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Ron Hull of Rotherham has commenced disposing of ex DB Cargo 60006 at Toton, the first of the class to meet its end...

60086 has also been sold to the firm with 60050 sold to Raxtar, also likely for scrap.  

Edit: WNXX reporting 60098 has been resold...

 

These photos are from Flickr, the photostream can be found here or by clicking on the pictures.

 

49413836458_99f9f72286_c.jpg60006

 

49414517652_893e2ae0d8_c.jpg60006

 

On a happier note, 60081 will survive with LSL. It will be cosmetically restored and eventually displayed at the Margate site.

Edited by Swifty11
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On WNXX today  - ‘Ron Hull also purchased 60086 (WQDA) at Toton but this one is understood to have been the subject of re-sale negotiations so may survive‘

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It kinda seems a shame, but nearly 30 years is longer than many of the original pilot scheme diesels managed, having fallen well short of their designed performance, and been discarded early. At least a 60 on song was a useful asset. 

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This DBs idea of an extra heavy general repair - reduce it down to components and put them back together but not necessarily in the same order or the same shape.

 

According to gen, this loco is to be used for transporting beans with it's next owner Heinz, Gillette having apparently turned DB down.

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It was a lovely warm day sometime in August 1989 when a friend and I did some cycling through Mickleover and came upon the still intact test track. Listening, we could hear something coming and after a while, 60 001 appeared looking so modern and sounding wonderful, quiet but clearly powerful.

 

Seeing the pictures above makes me feel much older and sadder than I was a few moments ago! 

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17 minutes ago, PenrithBeacon said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_Class_60

 

This article lacks an assessment of the strengths/weaknesses of the class. Would anybody oblige, please.

Cheers  

https://www.railmagazine.com/trains/current-trains/the-resurgent-60s

this article is from 2013 but a gives a good insight on the 60’s

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Overwhelmingly complicated electrical systems.... And specialist tooling required for any engine work... Particularly when changing cylinder heads. 

 

I did hear of some talk that the engine flywheel was prone to cracking, but im not sure how true that is, but it was given as an explanation as to why so many are sidelined. 

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6 minutes ago, pheaton said:

Overwhelmingly complicated electrical systems.... And specialist tooling required for any engine work... Particularly when changing cylinder heads. 

 

I did hear of some talk that the engine flywheel was prone to cracking, but im not sure how true that is, but it was given as an explanation as to why so many are sidelined. 

 

Did BMW build them ?

 

Brit15

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Neither of the sources quoted above makes much mention of the head-bolt issue. ISTR there was a facility set up at Whitemoor in the early days to replace these, as they were being popped at an alarming rate. As a non-engineer, I nevertheless see how 8 big cylinders might impose more strain than 16 smaller ones for the same displacement. There will always be a risk of trade-off if you simplify by reducing the number of components and make each work a little harder. 

 

The articles make it clear the prime-mover was a successful marine powerplant. Marine installations typically run at fixed rpm for extended periods. Locomotives do not offer such a steady operation, but vary the rev range considerably on every trip. I think the US diesel market had grappled with the same problem several decades before, when Fairbanks Morse prime movers, popular in marine installations, became locomotive engines. 

 

I think it was a Bank Holiday weekend when the crunch decision to accept the 60 fleet was required. Had BR declined to do so, certain company share prices would have fallen on the following Tuesday. You might imagine the decision would have been taken at BR Board Member level, but in fact it was left to the Project Director, a decent and highly experienced rolling stock man only a couple of grades higher than I was. Those who revere the BR era might pause to think of the strain imposed upon some employees in those days. 

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3 minutes ago, APOLLO said:

 

Did BMW build them ?

 

Brit15

No, because they would have been fitted with redundant parts like indicators if they had.

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A shame that 60050 is likely to get scrapped that was thornabys pet 60, not sure what name it was supposed to have but it got changed to roseberry topping a conical hill near Great ayton 

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Wasn't 60006 the one named for Scunny Works?

 

Strange it's the first to go, with the works still teetering.

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I think that the fundamental problem with Class 60 was the engine overhaul costs. Mirlees pulled a flanker on BRB/Brush with an irresistably low first-purchase bid. BRB was very prone to assessing offers solely on up-front cost rather than whole-life cost, and Class 60 was no exception. The inevitable consequence is that engine overhauls get deferred and deferred and eventually the laws of physics assert themselves and things start to go bang in a very big way.

 

Electrically, a very complex loco, one of the first truly micro-processor controlled locos. When it worked, happy days. When it didn't.....

 

The 60mph max speed must have been very limiting in terms of jobs they could do (I don't have data on this...and being fair, many bulks-load wagons are also 60mph).

 

Unbeatable tractive effort, as was demonstrated when I was part of the test train crew in Mickleover when Allegeheny1600 cycled past. As the trainee, my main job was to go to Tesco at lunch time for choc ices...

 

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On 20/01/2020 at 19:04, Swifty11 said:

 

On a happier note, 60081 will survive with LSL. It will be cosmetically restored and eventually displayed at the Margate site.

