Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • RMweb Gold

As some of you will have read on other threads, I am going through a big life change and have taken on a pub near Hereford.

 

In it's previous life, the landlord encouraged families by renting bouncy castles and the like (does nothing for the grass).

 

I had already been considering an LGB style garden railway as an attraction. But then yesterday a contractor came in with a 8t excavator and cleared a large area of the garden that had been overrun by brambles. So I have begun to wonder about something a bit bigger in scale.

 

Do any of you have experience of a similar situation? What can we use that will be user friendly with small children (and inebriated adults).?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh...good luck with that.......Booze, kiddies and small trains are a health and safety nightmare. You may be better to get a local model club to get involved and allow them to run this as feature on your land.

 

The LT open day in Acton ( which is on soon) run a small train the length of the drive which people sit on (Gauge 1 electric and steam I think) this sounds more like what your describing and you could visit an ask them for advise.

 

https://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/open-weekends

 

BW

 

B  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a miniature railway (7 1/4" gauge) that ran on Wednesday nights at a pub near here. It was run by a couple of guys who were enthusiastic. Made for a great attraction. Bouncy castles were also there. The line just did a big circle past ponds and through a tunnel (the usual features). There was a Hymek and a steam engine.

 

The grub was also good.

 

Unfortunately there was a change of landlord, who wasn't interested in the railway - so it was removed.

 

I don't go to that pub anymore.

 

http://railthing.blogspot.com/2014/09/trains-at-pub.html

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd ask the same question as Guy. It would be possible to offer more useful advice with a bit more of an inkling as to what you're visualising. 

 

I suspect that the simplest and least legally complex would be your original idea of an LGB/G scale line, possibly incorporated in some sort of rockery type thing from which the public could be excluded without it being obvious that they're being excluded, as it were. LGB is, perhaps, a little hackneyed these days. For a bit more investment, perhaps Gauge 3 might be worth consideration. 

 

Personally, I've often thought that a scenic (as opposed to passenger carrying) 3.5"gauge line might be fun, but then you're getting well away from available r-t-r equipment, AFAIK. However, there is quite a bit of stuff available in 5" gauge that would be suitable, or adaptable, to scenic use. A small narrow gauge diesel with half a dozen hoppers circulating on an interestingly shaped loop would offer quite a bit of visual bang for the buck. Separating public and train would, of course, be vital at this size. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

Thanks for the input. When I take my lunchbreak, I will draw a siteplan.

 

It would be good to get a local club involved. I do have concerns about running anything unstaffed - even a simple loop of track.

 

And, for the same reason, perhaps not very sensible to go for a ride-on option. So perhaps start with a small LGB/Piko/ Bachmann project with potential to extend. I like the rockery idea as I have quite a lot of stone on site that needs to be moved.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, brenn said:

Gosh...good luck with that.......Booze, kiddies and small trains are a health and safety nightmare. You may be better to get a local model club to get involved and allow them to run this as feature on your land.

 

The LT open day in Acton ( which is on soon) run a small train the length of the drive which people sit on (Gauge 1 electric and steam I think) this sounds more like what your describing and you could visit an ask them for advise.

 

https://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/whats-on/open-weekends

 

BW

 

B  

Riding on Gauge one would be interesting! The Acton line is somewhat bigger at 7 1/4" gauge.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember if left unattended stuff WILL get nicked,  It always seams a fun joke when folk are drunk, even though they KNOW its all on camera :mocking_mini:

 

I would try for a combination of the above suggestions ?  Put in place  permanent dual gauge tracks (with rockery )

 

Invite volunteers to run your trains on a Saturday or bring their own trains to run , then once a month invite local or other clubs to come along for a weekend running session (all weather permitting of course)

   You could include live steam events and of course  nothing to stop you having a ride on train on these monthly events as well,  why not go the whole hog ? Put in an RC racing track through the rockery as well ? You could then have RC racing events on every OTHER weekend. A shallow pond for RC boats ?  Depends on just how much space you have to use :senile:  

 

Good luck with your new venture :good:

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you did go for a ride-on railway, this might be worth a look? (I don't know where your pub is, but this one is in Bedfordshire).

 

https://www.fancottrailway.co.uk/about/

 

Otherwise, 32mm or 45mm would be your best, and most robust bet. I would also suggest battery operated and/or live steam, so that you do not have to worry about good electrical connections. Vital if you are only going to run it periodically. Gauge 3 or similar, needs a lot more finesse, maintenance and fear of theft.....

