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  • RMweb Gold
46 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

***** MODELLING ALERT *****

 

What do you think that this is for?

 

IMG_0735.JPG.617498d9836fa3f90f25d330ea974f6a.JPG

 

***** END OF MODELLING ALERT *****

 

Weathering your letterbox ?

 

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That clever Mr Morton got it in one. I had 8 cars to weather in a similar fashion. When a coach needs to be done I don't usually mask the sides to do the roof, but take a bit of care over where the paint goes, simultaneously allowing a tiny bit of overspray to drift down the sides to represent a little bit of grime coming down from the roof. In this case, however, the sides of the cars needed to be very clean - it is the Golden Arrow.

 

I had some spare foam offcuts left over from my stock storage boxes, and noticed that they were almost the height of the roof edge from the ground. A couple or three pieces of 1mm greyboard were cut to shape and arranged so that the assembly could be dropped over the roof and allow me to airbrush downwards onto the roof without any overspray reaching the sides.

 

IMG_0739.JPG.156fc0fefd8d6fca82083ce9eeffdc06.JPG

 

What has this got to do with Easton?

 

I can use it for my green coaches and my crimson coaches and my olive coaches and my malachite coaches and. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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4 minutes ago, Tony Teague said:

Brilliant!

And, why didn't I think of that?

 

All answers on a post card please, best one will win a day out in the spray booth.

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18 hours ago, Mick Bonwick said:

***** MODELLING ALERT *****

 

What do you think that this is for?

 

IMG_0735.JPG.617498d9836fa3f90f25d330ea974f6a.JPG

 

***** END OF MODELLING ALERT *****

Morning All,

 

I assume it is nothing to do with sheep, as its a Modelling Alert?

I vote for Ian's suggestion?

So its sort of a "coach dip" (as opposed to a "sheep" dip)?.......

 

Keep smiling! 

Cheers

Paul

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  • RMweb Gold

About 4 years ago the workshops at Pendon Museum were augmented by one that was about 'Scratchbuilding structures from card'. Part of the preparation for this workshop involved the construction of some examples that could be used during the day to illustrate various stages of the process and what to do and not to do.

 

The idea was to take participants through the planning and preparation of a small weighbridge hut, based on one published in a Peco Productions book, and covering it with Scalescenes textures. Nick Wood (the tutor) and I spent a day at the Museum doing a dry run just to check what could be achieved in a day and decided that it was feasible.

 

We then prepared some samples, as mentioned above, that could be used:

 

IMG_2075.JPG.330faf0ba6aa5a10be84a5a30c6af949.JPG

 

IMG_2077.JPG.243fbb34a539addddbc1a979268f67dd.JPG

 

My original plans for Easton were to scratchbuild the structures, following the plans I had obtained for the station building and photographs for other buildings. While that is still a target, it may not be achievable in real life. I have recently been through the whole selection of Scalescenes offerings and made the decision to build some of their standard kits as an interim measure, to augment the resin buildings that were once accumulated for the same purpose (see page 1).

 

The main structures that will be required are:

 

Station

Signal Box

Engine Shed

Goods Shed

Terrace of Cottages

Footbridge (not railway connected)

Road Bridge (Reforne)

 

I plan to use the Random Ashlar texture wherever possible, because that most closely resembles what can be discerned in the photographs that I have. It is a bit dark in colour, though, as far as I can see.

 

 

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  • RMweb Gold

Probably teaching you to suck eggs Mick, but others may not be aware that there is a correct way up to have the Ashlar texture print. It is not immediately obvious but there is a shadow line under some stones and these should of course be at the bottom. 
 

Maybe you could try fiddling with the brightness / contrast settings on your printer to lighten the colour a bit

Edited by nickwood
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24 minutes ago, nickwood said:

Probably teaching you to suck eggs Mick, but others may not be aware that there is a correct way up to have the Ashlar texture print. It is not immediately obvious but there is a shadow line under some stones and these should of course be at the bottom. 
 

Maybe you could try fiddling with the brightness / contrast settings on your printer to lighten the colour a bit

 

Thanks, Nick. Your observation applies to all of the ashlar, stone and rubble textures.

 

My printer is a very cheap one, so the options that you suggest aren't apparent to me. Maybe there are some ways of doing it on the printer, but I think I'll ask Scalescenes if there is an easy way.

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11 minutes ago, Mick Bonwick said:

 

Thanks, Nick. Your observation applies to all of the ashlar, stone and rubble textures.

 

My printer is a very cheap one, so the options that you suggest aren't apparent to me. Maybe there are some ways of doing it on the printer, but I think I'll ask Scalescenes if there is an easy way.

If it was me I would try to edit the PDF in a graphics package before printing but I am not sure how editable the sheets are as supplied as I haven't tried.

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  • RMweb Gold

Different printers give different renditions of colour. Similarly different papers do too. Having an ink cartridge that is running out will also alter the colour balance - although that isn't very controllable. If all else fails a very light spray of dilute white/light grey from your airbrush might be the answer.

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If you are printing your own papers then a good quality inkjet printer using manufacturer inks is best as combatable ones I find can vary in tones.

