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The Johnster

Worst looking locomotive topic. Antidote to Best Looking Locomotive topic.

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23 hours ago, The Johnster said:

the western hemisphere isn't really known for good looking steam locomotives

Oi!  The entire GWR was located in the western hemisphere, west of the Greenwich Meridian...

 

 

 

And your point is?

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Pure pedantry.  If you cannot see perfection, I cannot explain further...

 

(this is intended to be read as a tongue in cheek comment, I’m not trying to start WW3).

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

(this is intended to be read as a tongue in cheek comment, I’m not trying to start WW3).

 

That's all right, so was mine

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2 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Bulleid’s pacifics were particularly advanced, with soft blue electrically backlit gauges and dials to preserve the drivers’ night vision. 

 

Deep red preserves night vision, not Blue.

 

I suspect Blue was chosen as it was not (then) used by any Signal aspects.

(Not sure about hand lamps though...)

 

 

Kev.

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AFAIK nobody was using blue handlamps.  I don’t think anyone knew deep red was best in those days,  and I’m sure I remember someone telling me it had been used by the RAF during the war.  You could argue ther was no point when every timr the fireman put a round on the glare effectively blinded both men for several minutes for signal sighting purposes.  IIRC the diesels I worked on in the70s were all white but dimly backlit dials with white numbers on a black background, made by Smith’s. 

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Good point about the glare from the fire.

 

 

Kev.

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I've seen something truly awful

Series_L0.JPG

Imagine having a whole runway for a nose :P

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16 hours ago, The Johnster said:

AFAIK nobody was using blue handlamps.  I don’t think anyone knew deep red was best in those days,  and I’m sure I remember someone telling me it had been used by the RAF during the war.  You could argue ther was no point when every timr the fireman put a round on the glare effectively blinded both men for several minutes for signal sighting purposes.  IIRC the diesels I worked on in the70s were all white but dimly backlit dials with white numbers on a black background, made by Smith’s. 

I have an oil pressure gauge that came out of an aircraft (a Spitfire I was told, yeah right!). It has no lighting of its own, but has circumferential slots for bulbs mounted next to the gauge to light the face. The plastic in the slots is blue.

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4 hours ago, lepidotos said:

I've seen something truly awful

Series_L0.JPG

Imagine having a whole runway for a nose :P

 

It needs a nose like that when going half the speed of sound.

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2 hours ago, DavidB-AU said:

 

It needs a nose like that when going half the speed of sound.

 

"And your shoe, slips in here......"

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7 hours ago, rodent279 said:

I have an oil pressure gauge that came out of an aircraft (a Spitfire I was told, yeah right!). It has no lighting of its own, but has circumferential slots for bulbs mounted next to the gauge to light the face. The plastic in the slots is blue.

When I visited Lincoln, about 15 years ago, there were loads of secondhand/junk/antiques shops that were selling bits of old bombers, war surplus from the many airfields in the area I suppose.  Plenty of stuff claiming to come from Lancasters, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and B17s; probably the pickings of stores rather than from actual a/c.  Sadly, a lot ended up on the ground or the sea bed between there and Germany...

 

There were dials and guages control panels, switches, even seats; you could probably have been able to make a fair repro of a cockpit if you'd enough money and the will to stick at it.  The one thing I didn't see was bomb sights, probably not sold off if they were still on the secret list in the late 40s, and with high grade optics.

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East German HR 45. A high pressure design that didn't work based on the conventional pre-War German DRG 45 that did.

Condensation and coal dust tender. The smoke chamber had an induced draft system with blower and drive turbine

 

Model by Trix

15035-95-5.jpg

15035-95-8.jpg

15035-95-9.jpg

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On 08/04/2020 at 10:22, SHMD said:

 

We have a winner -

- in the "For shear shock value" category!

 

 

That is truly the awfulest thing on rails I have seen.

 

 

Kev.

Looks like a proboscis monkey!

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

When I visited Lincoln, about 15 years ago, there were loads of secondhand/junk/antiques shops that were selling bits of old bombers, war surplus from the many airfields in the area I suppose.  Plenty of stuff claiming to come from Lancasters, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and B17s; probably the pickings of stores rather than from actual a/c.  Sadly, a lot ended up on the ground or the sea bed between there and Germany...

