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Exhibition cancellations (not much to do with that anymore!)


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But these are tests that don't as the Government admit (Grant Schapps) exist at present hence the name moonshot.  They are talking Digital passports to come and go as you please, but the medical advisors are already voicing concern the technology won't be reliable when they do actually invent it.

 

This sounds very much like another plan they had for something that didn't exist but would do in time for another event just across the sea on the island of Ireland and said promised technology still hasn't been presented.

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2 hours ago, John M Upton said:

Anything involving a Government IT project, forget it.

 

Whatever happened to the Tracing App that was due within a fortnight since mid April for example?

 

I never understood why they could not just buy in the IT that had worked in Taiwan and S Korea.

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9 minutes ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

 

I never understood why they could not just buy in the IT that had worked in Taiwan and S Korea.

 

Because the apps that are used in Taiwan and South Korea wouldn't meet UK and EU privacy laws.

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21 minutes ago, MarkSG said:

 

Because the apps that are used in Taiwan and South Korea wouldn't meet UK and EU privacy laws.

 

May be that should not be such a high priority at the moment. But anyway, I am not convinced that any effective tracking system can avoid that problem.

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4 minutes ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

 

May be that should not be such a high priority at the moment. But anyway, I am not convinced that any effective tracking system can avoid that problem.

 

Any deployment of an app that broke UK law would not survive the inevitable judicial review. And it would be very difficult to persuade people to install something like that, in any case.

 

But yes, that is the main reason why no EU country has deployed a fully effective track and trace app. You can make it work, or you can be GDPR-compliant, but not both.

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The Committee of the Erith Model Railway Society have decided with regret to CANCEL our Longfield Exhibition scheduled to take place over the weekend of 30th & 31st January 2021.

 

Given that the pandemic remains and the situations seems to be changing almost on a daily basis, we feel that we have little choice but to cancel now.

 

Our intention is to hold our next show on the weekend of 29th & 30th January 2022.

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This isn't good:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-54108248

Big boat show in Southampton, an outdoor exhibition all sorted out with careful preparations and ready to open shut down at the last minute by the local council.

 

So even if exhibition organisers did go ahead and get a show up and running, there is now the risk of some local clip board waving (actually, do they still have clip boards or are they all ipads now?) official rolling up just before the doors opening telling you its all off, like it or lump it...

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Wow! That really does show how much of a gamble putting on an exhibition would be for a club/promoter. 

What is the situation with insurance in a case like that for exhibitions? 

Have insurance companies had to alter their T's & C's (and charges) in the new normality? 

 

Edited by TEAMYAKIMA
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I find it odd that sports events that temporarily bring together around 2000 people are banned yet the government is encouraging the mass internal migration of young people (the physical reopening of university campuses).

 

In the case of Manchester that means moving over 50,000 new people into a city that already has Covid problems. Trying to stop young people socialising at university will be impossible - let's face it the social life is a big reason for going in the first place... 

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52 minutes ago, fezza said:

I find it odd that sports events that temporarily bring together around 2000 people are banned yet the government is encouraging the mass internal migration of young people (the physical reopening of university campuses).

 

In the case of Manchester that means moving over 50,000 new people into a city that already has Covid problems. Trying to stop young people socialising at university will be impossible - let's face it the social life is a big reason for going in the first place... 

And it's already been stated that University Union bars will not open, thereby pushing the "socialising" outward into pubs etc. to a greater extent than normal.

 

Time for a rethink?

 

John

Edited by Dunsignalling
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1 hour ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

That really does show how much of a gamble putting on an exhibition would be for a club/promoter. 

What is the situation with insurance in a case like that for exhibitions? 

Have insurance companies had to alter their T's & C's (and charges) in the new normality? 

 

 

It does highlight risks taken to organise a show, which need to be considered by any exhibition manager.

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10 hours ago, John M Upton said:

This isn't good:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-54108248

Big boat show in Southampton, an outdoor exhibition all sorted out with careful preparations and ready to open shut down at the last minute by the local council.

 

So even if exhibition organisers did go ahead and get a show up and running, there is now the risk of some local clip board waving (actually, do they still have clip boards or are they all ipads now?) official rolling up just before the doors opening telling you its all off, like it or lump it...

 

Although I am sure the organisers will have updated their formats since I last did a few days work there* as staff on one of the trade stands it was always busy and all the trade stands were in marquees. What surprised me more when I saw that news item of the cancellation was that they had ever thought in the current crisis they could open the event gates. Even on a marina the narrowish width of the walkways would make social distancing difficult. I suspect the killer was the dropping of groups from thirty to only six - the larger trade teams selling top of the range cruisers etc., would probably exceed that when you add their staff to the punters looking around the vessel. 

 

*promoting the Harbour for day sailing, yacht/motor cruiser arrivals and selling marina berth slots.

 

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2 hours ago, fezza said:

Trying to stop young people socialising at university will be impossible - let's face it the social life is a big reason for going in the first place... 

 

I went to university forty years ago to follow a full-time course of occupational study that required hard work and commitment. Whilst there was some time available for socialising, it wasn't one of the "one lecture per week, rest of the time living it up, lying in bed or staring out of the window" doss courses of "waffling" of which there were then already far too many. A rigorous purge of university courses is long overdue, to save the tax payer an awful lot of money thrown away on student loans that are never re-paid. That would solve the Covid19 problem that may be posed by vast numbers of students moving around the country and potentially ignoring social restraint rules. Time at university should be hard work, purely for those capable of that work, for the purpose of improving their later lives, not a huge "party-time experience for almost all 18-21 year olds". 