Use a lightweight paper that is of photo quality, why lightweight as it is easier to bend around corners.

Glue, for small areas like the weighbridges you showed I would use Rocket card glue and a seam roller to smooth the lumps.

 

There are other papers but this is the one I have settled on.

 

IMG_2831.JPG.52181e39866d1514cca531713d36cf6e.JPG

 

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Thanks, Kevin.

 

The paper used for the illustrated hut construction was 120gsm, and the printer was a colour laser belonging to the Museum. My home printer is an inkjet and I use 120gsm paper for my own constructions. I have found that undiluted PVA applied with a brush has always served well, and gives a little time to adjust position if necessary. My experience of Roket card glue, good as it is, is that it doesn't give as much adjusment time as my modelling requires. :rolleyes:

 

I shall be experimenting with card and paper when I start building. I need to get the colouring right, first.

 

 

Edited by Mick Bonwick
Fingers again.
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1 minute ago, Mick Bonwick said:

Thanks, Kevin.

 

The paper used for the illustrated hut construction was 120gsm, and the printer was a colour laser belonging to the Museum. My home printer is an inkjet and I use 120gsm paper for my own constructions. I have found that undiluted PVA applied with a brush has always served well, and gives a little time to adjust position if necessary. My experience of Roket card glue, good as it is, ia that it doesn't give as much adjusment time as my modelling requires. :rolleyes:

 

I shall be experimenting with card and paper when I start building. I need to get the colouring right, first.

 

Take a dozen Scalescenes modellers and you'll get a dozen different glue & paper recommendations.  Those who get good results have usually experimented a bit with both glue and paper and found which works best for them. For instance, many will swear by glue sticks, I've tried many of the popular brands and have come to the conclusion that they are just not for me. Some print on self adhesive label paper, great but you only get one chance to postion it and it's expensive. I would use it for details like arches etc but not for large areas of wall. Personally I'm with Mick in the PVA and brush and good quality 120gsm paper camp, but each to their own.

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For large areas I also use PVA but for small areas like walls, detail panels, window reveals etc Rocket is great as it sets very quickly and gives a good solid grab early on of the paper.

Tried glue sticks, but no to lumpy for my liking.

The boot works was all Scalescenes paper with a mixture of PVA and Roket glue depending on size of area plus ease of access.

 

3.jpg.8fab57fd38b5f399aa9869b5b8d3b3e6.jpg

 

One thing I always use is a blunt needle in a pin vice to scribe the reverse side of the paper on a corner so you get a nice sharp bend (note-before glue applied of course otherwise you rip the paper!!!).

 

IMG_0719.JPG.5f117d7054b924ac2df69c3d3765a3a1.JPG

 

IMG_0721.JPG.d5c46aa94e4cbecba9ea9230bbb2f2ff.JPG

 

Hope this helps and I won't highjack your thread with any more pictures of buildings

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Kevin, sensible choices. The photo you've added using a small piece of mdf(?) to help sharpen the corner of the window opening or any other right angled fold is a technique that I also use. 

 

Mick knows all this stuff of course unless he was asleep in the Pendon Workshops we've done together :D

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16 minutes ago, KNP said:

For large areas I also use PVA but for small areas like walls, detail panels, window reveals etc Rocket is great as it sets very quickly and gives a good solid grab early on of the paper.

Tried glue sticks, but no to lumpy for my liking.

The boot works was all Scalescenes paper with a mixture of PVA and Roket glue depending on size of area plus ease of access.

One thing I always use is a blunt needle in a pin vice to scribe the reverse side of the paper on a corner so you get a nice sharp bend (note-before glue applied of course otherwise you rip the paper!!!).

Hope this helps and I won't highjack your thread with any more pictures of buildings

 

I'm not bothered about thread hijacks as long as they're relevant to the topic. It is always possible that an author can learn something from other folks' contributions. That has certainly been the case here!:good_mini:

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19 hours ago, john new said:

If it was me I would try to edit the PDF in a graphics package before printing but I am not sure how editable the sheets are as supplied as I haven't tried.

 

Thanks, John. That's exactly what Scalescenes themselves have suggested. Photoshop Elements 15 came with my PC, so I've tried using that and it works a treat.

 

Here are some results - the originals are the ones at the bottom of the shot:

 

P1020704.JPG.959ce1be89c43c95287b3f3e85dac603.JPG

 

Once the Golden Arrow has been completed I'll start on some buildings.

 

Maybe.

 

 

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I was talking to my friend Matthew earlier on, and the subject of cutting mats and gloss overspray came up. I wasn't sure if it really made a difference to the mat's properties if it had a shiny finish, so I asked him, "Do matt mats matter, Matt?"

 

:jester:

Edited by Mick Bonwick
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17 hours ago, Mick Bonwick said:

I was talking to my friend Matthew earlier on, and the subject of cutting mats and gloss overspray came up. I wasn't sure if it really made a difference to the mat's properties if it had a shiny finish, so I asked him, "Do matt mats matter, Matt?"

 

:jester:

 

Its a good job you don't suffer from a stammer.....

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