'25's but forget now). Do the HAA's have metal wheels? Didn't realise that.

 

As regards the Vees...

 

Just bend the first couple of mm's - to about 30 degrees,

 

 

1030444555_RMwebVees02.jpg.90ea6f6874371baf94f3c8976da49206.jpg

1106751953_RMwebVees01.jpg.39eae7beb1fbda8b4ea4ceb4d5d7ec8f.jpg

 

file flat with a standard needle file,

 

850753116_RMwebVees03.jpg.aa6339c75915af1fbd0037f33b66d3c5.jpg

 

1426572518_RMwebVees04.jpg.ad782414ac3042f922b880d7575ccc4d.jpg

 

Then turn over and file the angle to suit. Already there in some respects, just needs the head and foot removing and the correct angle being established. No idea what this was, just to quickly show the process. I use a knife shape needle file as a general rule for filing of Vees and blades.

 

670319477_RMwebVees05.jpg.d7319e7ad889f36eb959de95daa69b34.jpg

 

Now make a reverse hand one and the jobs done. Took me about 10 mins to do both. Most of this time spent trying to hold the **** i-phone to take the pretty awful pics (sorry about them). But you get the idea - I hope!

 

 

883882442_RMwebVees06.jpg.826c80ea65b081815eeb5fc256a78775.jpg

 

just needs a dab of flux and touch of an iron now...then a quick touch of a file to clean it all up.

 

Izzy

 

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1 hour ago, Izzy said:

I have always though that Peco used moulded plastic wheels as they are the only type I have ever encountered. The HEA's seem to have the standard Peco long wheelbase swing-link chassis so no surprise they are the standard plastic. The 2mm replacements are the 14.8mm length axles because that length also has a different coning angle to the 15.2's and some of the others, ( I think it's the same as the 12'25's but forget now). Do the HAA's have metal wheels? Didn't realise that.

 

As regards the Vees...

 

Just bend the first couple of mm's - to about 30 degrees,

 

Izzy

 

 

Izzy,

Thanks for that - I was about to order the 15.2mm versions, so you've saved me some head scratching there! 

 

IMG_0589.jpg.3a993974a2adadf0d7d7f3697ad6aa21.jpgIMG_0591.jpg.bf69b670e38bd05d488b87a42a1016d7.jpg

 

Yes the HAA are definitely metal tyres and axle, with a plastic insert I think.  Just looking at those pictures brings up another query - although I'll admit I have yet to Google this and look it up - but am I right in thinking there is some special resistance paint you can get to make wheels use a small amount of power (hence showing up on track circuits) or is it a case of soldering a small resister between the axles?  Anyone any ideas?

 

As for the ****************** vees :) Thanks for the iPhone pictures, and for taking the time to do them. That is probably the clearest set yet that I've seen on how to do. I totally see what your talking about now.  I tend to overthink and get things too involved, when really its far simpler than I'm making it. I think hit a brick wall until that penny drop moment.  Right, My aim to have another go tonight didn't really work out - but hopefully in the next couple of days!  Thanks again Izzy.

 

Rich

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35 minutes ago, MarshLane said:

 

Yes the HAA are definitely metal tyres and axle, with a plastic insert I think.  Just looking at those pictures brings up another query - although I'll admit I have yet to Google this and look it up - but am I right in thinking there is some special resistance paint you can get to make wheels use a small amount of power (hence showing up on track circuits) or is it a case of soldering a small resister between the axles?  Anyone any ideas?

Hi

 

You need a resistor otherwise you would get a direct short. I use 10k for mine.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

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15 minutes ago, MarshLane said:

 

Izzy,

Thanks for that - I was about to order the 15.2mm versions, so you've saved me some head scratching there! 

 

IMG_0589.jpg.3a993974a2adadf0d7d7f3697ad6aa21.jpgIMG_0591.jpg.bf69b670e38bd05d488b87a42a1016d7.jpg

 

Yes the HAA are definitely metal tyres and axle, with a plastic insert I think.  Just looking at those pictures brings up another query - although I'll admit I have yet to Google this and look it up - but am I right in thinking there is some special resistance paint you can get to make wheels use a small amount of power (hence showing up on track circuits) or is it a case of soldering a small resister between the axles?  Anyone any ideas?

 

As for the ****************** vees :) Thanks for the iPhone pictures, and for taking the time to do them. That is probably the clearest set yet that I've seen on how to do. I totally see what your talking about now.  I tend to overthink and get things too involved, when really its far simpler than I'm making it. I think hit a brick wall until that penny drop moment.  Right, My aim to have another go tonight didn't really work out - but hopefully in the next couple of days!  Thanks again Izzy.