  • Informative/Useful 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If the railway has to be supervised under operation anyway, then a ride on railway could be a good option. 5 inch gauge is the minimum suitable, and if you go for a narrow gauge style with four wheel locomotives you can go down to quite tight radius if you want a roundy roundy rather than an out and back.  

 

A simple battery loco like this could be operated by any staff member with very little training required and can negotiate 8 foot radius curves:

 

http://www.maxitrak.com/locomotive-item/5-inch-planet

 

Maxitrak is pretty much a one stop shop where you can buy all you need RTR or in kit form. (other manufacturers are available)

 

You would need public liability insurance which you may have anyway, plus documentation to prove all practicable steps for safety had been undertaken, but it would be less susceptible to vandalism or accidental damage than LGB...

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a few of the indoor play areas locally, usually themed to match the parent's attraction - the Bull Pen at Dairyland, the Jungle Barn at Paradise Park, etc.

 

I always dreamed of creating a train-themed one, so the climbing frames are in the shapes of locos and carriages/wagons  (Thomas, Percy, Toby, Annie & Clarabel, and Scruffy).

 

Could you create a railway-themed outdoor climbing frame as well?

 

No connections at all to this supplier: https://www.taylordesignandplay.com/outdoor-indoor-play-equipment/outdoor-play/

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Titan said:

If the railway has to be supervised under operation anyway, then a ride on railway could be a good option. 5 inch gauge is the minimum suitable, and if you go for a narrow gauge style with four wheel locomotives you can go down to quite tight radius if you want a roundy roundy rather than an out and back.  

 

A simple battery loco like this could be operated by any staff member with very little training required and can negotiate 8 foot radius curves:

 

http://www.maxitrak.com/locomotive-item/5-inch-planet

 

Maxitrak is pretty much a one stop shop where you can buy all you need RTR or in kit form. (other manufacturers are available)

 

You would need public liability insurance which you may have anyway, plus documentation to prove all practicable steps for safety had been undertaken, but it would be less susceptible to vandalism or accidental damage than LGB...

 

I really should not have made this suggestion.  Just popped out and measured and realised that I do just about have enough space for a 5 inch gauge railway with a loop in the front and back garden, and the railway running down the side of the house...

  • Funny 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Having children who are now growing out of the “small” stage, and nephews who are just progressing from baby to toddler, and having had a decade experience of trying to keep children happy while attempting to eat the odd summer pub lunch, a few thoughts:

 

- small children are incredibly kinetic. They really prefer to be running/climbing/exploring to standing looking at something. A garden railway (G/16mm) will engage them for a bit, but what they really want is to play with it!

 

- more detailed content increases kid appeal and mum appeal ...... model villages are more engaging than simple trains in a rockery;

 

- they love “play houses” (a play station?) with rooms, toy cookers, pots and pans etc.

 

- a “play train” works. There is one in a park near us, expensive-looking German-made job that is half way between large toy train and climbing frame, and they use that to create imaginative games/journeys;

 

- they will find everything possible way to injure themselves, so get something professionally designed and maintained to the highest possible standard.

 

- it’s exhausting going to the pub with a toddler!

 

- a tiny few parents are frankly neglectful of their kids in such an environment so you need to bargain for a few problems caused by that.

 

Running a pub has always looked like a demanding job to me, so I hope you find a way to do it that turns out to be good fun.

 

Edited by Nearholmer
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Denbridge said:

Riding on Gauge one would be interesting! The Acton line is somewhat bigger at 7 1/4" gauge.

Curly Lawrence (LBSC) used to do it in 0 gauge, to demonstrate the power of his designs, like Small Bass and Sir Morris de Cowley. Obviously he used an elevated track and straddle type trolley. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
7 minutes ago, Jongudmund said:

have you thought about using the trains to deliver drinks to people? I'd love that - order at the bar and have it brought to my "lineside table" on a little train.

 

Could be fun! I probably could run one end of the line into the building and along the rear bar fitting. Just need to ensure that it does not block access to the "cellar" (above ground) for the draymen.

 

TBH probably not an option. But, after the digger driver left on Tuesday, I found a concrete base that I had not known about. I am thinking of constructing a shed on this for outdoor food or ice creams. That really could have the railway running through it without any major issues.