This was another one that went bang big time,  unless it gets a new engine and a load of other bits it wont be a runner..

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4 minutes ago, 37114 said:

This was another one that went bang big time,  unless it gets a new engine and a load of other bits it wont be a runner..

I would put it out of its misery, the thing is knackered, stripped and beyond repair.

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13 minutes ago, maico said:

In the meantime this German diesel loco had a service life of over 50 years 1962-2016

 

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=auto&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fde.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FHenschel_DH_4000

 

232_001_080573_cuh.jpg

Diesel Hydraulic, I notice. ;)

 

Makes you wonder just how long the WR Hydraulics could've kept going with decent support.

 

In 1989 my interest in UK trains was well on the wane; I recall someone asking when I was going to buy a new Lima Class 60? By that time I wouldn't even spit on a Lima (or Hornby) diesel, they were inferior in so many ways to US model locos, & 60s far too 'modern' for me anyway. Seeing them being scrapped makes me feel old, too!!! :rolleyes:

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52 minutes ago, 37114 said:

This was another one that went bang big time,  unless it gets a new engine and a load of other bits it wont be a runner..

 

It won't be a runner and it's extremely unlikely it ever will be again. It's only been saved to be an exhibit at Margate and it'll be a cosmetic restoration only, similar to that of parts donor 47841.

 

At least it will be saved, even though it'll be on a plinth.

 

Another shot from flickr shows it shortly after its 'leg out of bed' at Chester.

48700119603_7d0ec96aca_c.jpg60081 "Isambard Kingdom Brunel" 6L55 Chester failure 050403 by jim40135, on Flickr

Edited by Swifty11
Photo added.
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1 hour ago, russ p said:

A shame that 60050 is likely to get scrapped that was thornabys pet 60, not sure what name it was supposed to have but it got changed to roseberry topping a conical hill near Great ayton 

Roseberry Topping was the birth of the Teesside steel industry, being the early source of iron ore.

 

Or so I was told in Uni geology field trips to the area

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1 hour ago, F-UnitMad said:

Diesel Hydraulic, I notice. ;)

 

Makes you wonder just how long the WR Hydraulics could've kept going with decent support.

 

In 1989 my interest in UK trains was well on the wane; I recall someone asking when I was going to buy a new Lima Class 60? By that time I wouldn't even spit on a Lima (or Hornby) diesel, they were inferior in so many ways to US model locos, & 60s far too 'modern' for me anyway. Seeing them being scrapped makes me feel old, too!!! :rolleyes:

There was an interesting article in Traction a number of years ago which said basically the 56 order could have been halved if...they had kept a number of the air braked class 52s in service, which had superior starting tractive effort...

 

however In practice the license built transmissions and power units didn't live up to the quality that the Germans could manufacture the same items to.

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A snippet from a Rail Magazine article in reference to the super 60 programme 

 

In early 2009, then Chief Executive Keith Heller told RAIL 611 that all the locomotives would be stored, due to a 20% downturn in traffic. The lowest point came on December 7 2009, when only four ‘60s’ were left in service. 

However, they were never all stored - they were just too valuable to the business because of their haulage capabilities compared with the newer Class 66s. 

And behind the scenes, Heller was planning for the future of the big Type 5s. His successor Thauvette continued that planning process, appreciating the locomotives’ capabilities. DB recognised the asset it had on its hands, and set about ways of improving it. 

Rumours abounded that the ‘60s’ would be fitted with new engines, but that never occurred. Nevertheless, the core fleet in use was getting long in the tooth, and something needed to be done. 

It is also worth noting that no major works visit had been carried out on the Class 60s since their introduction. Just over a decade ago they had undergone major exams, but they had never visited a works facility for a complete rebuild (as other British Rail fleets had done). 

And so the ‘Super 60’ project was born.

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4 hours ago, Allegheny1600 said:

It was a lovely warm day sometime in August 1989 when a friend and I did some cycling through Mickleover and came upon the still intact test track. Listening, we could hear something coming and after a while, 60 001 appeared looking so modern and sounding wonderful, quiet but clearly powerful.

 

Seeing the pictures above makes me feel much older and sadder than I was a few moments ago! 

 

That is almost word for word what I was going to write except I was at Bamford station looking up some train times, for future jollies.

I wasn't really that much into modern trains anymore at the time, but this large quiet(ish) grey thing kinda got me interested in what was "out there now" all over again!

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Still quite impressive pulling away from Nottingham after a driver change, getting a long train of TEAs on the move again. There's often one about the time I get to work, once the loco is away the wagons slip almost silently past.

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It seems really strange to see something with a website address on its side getting scrapped !

 

its odd what you remember - I clearly recall when me and the wife brought our first brand new house having all my Lima 60s out in the kitchen ( including 2x 60081 in green ), must have been early 2001 when they were still in big demand.

 

Im sure EWS would have binned them all if they could, as nothing could match the 66 availability .

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