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Peco small radius points - modifying for DCC


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  • RMweb Gold

Ive decided im going to modify my points and add frog switching for maximum reliability. The medium and large radius points have an exposed rail and stock rail on the underside where they can be bonded together. The small radius are different - see pic.

 

Do I need to cut away the plastic sleepers and if so where would you recommend doing it?

20200313_210339.jpg

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  • RMweb Gold
42 minutes ago, Butler Henderson said:

Suggest solder the necessary wires to the outside of the rail where needed rather than potentially weakening the framework of the point.

I would not worry about that. After all the medium and large radius turnouts come with the webbing already cut for you.

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I found point clips to be a pestilential nuisance.  If they don't get gunged up and fail to work, they weaken and fail to make contact or they move and cause a derailment.  Either leave them alone or "bond and snip"!

 

Harold.

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Is it possible to put to bed the "modification for DCC" title?

 

It is a modification for better switching reliability - regardless of DCC or DC/analog.

 

Cheers,

MIck

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21 hours ago, RFS said:

I would not worry about that. After all the medium and large radius turnouts come with the webbing already cut for you.

 

If in doubt, stagger the sleeper cuts from one side of the point to the other.

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1 hour ago, hobbyhorse said:

Very simple mods, with very reliable running.

Simon

IMG_2704.JPG.200ab11ce8482d0537f63c764b5e4eca.JPG

 

I would go a stage further with those connections. Instead of just bonding the rails together, why not connect them directly to the bus? It doesn't seem any more difficult to me.

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1 hour ago, Pete the Elaner said:

I would go a stage further with those connections. Instead of just bonding the rails together, why not connect them directly to the bus? It doesn't seem any more difficult to me.

 

Ans also put a small dab of epoxy resin adhesive in the gap.

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2 hours ago, Pete the Elaner said:

I would go a stage further with those connections. Instead of just bonding the rails together, why not connect them directly to the bus? It doesn't seem any more difficult to me.

Cuts down on the amount of wires to the bus. Although at times it sometimes gets out of hand with two wires to each section of rail.IMG_0837_2.jpeg.51e46f91e795ccd8d5de7af68ab6ebf8.jpeg

 

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  • 1 month later...
On 17/03/2020 at 07:15, hobbyhorse said:

Very simple mods, with very reliable running.

Simon

IMG_2704.JPG.200ab11ce8482d0537f63c764b5e4eca.JPGIMG_2703.JPG.ee02d6cf63bb24a520862a3863eebdfb.JPGIMG_2705.JPG.74e9155195af0601a0e3d8d927a9ced8.JPG

 

 

Sorry first ever post on this forum so please accept my gratitude for all I've learnt over the years.

 

I've been confused by electrofrog points for years but just when I thought I understood them, and knew what to do with frog polarity etc, I came across this posting which has baffled me again.

 

It looks like you have connected the stock rails directly to your power feeds (picture 3), then connected the stock rails to the outer rails (picture 1), then cut the stock rails to prevent shorting (picture 2). Correct?

 

If so then doesn't this mean there is no power going to the frog at all?

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Welcome to posting.

 

The frog does have a separately feed via the point motor.

The reason why the switch blade have a power feed is it's only relies on two bent down tabs to transfer the power.

The outside rails also have power feed, it's very much belt and braces but over the years this system has worked faultlessly.

 

Simon

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44 minutes ago, Red Baron said:

All of this makes me wonder when we will shift over to the loco's being re-chargeable with the power source internal to the chassis.  Dare I say it - just like the real thing?

 

A battery RC model railway system is available now, but they use bulky batteries which do not last very long.

This makes it far more practical easier to provide power via rails/wires. Dare I say it - just like the real thing? 

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1 minute ago, Pete the Elaner said:

 

A battery RC model railway system is available now, but they use bulky batteries which do not last very long.

This makes it far more practical easier to provide power via rails/wires. Dare I say it - just like the real thing? 

 

Not sure the real thing provides power via the running rails....  

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16 hours ago, bartram108 said:

Of course it does - how about the London Underground, plus all the EMU's using the 3rd rail principle!

 

I don't think you are grasping the wheel to steel interface aspect of running rails. :)  

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On 17/03/2020 at 08:32, Pete the Elaner said:

I would go a stage further with those connections. Instead of just bonding the rails together, why not connect them directly to the bus? It doesn't seem any more difficult to me.

 

On 17/03/2020 at 11:28, hobbyhorse said:

Cuts down on the amount of wires to the bus. Although at times it sometimes gets out of hand with two wires to each section of rail.

 

Just extend the dropper from the bus to bond the rails. Only one wire per rail.

 

 

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