 

More likely I will try a 45mm gauge line immediately behind the pub. And then perhaps, some time later a 5" gauge. In addition to the pub's own garden, the landowner also has a 2 acre field adjacent. So I could probably run into that so long as it does not interfere with the five camping pitches (the digger driver interfered with them by cutting through their power hook-ups!!!).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to pour a huge bucket of water on your plans.

 

A pub is a completely different kettle of fish to a private residence and there are visitors whom you would never invite into your home.

 

You could be constantly replacing items where they've been pulled up, vandalised or just vanished, not necessary by your loyal clientele, but the local scrotes and vandals that are endemic everywhere.

 

I once had 20 yards of Peco SM32 track stolen from the back garden of my army quarter. Since it was in a quite and secluded location, although the quarters were not inside the camp perimeter, and was not advertised or had appeared in the railway press, the police believed it was done 'to order' by someone who had visited, or more probably it had been mentioned  to someone else.

 

Moving up into the passenger hauling gauges, there is a big difference between your local garden railway and something that would have to be seen as a commercial operation because it is operating within the confines of your business.  Insurance and the  Health and Safety aspects  would need to be investigated fully.

 

If you have a 2 acre site behind with camping facilities then a 7.25" gauge line that is used practically to service waste and recycling bins might be an option ( Don't bother with 5" gauge for this, it's just too small.  A Swiss camping site I once visited did exactly that, and did offer the occasional ride as well.

 

If you do go ahead, then the very best of luck.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/02/2020 at 23:12, PatB said:

Curly Lawrence (LBSC) used to do it in 0 gauge, to demonstrate the power of his designs, like Small Bass and Sir Morris de Cowley. Obviously he used an elevated track and straddle type trolley. 

Yes he did, but hardly suitable for regular passenger hauling.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
24 minutes ago, Happy Hippo said:

I am going to pour a huge bucket of water on your plans.

 

A pub is a completely different kettle of fish to a private residence and there are visitors whom you would never invite into your home.

 

You could be constantly replacing items where they've been pulled up, vandalised or just vanished, not necessary by your loyal clientele, but the local scrotes and vandals that are endemic everywhere.

 

I once had 20 yards of Peco SM32 track stolen from the back garden of my army quarter. Since it was in a quite and secluded location, although the quarters were not inside the camp perimeter, and was not advertised or had appeared in the railway press, the police believed it was done 'to order' by someone who had visited, or more probably it had been mentioned  to someone else.

 

Moving up into the passenger hauling gauges, there is a big difference between your local garden railway and something that would have to be seen as a commercial operation because it is operating within the confines of your business.  Insurance and the  Health and Safety aspects  would need to be investigated fully.

 

If you have a 2 acre site behind with camping facilities then a 7.25" gauge line that is used practically to service waste and recycling bins might be an option ( Don't bother with 5" gauge for this, it's just too small.  A Swiss camping site I once visited did exactly that, and did offer the occasional ride as well.

 

If you do go ahead, then the very best of luck.

 

 

 

I am not naïve about the potential problems of theft/vandalism. But if it brings in enough extra custom, it could still be worthwhile.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I did survey my homestead with an outdoor line in mind.  None of it is on the flat, which could have resulted in dashing from deep cuttings onto tall viaducts.  Of course, thanks to Storm Ciara I realise that any such plans would have been a miniature Tay Bridge Disaster waiting to happen. 

 

But, I think this is a great idea.  I'd love to sit in, or outside, a pub and what little trains dash past; I think it will appeal to children of all ages.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold
55 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

I did survey my homestead with an outdoor line in mind.  None of it is on the flat, which could have resulted in dashing from deep cuttings onto tall viaducts.  Of course, thanks to Storm Ciara I realise that any such plans would have been a miniature Tay Bridge Disaster waiting to happen. 

 

But, I think this is a great idea.  I'd love to sit in, or outside, a pub and what little trains dash past; I think it will appeal to children of all ages.    

 

A garden railway can be so much more interesting if the garden is not on the flat. But less suitable for the general public. We don't want toddlers falling into cuttings.

 

My land is rather flat so if G scale is the option (at least for now), I will construct a raised bed/rockery about 2ft high for it to run along in "dog bone" form with a loop at the station on the single track section.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

It used to be quite common for G Scale to be used overhead in stores and sometimes pubs and restaurants. The suggestion about opening “your” track to local enthusiast and clubs is a good one, as it brings customers, you never know your pub could become a must meet at site on weekends for garden railway enthusiasts. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.