 

Rich


Glad the Vee post was of help. 
 

re the HAA wheels. As these are different to the standard Peco ones the 14.8’s might not be what you need, if you decide to change them, (although they will be for the HEA’s).

 

 I am rather puzzled by these. They actually look just like the new type Bachmann ones, and especially with the long coned axles. As they are ‘pre-loved’ I am just wondering if the previous owner re-wheeled them with these. Although I have played around at thinning down these new Bachmann type I wouldn’t recommend it as a good way to go. Using proper 2mmSA ones is best I think here, but the big question is what the axle length needed should be. 

 

Do you have a vernier to measure them? It’s either that or getting a couple of axles of 15.2’s & 14.8’s and just seeing what fits/runs best. I doubt they would be the shorter ones, 14.2/13.8, but you can never tell. 

 

Izzy

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10 minutes ago, PaulCheffus said:

Hi

 

You need a resistor otherwise you would get a direct short. I use 10k for mine.

 

Cheers

 

Paul

 

Thanks Paul - do you just solder one end to the inside rim on one side, and the other to the same place on the other wheel set?

 

Rich

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10 minutes ago, Izzy said:


Glad the Vee post was of help. 
 

re the HAA wheels. As these are different to the standard Peco ones the 14.8’s might not be what you need, if you decide to change them, (although they will be for the HEA’s).

 

 I am rather puzzled by these. They actually look just like the new type Bachmann ones, and especially with the long coned axles. As they are ‘pre-loved’ I am just wondering if the previous owner re-wheeled them with these. Although I have played around at thinning down these new Bachmann type I wouldn’t recommend it as a good way to go. Using proper 2mmSA ones is best I think here, but the big question is what the axle length needed should be. 

 

Do you have a vernier to measure them? It’s either that or getting a couple of axles of 15.2’s & 14.8’s and just seeing what fits/runs best. I doubt they would be the shorter ones, 14.2/13.8, but you can never tell. 

 

Izzy

 

It could be that the chap did rewheel them - actually, I'll message him and ask!  Having got the digital calliper out on the last night, they were 6mm diameter, 15.2mm length.  The HEAs interestingly are the 14.8 versions.

 

Given your experience, I'll go for the proper 2mmSA wheel sets. After all, we're putting the time and effort in to the trackwork so it would be a shame to compromise on running quality for the sake of about 80p a wagon!

 

Rich

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7 minutes ago, MarshLane said:

 

Thanks Paul - do you just solder one end to the inside rim on one side, and the other to the same place on the other wheel set?

 

Rich

Hi

 

I used the silver paint that Maplin used to sell as soldering will probably destroy the wheel.

 

Something like this should do

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Conductive-Silver-Paint-Varnish-Electrically/dp/B00PSKQZ60/ref=asc_df_B00PSKQZ60/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=226613731662&hvpos=1o4&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12558650945185593193&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006892&hvtargid=pla-695143186948&psc=1

 

I glue the resistor to the wheel and paint from the rim to one end and paint from the axle to the other end of the resistor. Hopefully the picture should explain.

259534A2-2F5A-446A-8E23-1E646E931F6E.jpeg.d2c11e18fc98c537cdc04fc6f5b1a394.jpeg

Cheers

 

Paul

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11 hours ago, MarshLane said:

 

It could be that the chap did rewheel them - actually, I'll message him and ask!  Having got the digital calliper out on the last night, they were 6mm diameter, 15.2mm length.  The HEAs interestingly are the 14.8 versions.

 

 

Perhaps a mix of Bachmann and Parkside Dundas wheels? Parkside's plastic centred wheels were very popular for re-wheeling old Farish pizza cutters and PECO plastic wheels in N. I have a vague feeling I heard something about PECO intending to use them to replace their own in kits etc. when they bought out Parkside, but I don't think that has happened. I don't even know if they still sell them now?

 

The plastic that PECO use for their chassis seems to deform very easily, so if some have had longer than original axles forced in already, 14.8mm axles probably wouldn't run so well in them anymore.

 

The HEA you've got there looks like the Farish model, rather than the TPM body on PECO chassis, as they have better detailed brake levers etc.

