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What about.......

 

My approach would be.....

 

Weathering powders applied and sealed as per S.O.P then removed using car polish as per little 4mm hands using a cotton bud. Buffed according in a circular motion...

 

Nice sheen, gunk left around rivets, orifices and crevices. 

 

Rob. 

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I always look forward to seeing the result of your weathering. I'd go with an idea similar to Rob's, take some of the black off with t cut then weathering powders? 

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1 hour ago, sb67 said:

I always look forward to seeing the result of your weathering. I'd go with an idea similar to Rob's, take some of the black off with t cut then weathering powders? 

 

 

Ta. However, weathering powders stick better to matt surfaces. Deffo get them to stick and seal them first then apply polish. A bit like the real thing. Get dirty, then clean. 

 

Rob. 

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On 28/09/2020 at 13:46, Mick Bonwick said:

The absence of weathering output has prompted a return to a 'spraybooth on the layout' requirement. A few hours of pondering, and searching the shed for appropriate items, has produced a temporary construction that allows the playing of trains to continue and the weathering of them, too.

 

The result has increased the height of the painting turntable from floor level, but that has proved to be perfectly acceptable.

 

 

 

P1020495.JPG.4f08acf5f71425e68e4218119565af02.JPG

 

Of course, once that was in place, I had to check that everything was ready to proceed.

 

IMG_0589.JPG.1816455d62e5bd94fc12240ae03e567a.JPG

 

Some time ago I read an article by @Giles where he had used water soluble oil paint to make a locomotive look used but cared for. I bought some of that material and then kept it safe for a few years. An urge to work on another Peckett came over me, so I thought I would give his method a try. First attempt has not quite produced what I envisaged, but there's plenty of scope for change because it is taking a long time to dry.

 

This post is relevant to Modelling Real Locations because it is preventing me from doing it. :D

Would the residents needed to push this loco up the hill to Easton or could it simply be attached by rope to the Merchants tramway and a load of stone launched downhill?

 

You have mentioned rule 1!

 

Martyn

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  • RMweb Gold

If this Peckett ever runs on Easton it will have arrived behind something slightly larger, probably a G6. It would have been put to work at Sheepcroft to cope with the tremendous output required for the major construction works taking place for the development of the Weymouth harbour area.

 

The oil paint eventually hardened and the method of rubbing hard to work it into corners had produced rather a nice shine. Wanting to retain that shine or, at least some of it, the remaining work was done with a thinned MIG Dark Wash and MIG Black Smoke pigment. Small amounts of the wash were airbrushed on and then moved into corners with soft cotton buds, and small amounts of pigment were placed in areas where dirt would have buit up. The excess pigment was immediately blown away using the airflow from the airbrush. A wide flat (1/2") shader brush was used to drag this concoction downwards everywhere it was possible to so do.

 

The wash was used on the pipework and underframe, wheels and motion to produce an oily but not too grimy surface effect.

 

IMG_0646_Cropped.jpg.bcc0a9748524e8eff034e86dc5185def.jpg

 

IMG_0647_Cropped.jpg.5b99d91fdffb13962aff78dd42b4a5ef.jpg

 

IMG_0648_Cropped.jpg.b86e9ba3a5104ee079a22e4b6daca2c5.jpg

 

IMG_0649_Cropped.jpg.65cc4faabb3b47744da3bd378e61a2cb.jpg

 

Of course, if this engine worked in a Portland stone quarry there would have been a lot of pale coloured dust present . . . . . . .

 

 

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3 hours ago, Mick Bonwick said:

If this Peckett ever runs on Easton it will have arrived behind something slightly larger, probably a G6. It would have been put to work at Sheepcroft to cope with the tremendous output required for the major construction works taking place for the development of the Weymouth harbour area.

 

The oil paint eventually hardened and the method of rubbing hard to work it into corners had produced rather a nice shine. Wanting to retain that shine or, at least some of it, the remaining work was done with a thinned MIG Dark Wash and MIG Black Smoke pigment. Small amounts of the wash were airbrushed on and then moved into corners with soft cotton buds, and small amounts of pigment were placed in areas where dirt would have buit up. The excess pigment was immediately blown away using the airflow from the airbrush. A wide flat (1/2") shader brush was used to drag this concoction downwards everywhere it was possible to so do.

 

The wash was used on the pipework and underframe, wheels and motion to produce an oily but not too grimy surface effect.

 

IMG_0646_Cropped.jpg.bcc0a9748524e8eff034e86dc5185def.jpg

 

IMG_0647_Cropped.jpg.5b99d91fdffb13962aff78dd42b4a5ef.jpg

 

IMG_0648_Cropped.jpg.b86e9ba3a5104ee079a22e4b6daca2c5.jpg

 

IMG_0649_Cropped.jpg.65cc4faabb3b47744da3bd378e61a2cb.jpg

 

Of course, if this engine worked in a Portland stone quarry there would have been a lot of pale coloured dust present . . . . . . .

 

 

 

Nice Sheep reference there. 

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17 hours ago, NHY 581 said:

 

Nice Sheep reference there. 

 

And he hasn't even mentioned the options for adding a fictitious branch to Mutton Cove (Also a location on the Island) and the various quarries out on West Cliff. The westside quarries were actually served by the Merchants Railway and a spoil dump was fed by an additional narrow gauge line.

 

Edited by john new
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6 minutes ago, Gilbert said:

I expect Mick Bopeep will be along in a minute....

Looking a bit sheepish, no doubt?

 

I know, we have been here before, so let's hope he has some modelling for us! 

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6 minutes ago, Tallpaul69 said:

Any more lambatable comments, or updates on the Isle of Portlamb?

Portland Sheep - a rare breed originally from the Island.

 

In the genuine street names -

  • Shepherds Croft
  • West Wools
  • Woolcombe Rd 

and a former quarried area named - Shepherds Dinner

 

The above are genuine, but pushing it further we have another street name - Barley Croft aka Baarley Croft - coincidentally on the cliff top estate adjacent Mutton Cove.

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11 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

***** MODELLING ALERT *****

 

What do you think that this is for?

 

IMG_0735.JPG.617498d9836fa3f90f25d330ea974f6a.JPG

 

***** END OF MODELLING ALERT *****

 

Airbrushing grot onto coach rooves without mucking up the sides?

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