Jump to content

The non-railway and non-modelling social zone. Please ensure forum rules are adhered to in this area too!

PhilJ W

Exotic place names in the UK

Recommended Posts

On another thread a discussion ensued about exotic sounding places in the UK. An example is there are one or two places called California.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is a suburb of Nuneaton called 'Bermuda'.  Probably about as far removed from the real Bermuda as it's possible to get!

 

My paternal grandfather used to work at a colliery there, when Warwickshire had coal mines.

Edited by 4630
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And as posted on that other thread in Ayrshire we have Moscow, bit the residents there tell you it is pronounced "cow" as per the animal.

 

Jim

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't that how Americans pronounce it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've often thought that Ravenglass sounds like a place in a fantasy novel.

  • Agree 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in Wales there are many villages that were given Anglicised Biblical names, such as Bethlehem, Nazareth and even Sodom.  In fact Bethlehem in Carmarthenshire is a rare example of a small village post office having to re-open after closure due to the thousands of people wanting to post their Christmas cards there to get a Bethlehem post mark.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Cow should be pronounced 'Coo' and be embarrassed, according to George Stephenson, and I agree with him.

 

A particularly grim council estate in Briton Ferry was called Fairyland.  Not so much exotic as having a certain scan to them are Scethrog, a village near Brecon, and Scwrfa, near Tredegar; both sound like infectious diseases.  Devon and Cornwall have several, Indian Queens, Cullompton, and Longwoodwidger come to mind.  Oi be a long wood widger, 'an oi do widger all the live long day in the long wood, shades of Rambling Sid Rompo, nurdle up your artifacts and loosen your cordwangle.  Sometimes oi do be a 'avin of a beer with one of they medium length wood widgers, but oi don' never be 'avin no truck with they short wood widgers.  B'ain't natrul, trubble come of et...

 

Best of these is IMHO, Fochrhiw, between Merthyr and Rhymney, a bleak excrescence even on a good day and Siberian in winter, presumably only there to make the residents of those places feel a little better about themselves...

 

Ormskirk.

 

Oswaldtwistle.

 

There are also place names which, while having no other attribute, seem specifically designed to be pronounced in the local accent; I give you Barnsley, trooble at 't mill, lad, and Droitwich, ow do, dooks.

And, posh accent perfect for it, Pangbourne, don't y'know, what, Carruthers.  Take that plum out of your mouth, chinless!

 

Pennsylvania is just outside Bath, and also a part of the Llanederyn Estate in Cardiff.

 

Corntown, just outside Bridgend, sounds as if it should be in the American mid-west.

Edited by The Johnster
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not an entire village, but I was taken enough by a street name in St Ives, Cornwall to waste a 35mm slide on the street sign in the days when pictures cost good money: Salubrious Place.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have various worldly locations in the rural parts of Hampshire - Canada, Palestine and Egypt, plus some towns with derived names; Enham Alamein and Waterlooville.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't remember if I've said it before, but....

 

Penarth; a town fairly close to Cardiff, as pronounced in a typical BBC accent.

 

Pennorth; same place, same location, with pretentious overtones. 

 

Pennarff; same place, same location, but a lot more realistic..... 

  • Like 1
  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New York in Lincolnshire.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Welly said:

New York in Lincolnshire.

On the road to Boston from where I live in Soloby.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got a Jericho near us here in Angus.  No walls, but there again you wouldn't expect there to be....

 

DT

  • Funny 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PhilJ W said:

On another thread a discussion ensued about exotic sounding places in the UK. An example is there are one or two places called California.

I lived in California, Ipswich.....don't let them upstarts from Stowmarket try and tell their California is the real one.

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, The Johnster said:

 

Ormskirk.

 

Oswaldtwistle.

 

 

 

Both names left over from the Danes and Norse. You also have places like Fazakerley, no way is that a typical British name.

 

 

 

Jason

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a hamlet called Egypt near Burnham Beeches

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Clive Mortimore said:

I lived in California, Ipswich.....don't let them upstarts from Stowmarket try and tell their California is the real one.

The real one was in Stoke, where Kerr-Stuart had their works.

In Ayrshire, there is a village called Patna, whilst Co. Durham has Philidelphia and Washington.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oliver's Battery (Hampshire)

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chapel-en-le-Frith conjures up images of the French Riviera more than the Peak District. Ashby-de-la-Zouch sounds like it half belongs in France too (leaving the Ashby foot firmly in England though).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.