 

Rather than chucking them away, the plastic "coal" inserts look like a nice base to apply real coal over the top of :)

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On 18/01/2020 at 19:47, Izzy said:

I have always though that Peco used moulded plastic wheels as they are the only type I have ever encountered. The HEA's seem to have the standard Peco long wheelbase swing-link chassis so no surprise they are the standard plastic. The 2mm replacements are the 14.8mm length axles because that length also has a different coning angle to the 15.2's and some of the others, ( I think it's the same as the 12'25's but forget now). Do the HAA's have metal wheels? Didn't realise that.

 

Izzy

 

Hi Izzy,

The chap that sold the HAAs to me tells me that he may have changed the wheel sets to get all running the same, but also that many were purchased from Hattons second hand, so could have been changed by a previous owner, so you may well be right that Peco do use moulded plastic wheels.  I think I'll go for the 15.2mm length axles, given thats what these measure at, and we'll see where we go.

 

Rich

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2 hours ago, MarshLane said:

 

Hi Izzy,

The chap that sold the HAAs to me tells me that he may have changed the wheel sets to get all running the same, but also that many were purchased from Hattons second hand, so could have been changed by a previous owner, so you may well be right that Peco do use moulded plastic wheels.  I think I'll go for the 15.2mm length axles, given thats what these measure at, and we'll see where we go.

 

Rich

 

 

Rich,

 

The PECO HAAs that I purchased new had 14.8 plastic wheels which I replaced with the equivalent 2mm Association wheel sets which seem to be OK running and fit wise.

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13 hours ago, MarshLane said:

 

Hi Izzy,

The chap that sold the HAAs to me tells me that he may have changed the wheel sets to get all running the same, but also that many were purchased from Hattons second hand, so could have been changed by a previous owner, so you may well be right that Peco do use moulded plastic wheels.  I think I'll go for the 15.2mm length axles, given thats what these measure at, and we'll see where we go.

 

Rich


Yes, if 15.2’s on 1.5mm dia axles have been fitted and used then no good trying to fit 14.8’s now, the former would seem to be what’s  needed.

 

Izzy

Edited by Izzy
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Rich,

Just an add on about the point work soldering, you might benefit with the solder flow under the rail by running a glass fibre brush over the sleepers where the rail sits and giving the rail a quick clean. Looking at the photos, not always a reliable indicator,  the  sleepers look slightly tarnished which they get just from handling, which will inhibit solder flow.

 

A small dab of flux of choice and in and out with the (hot) iron immediately the solder flows.

Edited by jollysmart
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Hi Rich, And there was me thinking that the switch to N / 2mm F/S would be simples, well how wrong can I be, it looks really interesting but fraught with things to trip you up along the way.

 

Good luck with the project mate.

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36 minutes ago, jollysmart said:

Rich,

Just an add on about the point work soldering, you might benefit with the solder flow under the rail by running a glass fibre brush over the sleepers where the rail sits and giving the rail a quick clean. Looking at the photos, not always a reliable indicator,  the  sleepers look slightly tarnished which they get just from handling, which will inhibit solder flow.

 

A small dab of flux of choice and in and out with the (hot) iron immediately the solder flows.

 

Thanks for that. I had noticed that I wasn't getting a 'pop' and the solder was not flowing like it did with the previous iron, so that could well be a factor.  I don't have a glass fibre brush - many people having said to say clear of them (horrid things I think was the expression!) but I'll try some very light sand paper just where the rail sits to rough it up a little.

 

 

28 minutes ago, Andrew P said:

Hi Rich, And there was me thinking that the switch to N / 2mm F/S would be simples, well how wrong can I be, it looks really interesting but fraught with things to trip you up along the way.

 

Good luck with the project mate.

 

Thanks Andy :)

Oh I don't think its particular complicated, just doesn't help when you have an idiot like me behind the soldering iron :P All fascinating stuff tho, and I'm enjoying the task - and the trackwork looks wonderful when complete, weathered and ballasted. I would highly recommend anyone in a similar position to seek out their local 2mm Area Group - Laurie and the North Mercia group have been incredibly welcoming and friendly, and it certainly helps to keep the mojo going and a positive incentive to get on.  I dont mind tripping up along the way, as long as I dont go flat on my face hehe! 


Rich

Edited by MarshLane
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2mm F/S seen at DEMU back in 2015

1720492499_BurtonDEMU2015May30th101.JPG.e29891aab6bdb2620498b6fcdf43e1ce.JPG

 

1336865439_BurtonDEMU2015May30th102.JPG.51fc8f706e27b04ff44826d6c4ba004a.JPG

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