 

There were dials and guages control panels, switches, even seats; you could probably have been able to make a fair repro of a cockpit if you'd enough money and the will to stick at it.  The one thing I didn't see was bomb sights, probably not sold off if they were still on the secret list in the late 40s, and with high grade optics.

There’s still one shop on Castle Hill selling the stuff. You’d know where it is it by spotting the crowd of men window watchers. Cheap too!

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42 minutes ago, maico said:

East German HR 45. A high pressure design that didn't work based on the conventional pre-War German DRG 45 that did.

Condensation and coal dust tender. The smoke chamber had an induced draft system with blower and drive turbine

 

Model by Trix

15035-95-5.jpg

15035-95-8.jpg

15035-95-9.jpg

 

The loco end is reminiscent of a steam EE Type 1.....

 

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8 minutes ago, 88D said:

There’s still one shop on Castle Hill selling the stuff. You’d know where it is it by spotting the crowd of men window watchers. Cheap too!

 

I was just about to say that!  Always worth a few minutes' browse when we visit Lincoln, much to the chagrin of Pam when she's trying to get us to the top of the hill for the farmer's market, or something (slightly) less interesting like that.

 

Pete T.

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8 hours ago, rodent279 said:

I have an oil pressure gauge that came out of an aircraft (a Spitfire I was told, yeah right!). It has no lighting of its own, but has circumferential slots for bulbs mounted next to the gauge to light the face.

 

Most Smiths and Jaeger instruments and gauges were externally illuminated like that, prior to internal illumination taking over in the 1960s.  Automotive illumination was usually unfiltered white light (on very rare occasions filtered pale green or pale orange), whereas aeronautical was usually blue filtered.

 

Pete T.

 

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15 hours ago, The Johnster said:

Plenty of stuff claiming to come from Lancasters, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and B17s; probably the pickings of stores rather than from actual a/c.  Sadly, a lot ended up on the ground or the sea bed between there and Germany...

 

 

At the risk of being political. Seventy five years on we should really be remembering what they were going over to Germany to do. And most of those on the receiving end of their deliveries were just ordinary folk.

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Posted (edited)

And just to be balanced, there was a reciprocal arrangement with

Junkers, Heinkels, Dorniers, Fokkers and Messerschmitts.

They all should be remembered.

Edited by [email protected]
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Posted (edited)

Another vote for the various Macleod turbines, and the Kitson Still aberration. They not only appear to be constructed of an assortment of mismatched components, but fail the important test of having no readily apparent logic to their construction, and most importantly that old chestnut about “if it looks right, it IS right”. The Belgian monstrosity with multiple wheelsets in a seemingly random combination qualifies for this, too. They WEREN’T right, failing in their intended function and finding no takers. 

 

Irish broad gauge locomotives can be a bit odd, at times. I suspect that this is partly because they tend to be slightly over-sized Standard-Gauge designs, rather than true broad-Gauge designs in the Indian or Argentine fashion, or the truly gigantic Russian style. 

Edited by rockershovel
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21 hours ago, The Johnster said:

When I visited Lincoln, about 15 years ago, there were loads of secondhand/junk/antiques shops that were selling bits of old bombers, war surplus from the many airfields in the area I suppose.  Plenty of stuff claiming to come from Lancasters, Halifaxes, Stirlings, and B17s; probably the pickings of stores rather than from actual a/c.  Sadly, a lot ended up on the ground or the sea bed between there and Germany...

 

Stirlings and B17s?

 

I didn't know they were dropping GNR and LNER locomotives over Germany.  :prankster:

 

 

Jason

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20 hours ago, Hroth said:

 

The loco end is reminiscent of a steam EE Type 1.....

 

I actually rather like it; a bit GT3...

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On 29/05/2020 at 13:55, DavidB-AU said:

 

It needs a nose like that when going half the speed of sound.

I quite like it, but if you think it is ugly, blink and it'll be gone

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8 hours ago, Vistisen said:

I quite like it, but if you think it is ugly, blink and it'll be gone

I think I will, that's pretty good advice.

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