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23 minutes ago, gr.king said:

 

I went to university forty years ago to follow a full-time course of occupational study that required hard work and commitment. Whilst there was some time available for socialising, it wasn't one of the "one lecture per week, rest of the time living it up, lying in bed or staring out of the window" doss courses of "waffling" of which there were then already far too many. A rigorous purge of university courses is long overdue, to save the tax payer an awful lot of money thrown away on student loans that are never re-paid. That would solve the Covid19 problem that may be posed by vast numbers of students moving around the country and potentially ignoring social restraint rules. Time at university should be hard work, purely for those capable of that work, for the purpose of improving their later lives, not a huge "party-time experience for almost all 18-21 year olds". 

 

It is not a change with the times, it is a variation with courses.

I did a course around 30 years ago. Recommended lecture/tutorial time was about 25 hours. Ours was about 30. That was before out of hours coursework, which was considerable.

When we spoke to the faculty they said the content was impossible to squeeze into anything less.

There were Psychology students on my floor who had 6 hours a week. Lucky b******s!

 

Considering you have been to university, it is disappointing to hear that you have completely forgotten what it is like once you get there.

Most choose their university not because it is on their doorstep but because they are able to study a course which suits them. This means staying there.

 

Socialising is & will always be a part of university life. For many, it is their first time staying away from parents. Many people together, none of whom know anybody else.

A normal working life involves socialising outside of working hours, whether it is with the darts team, model railway club, or an evening in the pub with colleagues/friends/neighbours. For many, social time may well be at home with family. Most students do not have any of these & have also just lost access to their existing friends.

Maybe you would you expect them to lock themselves in their rooms with text books every night?

 

What they do have is many others around them, all in the same position. Socialising is not staying in the pub from 11-11 7 days a week. It could be for 2 hours 2-3 nights a week. This is still enough to cause a problem Covid-wise, but also enough to allow plenty of study time.

& if you want to pick a particularly hard worker, there was 1 person on the floor who stayed up until 4am working every night. That didn't really help because he was nearer the bottom of his class than the top.

 

I thought this thread was about exhibitions: what is happening, when & how we are likely to get them back again.

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1 hour ago, gr.king said:

 

I went to university forty years ago to follow a full-time course of occupational study that required hard work and commitment. Whilst there was some time available for socialising, it wasn't one of the "one lecture per week, rest of the time living it up, lying in bed or staring out of the window" doss courses of "waffling" of which there were then already far too many. A rigorous purge of university courses is long overdue, to save the tax payer an awful lot of money thrown away on student loans that are never re-paid. That would solve the Covid19 problem that may be posed by vast numbers of students moving around the country and potentially ignoring social restraint rules. Time at university should be hard work, purely for those capable of that work, for the purpose of improving their later lives, not a huge "party-time experience for almost all 18-21 year olds". 

 

The topic isn't for debating the value of university courses.

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I did raise an issue a few hours ago that has not been commented on and I fully appreciate that could be because no-one who knows the answer has yet read my post. So I will re-phrase the question.

 

My understanding some six months ago was that if an exhibition due to be held in March/April  was cancelled 'due to government decree' it would probably be covered by insurance as the insurance would probably have been taken out well before the pandemic was contemplated. Now, I maybe wrong in that assumption. but my understanding is that the March 23rd Aly Paly show was not cancelled until the government announcement on March 16th for that very reason - it would then be covered by insurance.

 

But what is the situation now?

 

Assuming that my assumption above is correct, then I would assume that either insurance companies have re-written the part about 'cancelled by government decree' or drastically increased premiums.

 

Can anyone comment?

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4 minutes ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

it would probably be covered by insurance as the insurance would probably have been taken out well before the pandemic was contemplated.

 

It never was covered (under a Magnet insurance policy), I did explain that at the time.

 

4 minutes ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

my understanding is that the March 23rd Aly Paly show was not cancelled until the government announcement on March 16th for that very reason

 

No, it was cancelled based on the evidence and guidance at the time.

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42 minutes ago, TEAMYAKIMA said:

Assuming that my assumption above is correct, then I would assume that either insurance companies have re-written the part about 'cancelled by government decree' or drastically increased premiums.

 

Can anyone comment?

 

As insurance companies are in the business of risk management, I think you could safely assume that the bigger the risk the higher the premium. So if before there wasn't a clause that said "pandemic" they would have added one by now to eliminate the risk and/or they would have increased premiums to off set any of their losses.

 

As a former risk manager our technical definition of risk is an event that has less than 50% chance of occurring anything with more than a 50% chance was an issue and were were to plan as if it was going to occur.  

 

Looking into a crystal ball prices always go up they never come down on these things insurance is going to be a headache for any planning a show for the years to come. As we get better at managing this problem the % risk will drop away and might become a risk less than 50% if so we can start to put our old lives back together but its still a high risk unless the silver bullet arrives. If it does then its no longer a risk any greater than a cold and most people would be able to manage that.

 

Marc  

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I think when shows do get back to being run the whole aspect of organizing them will probably have to be done from scratch, I can see layouts and trade who where due to attend having to be contacted again and all the booking form adjusted for new requirements etc. At the moment I really can't see many if any shows taking place in 2021, until someone puts on a show I think many exhibition manager will just sit tight, it, once shows prove to be viable there will be a lag while layouts and traders are re booked.  

 

Our small Risex show vin February will not take place although may happen later in the year, At the moment I am just sitting and seeing what happens to Railex in May.

 

David  

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